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Re: [SocietyforClassicalPhysics] Hydrinos vs. "Recent Extraordinary Cold Fusion Claims"

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  • Randell Mills
    ... The water-flow calorimetric details and materials characterization are given in our paper along with the mechanism and hydrino product identification. Our
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 22, 2011
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      On Jun 22, 2011, at 12:55 AM, scarmani wrote:

      > Dear Dr. Mills,
      >
      > In the email post below, you state "If you are looking for a
      > theoretical explanation for recent extraordinary cold fusion
      > claims, my assessment is that you are wasting your time. Based on
      > theory and experiments, I'm confident that the claims will not be
      > reproduced independently."
      >
      > You were likely referring to the recent extraordinary cold fusion
      > claims made by Andrea Rossi, Dr. Focardi and Dr. Levi.
      >
      > I agree with your assessment that Rossi's claims will not be
      > reproduced independently. I will further state that, in my
      > opinion, they are fraudulent.
      >
      > Rossi described (via Swedish observers), a cylindrical 50 cm^3
      > stainless steel reactor, containing 50 grams of isotopically
      > enriched powdered nickel and 0.11 grams of hydrogen gas plus a
      > secret catalyst, to which was input 0.3 kW of heat. Upon reaching
      > a threshold temperature, this reactor output approximately 4.4 kW
      > of continuous power and a net 25 kWh of excess energy over the
      > course of about 6 hours. According to Rossi, this energy was
      > produced by a non-chemical reaction which consumed the hydrogen.
      >
      > In 2008 you issued a paper, Commercializable Power Source from
      > Forming New States of Hydrogen, R.L. Mills, G. Zhao, K. Akhtar, Z.
      > Chang, J. He, Y. Lu, W. Good, G. Chu, B. Dhandapani, Int. J.
      > Hydrogen Energy, Vol. 34, Issue 2, January 2009, pp. 573-614.

      The water-flow calorimetric details and materials characterization
      are given in our paper along with the mechanism and hydrino product
      identification. Our results have been independently reproduced off-
      site starting with obtaining the chemicals from vendors, then
      characterizing the reactants, and performing power measurements and
      product and hydrino characterizations.

      Regarding Rossi et. al., the results we obtained at BLP from
      following the description in the Rossi patent application are
      consistent with the known heat of formation of nickel hydride of
      about -2 kcal/mole H2 corresponding to 10^-2 Wh for 0.011g H2.

      B. Baranowski, S. M. Filipek, “45 years of nickel hydride—history and
      perspectives,” J. Alloys Compd., 404-406, (2005), pp. 2-6.

      No isotopic enrichment is disclosed. Nor, is a method of enrichment
      shown if it is possible. No catalyst is disclosed. A patent must
      teach one skilled in the art how to make and use the invention. The
      speciation teaches how to make about -2 kcal/mole H2 forming nickel
      hydride that is known in the art. But, even here, the H2 pressure is
      far too low.

      The fusion reaction is theoretically impossible and not shown
      experimentally. Nor, is net power shown experimentally by the
      method presented. At 4.4 kW output, the heater power could be
      disconnected and threshold temperature to maintain the claimed
      reaction will be far exceeded. The proper method of measuring power
      from steam is to condense it and measure the heat delivered by the
      steam. This was not done. Based on the energy balance and power
      density in this case as well as in more aggressive claims, it is
      overwhelmingly possible that the heat balance was not measured properly.


      >
      > You described (via this paper) a cylindrical 60 cm^3 stainless
      > steel reactor, containing 15 grams of NaOH-doped R-Ni 2400, to
      > which was input 0.1 kW of heat. Upon reaching a threshold
      > temperature, this reactor output over 0.25 kW of peak power and a
      > net 0.003 kWh (11.7 kJ) of excess energy over the course of about
      > an hour. According to your paper, this energy was produced by a non-
      > chemical reaction which consumed hydrogen.
      >
      > Superficially there appear to be similarities between the
      > abovementioned reactions. Both involve nanostructured, nickel
      > containing materials which have in some manner been charged with
      > hydrogen, being heated in small stainless steel reaction chambers
      > to trigger an excess-heat-releasing, hydrogen-consuming reaction,
      > the explanation of which invokes a catalytic mechanism that
      > generates excess energy through novel, non-chemical means.
      >
      > It might seem to the casual observer who accepted the experimental
      > results and theoretical explanations of Blacklight Power with
      > regards to excess heat production in nickel / hydrogen systems, and
      > who read the reports of Rossi's extraordinary claims, that Rossi
      > could have have stumbled into a technique of producing hydrinos
      > rapidly in nickel/hydrogen systems using some special catalyst.
      > But presumably you do not agree that this is a possibility.
      >
      > Could you clarify the differences between the recent extraordinary
      > claims of Rossi, and your earlier published reports of hydrino-
      > based reactions, and explain the reasons why, despite the
      > superficial similarities mentioned above, you are confident that
      > the recent claims of Rossi et al will not be reproduced
      > independently, and should not be confused or associated with the
      > work being done by Blacklight Power?
      >
      > Best regards,
      > Armand Tuzel
      >
      >
      > --- In SocietyforClassicalPhysics@yahoogroups.com, Randy Mills
      > <RMills@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> The smallest radius for a hydrino atom is 1/137 the radius of the
      >> hydrogen atom. Muonic atoms have a radius of 1/207 the radius of
      >> the hydrogen atom and are not known to pass through the electron
      >> shells of multielectron atoms.
      >>
      >> If you are looking for a theoretical explanation for recent
      >> extraordinary cold fusion claims, my assessment is that you are
      >> wasting your time. Based on theory and experiments, I'm confident
      >> that the claims will not be reproduced independently.
      >>
      >>
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> From: mixent@... [mailto:mixent@...]
      >> Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 03:48 PM
      >> To: SocietyforClassicalPhysics@yahoogroups.com
      >> <SocietyforClassicalPhysics@yahoogroups.com>
      >> Subject: Re: [SocietyforClassicalPhysics] Can a neutron pass
      >> through an orbitsphere
      >>
      >> In reply to Randy Mills's message of Sat, 16 Apr 2011 15:10:55
      >> +0000:
      >> Hi,
      >> [snip]
      >>> Neutrons are neutral.
      >>
      >> Overall yes, but the question is, do they have a negative near field
      >> (compensated for by a central positive field)?
      >> If so, then there should be little apparent difference between a
      >> severely
      >> shrunken Hydrino, and a neutron, when it comes to passing through
      >> the electron
      >> shells of other atoms.
      >> [snip]
      >>>> Then, the same could be said for helium. It is an easy calculation
      >>>> to see that this will not happen.
      >>>
      >>> Neutrons purportedly also have a negative near field, yet clearly
      >>> manage to
      >>> arrive at the nuclei of other atoms without difficulty at thermal
      >>> energies,
      >>> otherwise nuclear reactors wouldn't work.
      >>> Regards,
      >>>
      >>> Robin van Spaandonk <mixent@...>
      >> Regards,
      >>
      >> Robin van Spaandonk
      >>
      >> http://rvanspaa.freehostia.com/Project.html
      >>
      >>
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    • amack43
      I went back and read your book again. My 2010 edition has a paragraph on Hydrino Catlyzed Fusion (HCF)at page 223. As I understand it, you don t rule out that
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 22, 2011
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        I went back and read your book again. My 2010 edition has a paragraph on Hydrino Catlyzed Fusion (HCF)at page 223.

        As I understand it, you don't rule out that fusion may occur as the radius of deuterium or tritium collapses in the presence of hydrino type catalysts, and you give the example that this type of fusion can be considered similar to muon assisted fusion where the mass of the muon causes a reduction of the intranuclear distance by a factor of 200 and increases the rate of fusion by 80 orders of magnitude.

        Is the BLP position therefore that fusion may occur but that in the majority of so called cold fusion experiments, conditions do not exist that would support fusion and/or if any such experiments do produce excess heat or energy, the mechanism will be solely by hydrino collapse and would likely be demonstrated by the presence in such experiments of hydrino type catalysts being atoms, ions or molecules?
      • Randell Mills
        ... The energy in BLP s experiments is predominately from forming H2(1/4) and H-(1/4) as confirmed by BLP and independent analytical analysis of reaction
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 23, 2011
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          On Jun 23, 2011, at 12:59 AM, amack43 wrote:

          >
          >
          > I went back and read your book again. My 2010 edition has a
          > paragraph on Hydrino Catlyzed Fusion (HCF)at page 223.
          >
          > As I understand it, you don't rule out that fusion may occur as the
          > radius of deuterium or tritium collapses in the presence of hydrino
          > type catalysts, and you give the example that this type of fusion
          > can be considered similar to muon assisted fusion where the mass of
          > the muon causes a reduction of the intranuclear distance by a
          > factor of 200 and increases the rate of fusion by 80 orders of
          > magnitude.
          >
          > Is the BLP position therefore that fusion may occur but that in the
          > majority of so called cold fusion experiments, conditions do not
          > exist that would support fusion and/or if any such experiments do
          > produce excess heat or energy, the mechanism will be solely by
          > hydrino collapse and would likely be demonstrated by the presence
          > in such experiments of hydrino type catalysts being atoms, ions or
          > molecules?
          >
          >



          The energy in BLP's experiments is predominately from forming H2(1/4)
          and H-(1/4) as confirmed by BLP and independent analytical analysis
          of reaction products. H2(1/4) will not support fusion much better
          than that which occurs with the ordinary H2. But, if states such as H
          (1/137) are formed using the appropriate catalyst systems or many
          cycles of a given catalyst while selectively blocking intermediate H2
          (/p) and H-(1/p) formation in the process, then the mechanism above
          applies. Cold fusion experiments are not creating fusion, especially
          that of heavy elements, in my view.





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