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annual odonate surveys

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  • Dennis Paulson
    Those on CalOdes, the California odonate listserve, know all about this, but I d like to disseminate the idea. Kathy Biggs, the Odonata Central of California,
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Those on CalOdes, the California odonate listserve, know all about
      this, but I'd like to disseminate the idea.

      Kathy Biggs, the Odonata Central of California, has been encouraging
      people in the state to get out there and find all of the species
      known to occur in the state each year. She keeps a running tally of
      species reported, and this year, for example, they have reported 103
      of the 111 species known from the state. This may be the total for
      2006, as the flight season rapidly shuts down. It might prompt
      someone to ask about the status of the 8 species not seen and why
      they weren't. In most cases, it will probably be because no one
      visited the very few places they are known to occur. Alternatively,
      they were sought and couldn't be found, which might be of significance.

      This seems to be a great way to encourage people to get out in the
      field, and in addition it prompts those in the field to look for all
      species, common and rare, each year. By encouraging a search for
      every regional species, we can continue to keep track of all species
      in each state (or province, or country), an important monitoring tool
      for those that are rare or peripheral or are known to change in
      occurrence over time. And of course, the more time spent in the
      field, the more we will learn anyway.

      Are there any other regions that pursue this survey strategy?
      -----
      Dennis Paulson
      1724 NE 98 St.
      Seattle, WA 98115
      206-528-1382
      dennispaulson@...



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • chris kline
      Hi Dennis and others, Seems like (in AZ at least) the ode people aren t quite as well organized as the lep people, or maybe there just aren t as many of us.
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 3, 2006
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        Hi Dennis and others,

        Seems like (in AZ at least) the ode people aren't quite as well organized as the lep people, or maybe there just aren't as many of us.

        Here at Boyce Thompson Arboretum (Superior, AZ) we do a monthly dragonfly walk from May thru October. With that, we are able to keep track of what we have flying here locally plus make an attempt to try to get other folks jazzed about odes.

        In the near future I am wanting to structure our dragonfly program a hair differently, to create more of a "citizen science" atmosphere with the program, and hopefully encourage our participants to travel throughout AZ looking for odes.

        Something that Rich Bailowitz and I have discussed from time to time is how to get new, young people more involved in looking for odes (and other creatures too). I'm sounding like a crusty old flatulant here (all of 43!). Seems like with the advent of "state standards" and their focus on the molecular level of biology (at least in Arizona public schools), there has been a virtual abandonment of field biology.

        I think all of these tangents relate to your question of whether other states are tracking their odes.

        chris

        Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson@...> wrote:
        Those on CalOdes, the California odonate listserve, know all about
        this, but I'd like to disseminate the idea.

        Kathy Biggs, the Odonata Central of California, has been encouraging
        people in the state to get out there and find all of the species
        known to occur in the state each year. She keeps a running tally of
        species reported, and this year, for example, they have reported 103
        of the 111 species known from the state. This may be the total for
        2006, as the flight season rapidly shuts down. It might prompt
        someone to ask about the status of the 8 species not seen and why
        they weren't. In most cases, it will probably be because no one
        visited the very few places they are known to occur. Alternatively,
        they were sought and couldn't be found, which might be of significance.

        This seems to be a great way to encourage people to get out in the
        field, and in addition it prompts those in the field to look for all
        species, common and rare, each year. By encouraging a search for
        every regional species, we can continue to keep track of all species
        in each state (or province, or country), an important monitoring tool
        for those that are rare or peripheral or are known to change in
        occurrence over time. And of course, the more time spent in the
        field, the more we will learn anyway.

        Are there any other regions that pursue this survey strategy?
        -----
        Dennis Paulson
        1724 NE 98 St.
        Seattle, WA 98115
        206-528-1382
        dennispaulson@...

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        If you wait for perfect conditions, you will never get anything done.
        Chris Kline
        Senior Instructional Specialist
        Boyce Thompson Arboretum
        37615 U.S. Highway 60
        Superior, Arizona 85273
        (520) 689-2723

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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