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Re: Buddhist nature

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  • theothergracie
    As the person who started this thread, I have a few things to say. And I will use Albert Einstein s words to say one. Any intelligent fool can make things
    Message 1 of 72 , Jan 1, 2011
      As the person who started this thread, I have a few things to say. And I will use Albert Einstein's words to say one.

      Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex... It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.
      Albert Einstein

      This means that you TOTALLY MISSED MY POINT.

      I also do not think most of you people could find your way out of a paper bag with a flashlight and a compass.

      I was thinking about coming back to Nichiren Shoshu after 40 years. After delving into the theology behind it, I realized there is much that Nichiren did NOT say and I took for granted, knowing what I do from the "secrets" of the British Druids and the Rosicrucians (same universal secret LOL). He probably well knew this also, but was not going to tell his followers, instead waiting for them to discover it themselves (become enlightened) after handing them a key to discover it themselves (chanting). I surely do not need you people, not do I need a gohonzon from monks who are probably equally as enlightened as all of you. I have ordered one from a print shop and can do my own eye opening ceremony!

      All your bickering and selfishness make me glad you do not know the secrets, and glad that I do not know YOU. I'll be leaving this group and not joining Nichiren Shoshu again, which BTW have not returned a single one of my phone calls anyways (Spokane). It leaves the impression you are ALL happy pigs in the mud, so to speak, and need no new companions.

      Yes, I realize you are only human, but the point of Buddhism is to strive towards enlightenment. FAIL on so many levels. I hope this helps you on your path. Goodbye.


      --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, theothergracie <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > After reading a lot on this site, I am wondering where the buddhist spirit of tolerance is...
      >
      > Taken from the official SG site:
      >
      > ...Based on conviction in the dignity and inherent worth of all human beings, as taught in the Lotus Sutra, individuals are trusted to develop the ability to see the true nature of their thoughts, words and actions, and the wisdom to make the right choices for their lives. Practicing Buddhism naturally leads one to refrain from denigrating and destroying life and to wish to support and encourage others...
      >
      > and the (Official) charter:
      >
      > Purposes and Principles
      > 1. SGI shall contribute to peace, culture and education for the happiness and welfare of all humanity based on Buddhist respect for the sanctity of life.
      > 2. SGI, based on the ideal of world citizenship, shall safeguard fundamental human rights and not discriminate against any individual on any grounds.
      > 8. SGI shall respect cultural diversity and promote cultural exchange, thereby creating an international society of mutual understanding and harmony.
      > 10. SGI shall contribute to the promotion of education, in pursuit of truth as well as the development of scholarship, to enable all people to cultivate their individual character and enjoy fulfilling and happy lives.
      >
    • Mick
      ... Supposedly my name Michael, in whatever language it originated in, meant beloved by God. I think I ll stick with Mick.
      Message 72 of 72 , Jan 14, 2011
        --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, "djgropp" <djgropp@...> wrote:
        >
        > <<Nichiren (Sun Lotus)>>
        >
        > I admit that Nichiren, to me, will always be Nichiren. I don't think you can translate a person's name into another lanquage. If you call out the translated name, the person you're referring to won't answer.
        >

        Supposedly my name Michael, in whatever language it originated
        in, meant beloved by God. I think I'll stick with Mick.


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        > --- In SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com, jodine richards <jodiner@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I like the Japanese influence mixed with the English and our native language when we relate to each other....... :) Nice cross cultural environment......It would be boring if it was all english or all visayan over here.......Im happy to learn japanese terms...!
        > > And I love Nichiren (Sun Lotus),,,
        > >
        > > Jodine
        > >
        > > --- On Fri, 12/31/10, Angela <passaroa25@> wrote:
        > >
        > > From: Angela <passaroa25@>
        > > Subject: Re: [SGI] Re: Buddhist nature
        > > To: SokaGakkaiUnofficial@yahoogroups.com
        > > Date: Friday, December 31, 2010, 11:59 PM
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        > > I hit the send button by mistake while editing what I wrote. The rest of
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        > > the sentence reads: "... that I had thought had become a word adopted from
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        > > a different language and understood by English speakers; similar to raison
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        > > d'etre."
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        > > Angela
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        > > On Dec 31, 2010 10:54 AM, "Angela" <passaroa25@> wrote:
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        > > Now that you mention it, I have noticed a subtle trend here, in the United
        > >
        > > States, to move away from using Japanese terms at meetings. I haven't heard
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        > > anyone mention "hancho" or "ichinen" for quite some time. At a meeting a
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        > > few months ago, I talked about having gone on tozan and one senior leader
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        > > interrupted me and said, "what do you mean by tozan?" I was speechless
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        > > for one because I really didn't know what it meant in English. I was
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        > > surprised that a chapter leader even preferred English over Japanese. And,
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        > > I felt criticized for using a Japanese term that I ha Some members no
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        > > longer require the other members to take their shoes off at district or
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        > > group meetings. And, when I suggested that we should have strong faith like
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        > > President Ikeda, at a meeting in New York, one member said she didn't want
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        > > to be like President Ikeda. And, no one in the group disagreed with her.
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        > > We have definitely moved away from "Japanese control." For some reason,
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        > > it's not considered racist any longer.
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        > > I liked the strong Japanese influence. But, I recognize that I am clearly
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        > > in the minority.
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        > > > On Dec 31, 2010 9:51 AM, "Mick" <mickg1@> wrote:
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        > > > --- In SokaGakkaiUn...
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