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Re: "For MANY are called, but FEW are chosen."

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  • Bob Michael
    Unless there is an innate passion to find out, to discover for oneself one will not be equipped to live the meditative way. Meditation is a total way of
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2008
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      Unless there is an innate passion to find out,
      to discover for oneself one will not be equipped
      to live the meditative way. Meditation is a
      total way of living, not a partial or fragmentary
      activity… Life is neither occidental or oriental…
      There is no excitement in a real enquirer, there
      is a depth of intensity, not the shallowness of
      enthusiastic excitement… Then that state of
      observation begins to permeate the waking hours.
      Whether you cook a meal, go to the office, or
      while you are talking, the state of observation
      begins to permeate all activities of the waking
      hours… When the state of observation is sustained
      the sensitivity gets heightened, and from morning
      till night you are much more aware than before…
      It is no use concentrating your attention upon
      the activities of the mind, to the exclusion of
      the rest of your way of living. Meditation is
      something pertaining to the whole being and the
      whole life. Either you live in it or you do not
      live in it. In another words, it is related to
      everything physical and psychological… Thus,
      from the small area of mental activity, we have
      brought meditation to a vast field of consciousness,
      where it gets related to the way you sit or stand,
      the way you gesticulate or articulate throughout
      the day. Whether you want it or not, the inner
      state of your being gets expressed in your
      behaviour… This co-relation of meditation to the
      total way of living is the first requirement on
      the path of total transformation… Very few of us
      realise that constant verbalisation is one of the
      greatest obstacles in the path of meditation…
      Life is a homogeneous whole and you can never
      fragment it… To be aware of the lapse or the gap
      is itself a kind of observation.

      [From 'Meditation, A Way of Life' - Vimala Thakar)

      Bob M.
    • Bob Michael
      I think Krishnamurti was one of the few spiritual men , at least in modern times, to be honest enough to admit that he failed to be of much, if any, real
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
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        I think Krishnamurti was one of the few
        'spiritual men', at least in modern times,
        to be honest enough to admit that he failed
        to be of much, if any, real benefit in the
        awakening of his fellow men, save for perhaps
        the possiblity of a few, who were unknown to
        him.

        Bob M.
        _________________________________________________

        --- In Soar_Like_An_Eagle_2@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Michael"
        <new_trail_blazer@...> wrote:
        >
        > J. Krishnamurti once stated that he felt that
        > only about 10% of humanity were not irreparably
        > stuck in the 'me-me-me' and were thereby capable
        > of attaining the liberation that he had found.
        >
        > I put the number of those capable of fully
        > discovering and LIVING the "real I" or recapturing
        > that wonderful state of Love at around 2-5%.
        >
        > Bob M.
      • Bob Michael
        What you have been saying for half a century strikes a responsive cord; yet to my understanding, it appears partial and incomplete. It seems to ignore time,
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 2, 2008
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          "What you have been saying for half a century strikes
          a responsive cord; yet to my understanding, it appears
          partial and incomplete. It seems to ignore time,
          change, and becoming. I suspect it is my own anxiety
          that impels me to ask you for a process that will
          produce uncaused freedom. Nevertheless, something
          in me does not let go; and I am not sure whether
          this is my weakness or my strength. I am troubled
          because I do not know how to reconcile the call I
          hear from your distant shore with the realities where
          I am. It is clear that a bridge cannot be built from
          here to There. But can it be built from There to here?"

          [Ravi Ravindra in a letter to Krishnamurti, 1977]

          Bob M.
          ____________________________________________________

          --- In Soar_Like_An_Eagle_2@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Michael"
          <new_trail_blazer@...> wrote:
          >
          > I think Krishnamurti was one of the few
          > 'spiritual men', at least in modern times,
          > to be honest enough to admit that he failed
          > to be of much, if any, real benefit in the
          > awakening of his fellow men, save for perhaps
          > the possiblity of a few, who were unknown to
          > him.
          >
          > Bob M.
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