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California Gulch, Santa Cruz County, AZ

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  • DOUGLAS DANFORTH
    Rich Bailowitz, Tom Deecken and I visited California Gulch yesterday. This is a varied stream with a large willow lined pond at its upper end,a heavily
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 2 1:26 AM
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      Rich Bailowitz, Tom Deecken and I visited California Gulch yesterday. This is a varied stream with a large willow lined pond at its upper end,a heavily canopied stretch in the middle section and a more open sunny stretch that runs right to the Mexican border. We ended up with 35 species for the day with highlights being one Turquoise-tipped Darner and 6-8 Claw-tipped Bluet. The Claw-tipped Bluet are having a good season in SE Arizona with from one to multiple numbers at some other ponds and tanks in Santa Cruz County. The list:

      Hetaerina americana(American Rubyspot)-common
      Archilestes californica(California Spreadwing)-1
      Archilestes grandis (Great Spreadwing)-12
      Apanisagrion lais (Black and White Damsel)-26
      Argia extranea (Spine-tipped Dancer)-common
      Argia hinei(Lavender Dancer)-8
      Argia lugens(Sooty Dancer)-1
      Argia nahuana(Aztec Dancer)-2
      Argia pallens(Amethyst Dancer)-12
      Argia plana(Springwater Dancer)-3
      Enallagma civile(Familiar Bluet)-hundreds
      Enallagma praevarum(Arroyo Bluet)-common
      Enallagma semicirculare(Claw-tipped Bluet)-6-8
      Ischnura cervula(Pacific Forktail)-2
      Ischnura demorsa(Mexican Forktail)-common
      Telebasis salva(Desert Firetail)-hundreds

      Anax junius(Common Green Darner)-common
      Rhionaeschna multicolor(Blue-eyed Darner)-common
      Rhionaeschna psilus(Turquoise-tipped Darner)-1
      Erpetogomphus lampropeltis natrix(Serpent Ringtail)-1
      Erythemis collocata(Western Pondhawk)-100+
      Erythrdiplax basifusca(Plateau Dragonlet)-20
      Libellula croceipennis(Neon Skimmer)-4
      Libellula luctuosa(Widow Skimmer)-100+
      Libellula saturata(Flame Skimmer)-common
      Orthemis ferruginea(Roseate Skimmer)-1
      Pachydiplax longipennis(Blue Dasher)-50+
      Paltothemis lineatipes(Red Rock Skimmer)-11
      Pantala flavescens(Wandering Glider)-1
      Perithemis domitia(Slough Amberwng)-16
      Perithemis intensa(Mexican Amberwing)-8
      Pseudoleon superbus(Filigree Skimmer)-6
      Sympetrum corruptum(Variegated Meadowhawk)-common
      Tramea lacerata(Black Saddlebags)-6
      Tramea onusta(Red Saddlebags)-20

      Doug Danforth
      Bisbee, AZ
    • douglas danforth
      Rich Bailowitz and I checked out California Gulch yesterday. The Bidens was in full bloom attracting hundreds of butterflies so butterflies outnumbered
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 18, 2012
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        Rich Bailowitz and I checked out California Gulch yesterday. The Bidens was in full bloom attracting hundreds of butterflies so butterflies outnumbered odonates 58 species to 24. The Slough Amberwing (Perithemis domitia) represents a  new late date. I think the Tezpi Dancer (Argia tezpi) is the first reported for this year in AZ and the Fiery-eyed Dancer (Argia oenea) have been hard to find this year.

        Great Spreadwing-Archilestes
        grandis-30
        American Rubyspot-Hetaerina americana-25
        Black and Whie Damsel-Apanisagrion lais-4
        Spine-tipped Dancer-Argia extranea-40
        Lavender Dancer-Argia hinei-20
        AztecDancer-Argia nahuana-20
        Fiery-eyed Dancer-Argia oenea-12
        Amethyst Dancer-Argia pallens-5
        Springwater Dancer-Argia plana-1
        Tezpi Dancer-Argia tezpi-2
        Familiar Bluet-Enallagma civile-8
        Arroyo Bluet-Enallagma praevarum-12
        Painted Damsel-Hesperagrion heterodoxum-6
        Mexican Forktail-Ischnura demorsa-10
        Desert Firetail-Telebasis salva-30
         
        Common Green Darner-Anax junius-1
        Blue-eyed Darner-Rhionaeschna multicolor-1
        Plateau Dragonlet-Erythrodiplax basifusca-3
        Flame Skimmer-Libellula saturata-12
        Mexican Amberwing-Pertihemis intensa-28
        Slough Amberwing-Perithemis domitia-1
        Red Rock Skimmer-Paltothemis lineatipes-4
        Filigree Skimmer-Psuedoleon superbus-4
        Variegated Meadowhawk-Sympetrum
        corruptum-14

        Doug Danforth
        Bisbee,AZ


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • douglas danforth
        Yesterday  April 7th, Rich Bailowitz and I went into California Gulch. For those who have never been there, the gulch has three sections with water. The
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 8
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          Yesterday  April 7th, Rich Bailowitz and I went into California Gulch. For those who have never been there, the gulch has three sections with water. The bottom section is a running stream through willows of about a mile and reaches the border fence with Mexico. The middle section is probably only a hundred yards and includes a couple of long almost totally shaded pools. The upper section is a long lake lined with willows on one side. These three sections provide a wide variety of habitats and makes for quite a diversity of odonates. Noteworthy sightings on this trip included 3 TURQUOISE-TIPPED DARNERS (one at each section of the gulch) and 5 CERULEAN DANCERS on the bottom section of stream. This is another new locality for this amazing advance into Arizona of this species.  We had 24 species for this windy day however the wind was only a factor when we reached the lake at the upper end of the gulch in the early afternoon.

          American Rubyspot -30
          Black and White Damsel -9
          CERULEAN DANCER -5
          Spine-tipped Dancer -100+
          Lavender Dancer -12
          Aztec Dancer -20
          Amethyst Dancer -18
          Springwater Dancer -8
          Familliar Bluet -12
          Arroyo Bluet -50
          Pacific Forktail -2
          Mexican Forktail -50
          Painted Damsel -26
          Desert Firetail -11

          Common Green Darner -1
          Giant Darner -3
          Blue-eyed Darner 1
          TURQUOISE-TIPPED DARNER -3
          Pale-faced Clubskimmer -1
          Plateau Dragonlet -40
          Flame Skimmer -8
          Roseate Skimmer -4
          Mexican Amberwing -12
          Filigree Skimmer -5

          Doug Danforth
          Bisbee, AZ


        • douglas danforth
          I went to California Gulch yesterday with Tom Deecken and Jack Whetstone. Even though SE AZ had good spring rains and an early start to the monsoon season the
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 4
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            I went to California Gulch yesterday with Tom Deecken and Jack Whetstone. Even though SE AZ had good spring rains and an early start to the monsoon season the mile long stretch that runs to the Mexican border was completely DRY!!  This is a stretch that had 20 species of odonates in April. I have never seen it dry. We did find two Argia species at a wash tub sized puddle in the middle of the stream with one of them being a Tezpi Dancer! We then went a couple of miles up to the middle section of the stream which usually has a flowing stream of varying length plus three or four widely separated shaded pools. The flowing part was about thirty feet long but held three Cerulean Dancers and even though the shaded pools had nearly dried up one was still in pretty good shape with two Turquoise-tipped Darners and five Neon Skimmers highlighting the activity there. Finally we moved to the upper portion of the Gulch which is most of the time a sizable lake but yesterday it was reduced to about half its size. However activity was high at the lake and below the dam were some nice pools that added species to our list. At one pool we had one each pair of Archilestes (Great Spreadwing and California Spreadwing) ovipositing and perched on stems within six inches of each other. We then ended the day at Pena Blance Lake.(species added only at Pena Blanca are marked PB in the list)
            Here is our list of the 32 species seen for the day.

            American Rubyspot-1
            California Spreadwing -2
            Great Spreadwing-2
            Plateau Spreadwing -1
            Black-and-white Damsel -8
            CERULEAN DANCER -4
            Spine-tipped Dancer -10
            Variable Dancer -1
            Amethyst Dancer -4
            Springwater Dancer -2
            Blue-ringed Dancer -3 PB
            TEZPI DANCER -1
            Familiar Bluet -20
            Pacific Forktail -2 PB
            Desert Firetail -20
            Common Green Darner -4
            Blue-eyed Darner -2
            Turquoise-tipped Darner -2
            Black Setwing -1 PB
            Plateau Dragonlet -2
            Western Pondhawk -1 PB
            Neon Skimmer -7
            Widow Skimmer -1 PB
            Flame Skimmer -5
            Roseate Skimmer -2
            Blue Dasher -30
            Wandering Glider -3
            Spot-winged Glider -4
            Mexican Amberwing -12
            Variegated Meadowhawk -6
            Black Saddlebags -7
            Red Saddlebags -5

            Doug Danforth
            Bisbee, AZ

          • dennisrpaulson
            To me it s just amazing that certain species from the south have increased so dramatically in southeastern Arizona. Were the substantial spring rains the cause
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 4
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              To me it's just amazing that certain species from the south have increased so dramatically in southeastern Arizona. Were the substantial spring rains the cause of a general northward movement, but only in certain species? From your knowledge of Sonora, it would be interesting to come up with a list of other species common in the habitats of some of the "invading" species--Argia, Brechmorhoga, etc.--to see if there were species equally common that apparently didn't move northward or flourish in these new environments.

              The two species of Archilestes together must have been especially neat.

              Dennis Paulson


              From: "douglas danforth dougofbis@... [SoWestOdes]" <SoWestOdes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
              To: "SoWest Odes" <sowestodes@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, July 4, 2015 4:28:34 PM
              Subject: [SoWestOdes] California Gulch, Santa Cruz County, AZ

               

              I went to California Gulch yesterday with Tom Deecken and Jack Whetstone. Even though SE AZ had good spring rains and an early start to the monsoon season the mile long stretch that runs to the Mexican border was completely DRY!!  This is a stretch that had 20 species of odonates in April. I have never seen it dry. We did find two Argia species at a wash tub sized puddle in the middle of the stream with one of them being a Tezpi Dancer! We then went a couple of miles up to the middle section of the stream which usually has a flowing stream of varying length plus three or four widely separated shaded pools. The flowing part was about thirty feet long but held three Cerulean Dancers and even though the shaded pools had nearly dried up one was still in pretty good shape with two Turquoise-tipped Darners and five Neon Skimmers highlighting the activity there. Finally we moved to the upper portion of the Gulch which is most of the time a sizable lake but yesterday it was reduced to about half its size. However activity was high at the lake and below the dam were some nice pools that added species to our list. At one pool we had one each pair of Archilestes (Great Spreadwing and California Spreadwing) ovipositing and perched on stems within six inches of each other. We then ended the day at Pena Blance Lake.(species added only at Pena Blanca are marked PB in the list)
              Here is our list of the 32 species seen for the day.

              American Rubyspot-1
              California Spreadwing -2
              Great Spreadwing-2
              Plateau Spreadwing -1
              Black-and-white Damsel -8
              CERULEAN DANCER -4
              Spine-tipped Dancer -10
              Variable Dancer -1
              Amethyst Dancer -4
              Springwater Dancer -2
              Blue-ringed Dancer -3 PB
              TEZPI DANCER -1
              Familiar Bluet -20
              Pacific Forktail -2 PB
              Desert Firetail -20
              Common Green Darner -4
              Blue-eyed Darner -2
              Turquoise-tipped Darner -2
              Black Setwing -1 PB
              Plateau Dragonlet -2
              Western Pondhawk -1 PB
              Neon Skimmer -7
              Widow Skimmer -1 PB
              Flame Skimmer -5
              Roseate Skimmer -2
              Blue Dasher -30
              Wandering Glider -3
              Spot-winged Glider -4
              Mexican Amberwing -12
              Variegated Meadowhawk -6
              Black Saddlebags -7
              Red Saddlebags -5

              Doug Danforth
              Bisbee, AZ


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