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Filling The Inner Void With Kindness.....

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  • new_trail_blazer
    Come To It Empty-Handed Compassion is not hard to come by when the heart is not filled with the cunning things of the mind. It is the mind with its demands
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2004
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      'Come To It Empty-Handed'

      "Compassion is not hard to come by when the heart is not filled with
      the cunning things of the mind. It is the mind with its demands and
      fears, its attachments and denials, its determinations and urges,
      that destroys love. And how difficult it is to be simple about all
      this! You don't need philosophies and doctrines to be gentle and
      kind. The efficient and the powerful of the land will organize to
      feed and clothe the people, to provide them with shelter and medical
      care. This is inevitable with the rapid increase of production; it is
      the function of well-organized government and a balanced society. But
      organization does not give the generosity of the heart and hand.
      Generosity comes from quite a different source, a source beyond all
      measure. Ambition and envy destroy it as surely as fire burns. This
      source must be touched, but one must come to it empty-handed, without
      prayer, without sacrifice. Books cannot teach nor can any guru lead
      to this source. It cannot be reached through the cultivation of
      virtue, though virtue is necessary, nor through capacity and
      obedience. When the mind is serene, without any movement, it is
      there. Serenity is without motive, without the urge for the more."

      Krishnamurti's Notebook---Nov. 30
    • George Walton
      Nietzsche: I say yes to life. So what? Anyone can say yes to life. You can say yes as a Communist, a libertarian, an Objectivist, a Christian, an
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 30, 2004
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        Nietzsche: "I say 'yes' to life."



        So what? Anyone can say "yes" to life. You can say "yes" as a Communist, a libertarian, an Objectivist, a Christian, an atheist, a nazi, a scientologist, a buddhist, an Islamic, a Marxist, a capitalist, a Republican, a Democrat. And all these folks really share in common is the manner in which their ideological agendas have almost nothing to do with the reality of a profoundly complex, contingency laden world.

        But Nietzsche's "yes" is, admittedly, very different from most above. Why? Because it is not wrapped around The Truth. It does not evolve out of essentialism, or idealism, or rationalism or any other point of view said to reflect the One And Only Really TRUE Way to encompass human existence. It springs from the individual creating and then recreating his or her own values over and again out in the real world. But there are no more or less "authentic" values...nor a more or less "authentic" direction in which to go with them. In the absense of God all values are, in fact, ultimately interchangable. Including Nietzsche's. And mine. And yours.

        You will notice, in fact, that Nietzsche writes very little about how the Overman's actual day to day interactions with others will unfold. What does this Superman actually [i]do[/i] with his life? Instead, he is more concerned with projecting a psychological agenda...one removed from meekness and weakness...from Christianity and "the herd" mentality. What counts is this: that you forge your way boldly through life displaying strenght and courage and fortitude and stamina and purpose.

        But that can translate into any number of conflicting and contradictory trajectories, right? In fact, Nietzsche's philosophy is more or less analogous to a scaffolding...a psychological framework into which practically any moral or political agenda can be stuffed. And how relevant is that to the actual historical evolution of mankind? No more relevant than, say, Kant's?

        How potent is the "will to power" in motivating people to behave as they do? In my view these psychological agendas always pale next to more basic biological drives---for food, water, clothing and shelter. Human beings agglomerate into communities in order to facilitate their subsistence---[i]as a community[/i]. And to secure a stable environment in which to to procreate. And to establish mechanisms for defending the community against enemies. The emphasis here will almost always be on [i]social[/i] interaction....rather than the point of view of any particular indivdual. Some will acquire more power than others, sure. But that will always be intertwined in social contexts that are far too complex to be "overcome" by self-professed Ubermensch.

        George





        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        The all-new My Yahoo! � What will yours do?

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • new_trail_blazer
        Nice offering George. I was immediately reminded by it of the old addage, talk is cheap-action(out on the firing line of life) speaks louder than words.
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 30, 2004
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          Nice offering George. I was immediately reminded by it of the old
          addage, "talk is cheap-action(out on the firing line of life) speaks
          louder than words."

          Saying 'yes' to life means to me being a light unto oneself and
          others in one's every word, thought and deed. And more and more I'm
          coming to realize that sharing with others our own personal
          experiences of change is the best way to help our fellows. And for
          certain this would include mention of our own past failings and short-
          comings.

          So in keeping it short for now, I certainly agree in keeping things
          down to earth and as you say in the bounds of 'day to day
          interactions with others'. And indeed it is real easy to hide
          in 'isms', philosophy, psychology, religion, politics, etc., rather
          than engage in rigorously honest self-inquiry, in which alone true
          freedom and purposefulness is to be found.

          Lastly I'm prompted here to enter Nietzsche's prescription for the
          self-overcomer. My own experiences relate to its essence quite well.

          "This book (The AntiChrist) belongs to the most rare of men. Perhaps
          not one of them is yet alive. It is possible that they may be among
          those who understand my "Zarathustra": how could I confound myself
          with those who are now sprouting ears?--First the day after tomorrow
          must come for me. Some men are born posthumously."

          "The conditions under which any one understands me, and necessarily
          understands me--I know them only too well. Even to endure my
          seriousness, my passion, he must carry intellectual integrity to the
          verge of hardness. He must be accustomed to living on mountain tops--
          and to looking upon the wretched gabble of politics and nationalism
          as beneath him. He must have become indifferent; he must never ask of
          the truth whether it brings profit to him or a fatality to him... He
          must have an inclination, born of strength, for questions that no one
          has the courage for; the courage for the forbidden; predestination
          for the labyrinth. The experience of seven solitudes. New ears for
          new music. New eyes for what is most distant. A new conscience for
          truths that have hitherto remained unheard. And the will to economize
          in the grand manner--to hold together his strength, his
          enthusiasm...Reverence for self; love of self; absolute freedom of
          self."

          "Very well, then! of that sort only are my readers, my true readers,
          my readers foreordained: of what account are the rest?--The rest are
          merely humanity.--One must make one's self superior to humanity, in
          power, in loftiness of soul,--in contempt."

          Friedrich W. Nietzsche (Preface to 'The Antichrist')

          Bob M.

          *******************************************************

          --- In theexistentialsociety@yahoogroups.com, George Walton
          <iambiguously@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Nietzsche: "I say 'yes' to life."
          >
          >
          >
          > So what? Anyone can say "yes" to life. You can say "yes" as a
          Communist, a libertarian, an Objectivist, a Christian, an atheist, a
          nazi, a scientologist, a buddhist, an Islamic, a Marxist, a
          capitalist, a Republican, a Democrat. And all these folks really
          share in common is the manner in which their ideological agendas have
          almost nothing to do with the reality of a profoundly complex,
          contingency laden world.
          >
          > But Nietzsche's "yes" is, admittedly, very different from most
          above. Why? Because it is not wrapped around The Truth. It does not
          evolve out of essentialism, or idealism, or rationalism or any other
          point of view said to reflect the One And Only Really TRUE Way to
          encompass human existence. It springs from the individual creating
          and then recreating his or her own values over and again out in the
          real world. But there are no more or less "authentic" values...nor a
          more or less "authentic" direction in which to go with them. In the
          absense of God all values are, in fact, ultimately interchangable.
          Including Nietzsche's. And mine. And yours.
          >
          > You will notice, in fact, that Nietzsche writes very little about
          how the Overman's actual day to day interactions with others will
          unfold. What does this Superman actually [i]do[/i] with his life?
          Instead, he is more concerned with projecting a psychological
          agenda...one removed from meekness and weakness...from Christianity
          and "the herd" mentality. What counts is this: that you forge your
          way boldly through life displaying strenght and courage and fortitude
          and stamina and purpose.
          >
          > But that can translate into any number of conflicting and
          contradictory trajectories, right? In fact, Nietzsche's philosophy is
          more or less analogous to a scaffolding...a psychological framework
          into which practically any moral or political agenda can be stuffed.
          And how relevant is that to the actual historical evolution of
          mankind? No more relevant than, say, Kant's?
          >
          > How potent is the "will to power" in motivating people to behave as
          they do? In my view these psychological agendas always pale next to
          more basic biological drives---for food, water, clothing and shelter.
          Human beings agglomerate into communities in order to facilitate
          their subsistence---[i]as a community[/i]. And to secure a stable
          environment in which to to procreate. And to establish mechanisms for
          defending the community against enemies. The emphasis here will
          almost always be on [i]social[/i] interaction....rather than the
          point of view of any particular indivdual. Some will acquire more
          power than others, sure. But that will always be intertwined in
          social contexts that are far too complex to be "overcome" by self-
          professed Ubermensch.
          >
          > George
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > The all-new My Yahoo! – What will yours do?
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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