Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Danke, Helen

Expand Messages
  • neurom9999
    Hi, Helen, Thanks for posting the article on Kierkegaard s epilepsy, thereby making it available to those unable to download it from your link. I found it
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 9, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi, Helen,

      Thanks for posting the article on Kierkegaard's epilepsy, thereby
      making it available to those unable to download it from your link. I
      found it fascinating and enlightening. Alas, it always seems that
      great gifts in one area are accompanied by great deficits or
      affictions in another. It's intriguing that Kierkegaard seemed to
      attempt to marry his genius and his affiction into a kind of
      continuous, inseparable unity--I thought of the Yin-Yang symbol.

      My acquaintance with epilepsy is personal. My beloved Barbara had
      been afflicted with temporal partial-complex seizures during the last
      two years of her too short life. She had great gifts--especially in
      German classical music, and a heart as big as the world, as she coped
      with her epilepsy and incurable conditions of the heart and lungs.

      And my first cousin was afflicted with epilepsy for many years before
      he died in an accident. His condition included grand mal seizures.
      There was something other-worldly about holding his spasming body in
      my arms. I'd been instructed early on to be sure not to attempt to
      restrict his muscular flailings in any way--but only to protect his
      head from injury. He, too, possessed some amazing gifts.

      I wonder if you are acquainted with the extraordinary experiences of
      the science-fiction writer Philip K. Dick. Dick epitomizes the TLE
      syndrome as delineated by the Hansen's questionnaire: the "compulsive
      writing, heightened interest in religious or philosophical subjects,
      the experience of having had a divine call, the experience of having
      had a revelation, prolixity, viscosity (i.e., a tenacious or "sticky"
      state of mind), perseveration, and irritability."

      Toward the end of his life, Dick began a journal, which he called the
      Exegesis, in which he pursued ,in the most meticulous detail, the
      philosophical underpinnings of the two questions which had obsessed
      him throughout his life: What is real? and What is human? Eight
      thousand pages, mostly written in longhand.

      PKD's Exegesis has not been published in full, but Lawrence Sutin has
      edited and published: IN PURSUIT OF VALIS: SELECTIONS FROM THE
      EXEGESIS.

      The first eight chapters of Dick's novel, VALIS, pretty much set the
      context in which the Exegesis was written. Check it out, if you get
      the chance.

      I, for one, was thoroughly amazed at the literary works available
      online. At one time there were many more websites devoted to
      providing online texts, but some sites folded through lack of
      funding, and others through some freak disasters. The following are
      sites that I know are currently in operation.

      * Alex Catalogue of Electronic Texts

      http://www.infomotions.com/alex/


      * Great Books Index

      http://books.mirror.org/gb.home.html


      * The Online Medieval & Classical Library

      http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/


      * The Perseus Digital Library

      http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/


      * Project Gutenberg

      http://promo.net/pg/


      And, if you're looking to buy a particular book, the following is a
      very good search engine.

      * AddAll Book Search and Price Comparison

      http://www.addall.com/




      ----Dennis
    • helen steen
      Hi Dennis, I know little about TLE and epilepsy in general so found your mail very interesting. Perhaps Nietzsche s medical condition was a significant factor
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 10, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Dennis,
        I know little about TLE and epilepsy in general so found your mail very interesting. Perhaps Nietzsche's medical condition was a significant factor and directly related to his brilliance, this whole area is fascinating............
        Thanks for those leads and links
        Helen

        neurom9999 <neurom9999@...> wrote:
        Hi, Helen,

        Thanks for posting the article on Kierkegaard's epilepsy, thereby
        making it available to those unable to download it from your link. I
        found it fascinating and enlightening. Alas, it always seems that
        great gifts in one area are accompanied by great deficits or
        affictions in another. It's intriguing that Kierkegaard seemed to
        attempt to marry his genius and his affiction into a kind of
        continuous, inseparable unity--I thought of the Yin-Yang symbol.

        My acquaintance with epilepsy is personal. My beloved Barbara had
        been afflicted with temporal partial-complex seizures during the last
        two years of her too short life. She had great gifts--especially in
        German classical music, and a heart as big as the world, as she coped
        with her epilepsy and incurable conditions of the heart and lungs.

        And my first cousin was afflicted with epilepsy for many years before
        he died in an accident. His condition included grand mal seizures.
        There was something other-worldly about holding his spasming body in
        my arms. I'd been instructed early on to be sure not to attempt to
        restrict his muscular flailings in any way--but only to protect his
        head from injury. He, too, possessed some amazing gifts.

        I wonder if you are acquainted with the extraordinary experiences of
        the science-fiction writer Philip K. Dick. Dick epitomizes the TLE
        syndrome as delineated by the Hansen's questionnaire: the "compulsive
        writing, heightened interest in religious or philosophical subjects,
        the experience of having had a divine call, the experience of having
        had a revelation, prolixity, viscosity (i.e., a tenacious or "sticky"
        state of mind), perseveration, and irritability."

        Toward the end of his life, Dick began a journal, which he called the
        Exegesis, in which he pursued ,in the most meticulous detail, the
        philosophical underpinnings of the two questions which had obsessed
        him throughout his life: What is real? and What is human? Eight
        thousand pages, mostly written in longhand.

        PKD's Exegesis has not been published in full, but Lawrence Sutin has
        edited and published: IN PURSUIT OF VALIS: SELECTIONS FROM THE
        EXEGESIS.

        The first eight chapters of Dick's novel, VALIS, pretty much set the
        context in which the Exegesis was written. Check it out, if you get
        the chance.

        I, for one, was thoroughly amazed at the literary works available
        online. At one time there were many more websites devoted to
        providing online texts, but some sites folded through lack of
        funding, and others through some freak disasters. The following are
        sites that I know are currently in operation.

        * Alex Catalogue of Electronic Texts

        http://www.infomotions.com/alex/


        * Great Books Index

        http://books.mirror.org/gb.home.html


        * The Online Medieval & Classical Library

        http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/


        * The Perseus Digital Library

        http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/


        * Project Gutenberg

        http://promo.net/pg/


        And, if you're looking to buy a particular book, the following is a
        very good search engine.

        * AddAll Book Search and Price Comparison

        http://www.addall.com/




        ----Dennis





        Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT


        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/theexistentialsociety/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        theexistentialsociety-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • neurom9999
        I have known no man of genius who had not to pay, in some affliction or defect, either physical or spiritual, for what the gods had given him. _____________Max
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 15, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          I have known no man of genius who had not to pay, in some affliction
          or defect, either physical or spiritual, for what the gods had given
          him.
          _____________Max Beerbohm, Zuleika Dobson, 1911



          Hi, Helen,

          I feel that you have focussed on a significant point in your post to
          Bob regarding Nietzsche's contradictions, and that your observation
          applies more widely to others, too, who have come to be regarded as
          possessing "brilliance." Not only does there seem to be a
          discernable link between genius and some kind of affliction--whether
          mental, or physical, or both--but salient contradiction seems also to
          come with the territory.

          If I think about it, it doesn't seem strange to me that such would be
          the case. If a genius is a "bridge to the Superman," the early,
          tentative inklings of a mutational leap beyond Man toward a projected
          Homo Superior, then what would we expect except an individual
          maladapted, in some way, to the status quo, and possessing a bundle
          of contradictions?


          "The 'dirty secret of contemporary neuroscience': we have no idea
          what the correct level of analysis is, because there is no
          universally accepted theory of how the brain codes information."

          _________John Searle, The Mystery of Consciousness


          Pick a genius, any genius. Some theorist, somewhere, has linked that
          genius with temporal lobe epilepsy, schizoprhrenia, bi-polar
          disorder, ADHT, or whatever. In my opinion, the contemporary
          diagnostic situation is better than the era of Freudian reductionism,
          but it seems to be getting very difficult to determine where one
          neurological disorder ends, and another begins. I find it comical
          that current advertisements for drugs used in the treatment of
          neurological disorders often bear the disclaimer that "the underlying
          process is not understood."

          Here is a link to a controversial viewpoint regarding some well-known
          individuals:

          http://www.poxhistory.com/



          Frohsinn und
          Scherz Stärken
          das Herz


          ----Dennis





          --- In theexistentialsociety@yahoogroups.com, helen steen
          <hjsgermany2000@y...> wrote:
          > Hi Dennis,
          > I know little about TLE and epilepsy in general so found your mail
          very interesting. Perhaps Nietzsche's medical condition was a
          significant factor and directly related to his brilliance, this whole
          area is fascinating............
          > Thanks for those leads and links
          > Helen
          >





          Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/theexistentialsociety/
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > theexistentialsociety-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
          >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.