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[SGI] Mind King/9th Consciousness Re: Chanting for benefits question/What we can do

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  • djgropp
    There is no self, but there is a reward body, the mind.
    Message 1 of 149 , Nov 12, 2012
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      There is no self, but there is a reward body, the mind.

      --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, Brian Holly <bholly72@...> wrote:
      >
      > Don, the reason I say this is not relevant is that the issue concerning anatman is the self, not mind, not the ninth consciousness, neither of which are selves. These are fine quotes; they just have nothing to do with the issue.
      >
      > > To: SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: djgropp@...
      > > Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2012 16:12:45 +0000
      > > Subject: [SGI] Mind King/9th Consciousness Re: Chanting for benefits question/What we can do
      > >
      > > Brian, aren't you familiar with the mind-king?
      > >
      > > I wrote: "From [the] element of mind spring all the various lands and environmental conditions" (WND-2, 843) and you replied, "But, Don, this quote simply doesn't back up what you said."
      > >
      > > I said I'd be back with my sources.
      > >
      > > Excerpt from Ikeda lecture on "Hell is the Land of Tranquil Light"
      > > Living Buddhism 11/01/2008 p.39
      > > ….
      > > There is absolutely no need for us to pretend in front of the Gohonzon. We should chant to the Gohonzon just as we are—with joy when we're elated, and with sadness when we're feeling down. We should regard both suffering and joy as facts of life and continue
      > > chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo steadfastly to the very end. Through the vast power of the Mystic Law, all of our prayers form part of our Buddhist practice. Those who continue to resolutely chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, come what may, will achieve true victory. A person who chants with this spirit and manifests the power of the Mystic Law in their lives is truly a "Buddha in life."
      > >
      > > Mr. Toda said: "To enjoy complete peace of mind in the depths of one's being is what it means to be a Buddha…. As a result of embracing the Gohonzon, the life of one who is ill, for example, will be transformed into one of complete peace of mind. With this deep
      > > underlying serenity, one will find pleasure in the simple act of living…. Don't you think that finding life itself an absolute joy is what it means to be a Buddha? Isn't this what it means to attain the same life-state as Nichiren?"18
      > >
      > > To explain this state of life to the lay nun Ueno, Nichiren cites the passage: "You should base your mind on the ninth consciousness, and carry out your practice in the six consciousnesses" (WND-1, 458).
      > >
      > > The "ninth consciousness" is life that is pure without defilements and one with the Mystic Law, the ultimate truth. It means the Buddha nature innate in all life. Our lives are inherently palaces wherein dwells the "mind king,"19 the fundamental entity of the mind known as the ninth consciousness. In one writing, we find the expression the "palace of the ninth consciousness, the unchanging reality that reigns over all of life's functions"20 ("The Real Aspect of the Gohonzon," WND-1, 832). Nichiren inscribed this inherent reality of our lives in the form of the Gohonzon. Therefore, to "base one's mind on the ninth consciousness" means simply chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with faith in the Gohonzon.
      > >
      > > The "six consciousnesses" means the five senses (sight, sound, smell, taste and touch), which function in response to the phenomena of the world around us, plus the awareness that integrates these five senses. In other words, the six consciousnesses indicate our actual
      > > lives in this world. "To carry out one's practice in the six consciousnesses" means firmly establishing the state of Buddhahood within us by making our daily lives our place of practice. This is the principle of "faith manifesting itself in daily life."
      > >
      > > It could further be said that "basing one's mind on the ninth consciousness" and "carrying out one's practice in the six consciousnesses" encompasses all of our Soka Gakkai activities. This is because, while grounding our lives solidly in the world of Buddhahood, we go out to spread the Mystic Law and lead people to enlightenment amid society with all its problems and suffering.
      > >
      > > Encouraging others in faith requires an earnest, all-out effort. It entails a powerful interaction on the dimension of life itself, invoking the dynamics of the "three thousand realms in a single life-moment" of each person. It is a dedicated challenge in which we
      > > polish our own lives so that we can consolidate our Buddhahood, while seeking to elevate the lives of our friends so they may do the same.
      > >
      > > What a source of strength and courage this letter must have been to the lay nun Ueno.
      > >
      > > Later in life, this admirable mother suddenly lost her fifth son when he was 16 years old. Her second son and head of the family, Tokimitsu, was also struck by a severe illness that nearly cost him his life. Even while battling such painful destiny, the lay nun Ueno
      > > continued to seek out Nichiren's teachings. She fought on tenaciously and won a splendid victory.
      > >
      > > How wonderful it is to struggle together with a teacher in faith who has a profound understanding of the Buddhist view of life and death. The principle of attaining Buddhahood in one's present form is actualized when both teacher and disciple can savor joy in both life and death.
      > >
      > > This lecture was published in the December 2007 issue of The Daibyakurenge, the Soka Gakkai study journal.
      > > ….
      > > 11. "Hell is itself the Land of Eternally Tranquil Light": This means that the world of hell, a life-state of suffering, can become, just as it is, the Land of Eternally Tranquil Light where the Buddha dwells. "Hell" means a world of extreme suffering, and "the Land of
      > > Eternally Tranquil Light" means the world of Buddhahood. That the world of hell is itself the world of Buddhahood figuratively expresses the principle of the mutual possession of the Ten Worlds.
      > > 18. Translated from Japanese. Josei Toda, Toda Josei zenshu (Collected Writings of Josei Toda) (Tokyo: Seikyo Shimbunsha, 1982), vol. 2, pp. 446–47.
      > > 19. "Mind king" refers to the core of the mind, which controls the various workings of the mind.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • savantakashik
      Very well phrased and I endorse what you say. Nevertheless, with Nichiren Daishonin who established this Buddhism for the Latter Day of The Law, having
      Message 149 of 149 , Nov 23, 2012
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        Very well phrased and I endorse what you say. Nevertheless, with
        Nichiren Daishonin who established this Buddhism for the Latter Day of
        The Law, having categorized his disciples into three groups may cause
        some people to wonder about which category they or their friends are
        apart. I don't think many members have heard this quotation, but what if
        this was disseminated at a large meeting. Maybe individuals of these
        different categories would become more apparent in the discussions
        afterwards. We all have our strengths and weaknesses without having to
        be concerned with which category we find ourselves or having our founder
        implying that we might be in one of them.

        Nichiren Daishonin also encourages us to be as inseparable as fish and
        the water in which they swim. Now we can think as each pond inwhich we
        find ourselves as one of his categories. Even so, at the time of death,
        we all return to our previous enlightened state as Bodhisattvas of the
        Earth. So there is a happy ending.


        --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "verrytesty"
        <verrytesty@...> wrote:
        Buddhism speaks to this reality; Unavoidably equal in what we
        fundamentally are. Unequal in our personal belief_AND_understanding of
        the fundamentals.




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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