Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SocietyforClassicalPhysics] If I was running things...

Expand Messages
  • Mike Carrell
    ... From: nferguson2005 To: SocietyforClassicalPhysics@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:42 AM Subject: [SocietyforClassicalPhysics] If I was
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 31, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: nferguson2005
      To: SocietyforClassicalPhysics@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:42 AM
      Subject: [SocietyforClassicalPhysics] If I was running things...


      I can't quite believe they're going to be shoveling hundreds of tons
      of R-Ni around like coal in the bowels of the Titanic. R-Ni is
      extremely expensive and sounds both delicate and volatile. Just using
      raw nickel as the substrate in the quantities suggested would cost
      huge sums.
      ------------------------
      In my years as an observer and advocate for Randy and BLP, I have noted that
      the current phase, commercialization, may be the most difficult and full of
      surprises. This is based on long industrial experience with the transition
      from research to manufacture. Your postulated inplementation is one of many
      to be considered. Randy has pledged disclosure of progress [as soon as
      patent applictions are in] and mentioned regeneration and continuous burn. I
      haven't tried to visualize that process because I don't know enough details.

      In respose to another question about the number of time the R-Ni can be
      reused, Randy noted that such is proprietary. Fair enough, but that
      indicates a limit of sorts, which makes R-Ni a consumeable and not an
      investment. Such details, the energy of electrolysis and the steam turbine,
      influence the viability of the project. There is a finite energy budget and
      a *lot* of engineering yet to do.

      Mike Carrell
      ------------------------
    • Tim Perdue
      Perhaps the process is more similar to the catalytic converter in any car. There was a day when people thought those would be prohibitively expensive due to
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 3, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Perhaps the process is more similar to the catalytic converter in any car. There was a day when people thought those would be prohibitively expensive due to the materials inside, and as far as I know, they don't have to be stopped/reprocessed/scraped out, etc for them to do their magic.



        8. When combustion is complete, the exhaust manifold is shut off from
        the boiler, and the system is purged by feeding hydrogen or perhaps an
        inert gas (maybe hydrino hydride?) through the system.


      • Jeremiah Davis
        ... That is precisely the difference between a reaction catalyst, and a fully recyclable reactant. Jeremiah
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 4, 2008
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          > Perhaps the process is more similar to the catalytic converter in any car.
          ...
          > they don't have to be stopped/reprocessed/scraped out, etc for them to do their magic.

          That is precisely the difference between a reaction catalyst, and a
          fully recyclable reactant.


          Jeremiah
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.