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Re: [SoWestOdes] Fwd: dragonfly migration

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  • Jim Stuart
    As a newcomer to odes, I ve been asked and could not answer the following: Do we have any ode species here in the Southwest US that survive (as adults)
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 27, 2010
      As a newcomer to odes, I've been asked and could not answer the following: Do we
      have any ode species here in the Southwest US that survive (as adults)
      beyond our few months of warm weather, either by overwintering or migration to
      warmer climates? I realize that in south Texas, some species might fly virtually
      year-round, but I'm thinking of areas in our region which have a winter with
      freezing temps.
       
      Thanks, this is a great listserv.

      Jim

      James N. Stuart
      Albuquerque, NM
      jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
      http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife





      ________________________________
      From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson@...>
      To: nw_odonata@yahoogroups.com; Odonata-l <odonata-l@...>; Cal Odes
      <CalOdes@yahoogroups.com>; SoWest Odes <SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Fri, August 27, 2010 9:47:32 AM
      Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fwd: dragonfly migration

       
      Hello, all.

      Here is a report of what are surely Sympetrum corruptum moving southward along
      the Washington Cascades. Note the elevation. We often see this species in the
      mountains of Washington in the fall, usually as individuals scattered all over
      the landscape far from water, but never anything of this magnitude. I think this
      is the first evidence for a sustained directional movement of this species
      anywhere away from the Pacific Northwest coast, where it is an annual event.

      If you extrapolate from 300-500/minute, the numbers are staggering. There must
      be a lot of these dragonflies emerging from British Columbia lakes and ponds! It
      also sounds as if there was only one obvious species in the movement. We still
      have no real evidence for migration in any species in the far West but S.
      corruptum and Anax junius.

      Dennis
      -----





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dennis Paulson
      Jim, I m not sure that anyone responded to your question. We have two migratory species, Common Green Darners and Variegated Meadowhawks, but we don t really
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 30, 2010
        Jim,

        I'm not sure that anyone responded to your question.

        We have two migratory species, Common Green Darners and Variegated Meadowhawks, but we don't really know what happens at the southern end of their range in winter. Do some of them live throughout the winter and migrate back north in spring? No evidence for that, but I suppose it shouldn't be entirely discounted. Do they breed in autumn in the south, and their offspring migrate north the next spring? This is the current thinking, but not any really direct evidence for this either.

        We do know that the meadowhawks can be seen widely in the Southwest in winter away from water. On a warm day in Joshua Tree National Monument one winter I found what seemed to be mature meadowhawks in several areas, but not at the water. Others have reported them overwintering over a fairly wide area. The darners aren't so prevalent and, when seen in winter in Texas, are usually at the water. There is no question that both of these species are breeding in southern Texas in winter. Lots of odonate species are around into November and even December in that area, but after a good cold snap, most of them disappear even at that latitude. Do they all die off or go into dormancy? Lots more questions than answers.

        We badly need someone to find a population of Variegated Meadowhawks and follow it through a winter, including the capture and marking of large numbers of individuals just to see if it is the same ones you see in the same place over the course of the winter.

        Dennis

        On Aug 27, 2010, at 11:58 AM, Jim Stuart wrote:

        > As a newcomer to odes, I've been asked and could not answer the following: Do we have any ode species here in the Southwest US that survive (as adults) beyond our few months of warm weather, either by overwintering or migration to warmer climates? I realize that in south Texas, some species might fly virtually year-round, but I'm thinking of areas in our region which have a winter with freezing temps.
        >
        > Thanks, this is a great listserv.
        >
        > Jim
        >
        > James N. Stuart
        > Albuquerque, NM
        > jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
        > http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife
        >
        >
        >
        > From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson@...>
        > To: nw_odonata@yahoogroups.com; Odonata-l <odonata-l@...>; Cal Odes <CalOdes@yahoogroups.com>; SoWest Odes <SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Fri, August 27, 2010 9:47:32 AM
        > Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fwd: dragonfly migration
        >
        > Hello, all.
        >
        > Here is a report of what are surely Sympetrum corruptum moving southward along the Washington Cascades. Note the elevation. We often see this species in the mountains of Washington in the fall, usually as individuals scattered all over the landscape far from water, but never anything of this magnitude. I think this is the first evidence for a sustained directional movement of this species anywhere away from the Pacific Northwest coast, where it is an annual event.
        >
        > If you extrapolate from 300-500/minute, the numbers are staggering. There must be a lot of these dragonflies emerging from British Columbia lakes and ponds! It also sounds as if there was only one obvious species in the movement. We still have no real evidence for migration in any species in the far West but S. corruptum and Anax junius.
        >
        > Dennis
        > -----
        >
        >
        >

        -----
        Dennis Paulson
        1724 NE 98 St.
        Seattle, WA 98115
        206-528-1382
        dennispaulson@...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jim Stuart
        Thanks, I appreciate the info  ... I suspected it would be hard to say anything definitive since individual odes are hard to track. The only large
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 31, 2010
          Thanks, I appreciate the info  ... I suspected it would be hard to say anything
          definitive since individual odes are hard to track.

          The only large aggregation of Variegated Meadowhawks I've seen so far was in the
          thousands, and they all appeared to be recently emerged. It was in late June
          2009, in central Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico. Couldn't tell where they were
          going or where they came from, unless it was a mass emergence from ponds and
          marshes at this location. 
           

          Thanks,
          Jim

          James N. Stuart
          Albuquerque, NM
          jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
          http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife





          ________________________________
          From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson@...>
          To: Jim Stuart <jnstuart61@...>
          Cc: SoWest Odes <SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, August 30, 2010 8:21:25 PM
          Subject: Re: [SoWestOdes] Fwd: dragonfly migration

          Jim,

          I'm not sure that anyone responded to your question.

          We have two migratory species, Common Green Darners and Variegated Meadowhawks,
          but we don't really know what happens at the southern end of their range in
          winter. Do some of them live throughout the winter and migrate back north in
          spring? No evidence for that, but I suppose it shouldn't be entirely discounted.
          Do they breed in autumn in the south, and their offspring migrate north the next
          spring? This is the current thinking, but not any really direct evidence for
          this either.

          We do know that the meadowhawks can be seen widely in the Southwest in winter
          away from water. On a warm day in Joshua Tree National Monument one winter I
          found what seemed to be mature meadowhawks in several areas, but not at the
          water. Others have reported them overwintering over a fairly wide area. The
          darners aren't so prevalent and, when seen in winter in Texas, are usually at
          the water. There is no question that both of these species are breeding in
          southern Texas in winter. Lots of odonate species are around into November and
          even December in that area, but after a good cold snap, most of them disappear
          even at that latitude. Do they all die off or go into dormancy? Lots more
          questions than answers.

          We badly need someone to find a population of Variegated Meadowhawks and follow
          it through a winter, including the capture and marking of large numbers of
          individuals just to see if it is the same ones you see in the same place over
          the course of the winter.

          Dennis


          On Aug 27, 2010, at 11:58 AM, Jim Stuart wrote:

          As a newcomer to odes, I've been asked and could not answer the following: Do we
          have any ode species here in the Southwest US that survive (as adults)
          beyond our few months of warm weather, either by overwintering or migration to
          warmer climates? I realize that in south Texas, some species might fly virtually
          year-round, but I'm thinking of areas in our region which have a winter with
          freezing temps.

          >Thanks, this is a great listserv.
          >
          >Jim
          >
          >James N. Stuart 
          >Albuquerque, NM 
          >jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
          >http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ________________________________
          From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson@...>
          >To: nw_odonata@yahoogroups.com; Odonata-l <odonata-l@...>; Cal Odes
          ><CalOdes@yahoogroups.com>; SoWest Odes <SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Fri, August 27, 2010 9:47:32 AM
          >Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fwd: dragonfly migration
          >
          >
          >Hello, all.
          >
          >Here is a report of what are surely Sympetrum corruptum moving southward along
          >the Washington Cascades. Note the elevation. We often see this species in the
          >mountains of Washington in the fall, usually as individuals scattered all over
          >the landscape far from water, but never anything of this magnitude. I think this
          >is the first evidence for a sustained directional movement of this species
          >anywhere away from the Pacific Northwest coast, where it is an annual event.
          >
          >If you extrapolate from 300-500/minute, the numbers are staggering. There must
          >be a lot of these dragonflies emerging from British Columbia lakes and ponds! It
          >also sounds as if there was only one obvious species in the movement. We still
          >have no real evidence for migration in any species in the far West but S.
          >corruptum and Anax junius.
          >
          >Dennis
          >-----
          >
          >
          >

          -----
          Dennis Paulson
          1724 NE 98 St.
          Seattle, WA 98115
          206-528-1382
          dennispaulson@...




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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