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The human species...a work in progress?

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  • new_trail_blazer
    Man, Gurdjieff taught, is an undeveloped creation. He is not really man, considered as a cosmically unique being whose intelligence and power of action mirror
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 3, 2005
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      Man, Gurdjieff taught, is an undeveloped creation. He is not really
      man, considered as a cosmically unique being whose intelligence and
      power of action mirror the energies of the source of life itself. On
      the contrary, man as we encounter him is an automaton. His thoughts,
      feelings, and deeds are little more than mechanical reactions to
      external and internal stimuli. He cannot do anything. In and around
      him, everything happens without the participation of his own
      authentic consciousness. But human beings are ignorant of this state
      of affairs because of the pervasive influence of culture and
      education, which engrave in them the illusion of autonomous conscious
      selves. In short, man is asleep. There is no authentic I am in his
      presence, but only an egoism which masquerades as the authentic self,
      and whose machinations poorly imitate the normal human functions of
      thought, feeling, and will.

      Many factors reinforce this sleep. Each of the reactions that proceed
      in one's presence is accompanied by a deceptive sense of I—man is
      many I's, each imagining itself to be the whole, and each buffered
      off from awareness of the others. Each of these many I's represents a
      process whereby the subtle energy of consciousness is absorbed and
      degraded, a process that Gurdjieff termed "identification." Man
      identifies—that is, squanders his conscious energy, with every
      passing thought, impulse, and sensation. This state of affairs takes
      the form of a continuous self-deception and a continuous procession
      of egoistic emotions, such as anger, self-pity, sentimentality, and
      fear which are of such a pervasively painful nature that man is
      constantly driven to ameliorate this condition through the endless
      pursuit of social recognition, sensory pleasure, or the vague and
      unrealizable goal of "happiness."

      http://bmrc.berkeley.edu/people/misc/School.html

      Bob M.
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