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Spot-winged Gliders

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  • chris kline
    Good morning, The Spot-winged Gliders are back! Last year these bugs were pretty common at the Arboretum but until this morning I hadn t seen a single one for
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 19, 2006
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      Good morning,

      The Spot-winged Gliders are back! Last year these bugs were pretty common at the Arboretum but until this morning I hadn't seen a single one for 2006. Come in this morning and there are at least six trapped in the sky lights of our visitor center. Was able to rescue three.

      Does anybody know the biology of these guys? Do they tend to emerge mid-summer? Do they ride the monsoons to different locations like some butterflies do? I just find it odd that we haven't seen any all year and suddenly overnight they are coming out of the wood work.

      chris


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Randy Emmitt
      Chris, All, Just about a week ago I saw my first Spot-winged Glider of the season too, it was in Durham, NC. The place I saw it was at a traffic light
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 19, 2006
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        Chris, All,

        Just about a week ago I saw my first Spot-winged Glider of the season too,
        it was in Durham, NC. The place I saw it was at a traffic light attempting
        to ovaposit on the hood of my van, the day before at this light I had a
        Wandering Glider doing the same thing at the same traffic light. Usually we
        don't see Spot-wings until the end of June here in the Southeastern US.

        Cheers,
        Randy Emmitt
        My nature photography blog http://rlephoto.com/pblog/index.php
        Public Nature blog http://rlephoto.com/cblog/ Logins available to upload
        photos.


        At 11:01 AM 7/19/2006, chris kline wrote:

        >Good morning,
        >
        >The Spot-winged Gliders are back! Last year these bugs were pretty common
        >at the Arboretum but until this morning I hadn't seen a single one for
        >2006. Come in this morning and there are at least six trapped in the sky
        >lights of our visitor center. Was able to rescue three.
        >
        >Does anybody know the biology of these guys? Do they tend to emerge
        >mid-summer? Do they ride the monsoons to different locations like some
        >butterflies do? I just find it odd that we haven't seen any all year and
        >suddenly overnight they are coming out of the wood work.
        >
        >chris
      • Robert Larsen
        Hi Chris, Here are some observations over the past few weeks on the Spot-winged Glider in southeastern New Mexico. They seem to emerge in great numbers at the
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 19, 2006
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          Hi Chris,

          Here are some observations over the past few weeks on
          the Spot-winged Glider in southeastern New Mexico.
          They seem to emerge in great numbers at the onset of
          the monsoon rains here in the first or second week of
          July. Generally, our monsoon starts with a high
          pressure over central Texas and a low pressure are
          over the Four Corners (NE Arizona) with afternoon
          thundershowers moving to the northeast. The
          Spot-winged Gliders move along with the air mass
          circulating around the high bringing in moisture from
          the Gulf of Mexico.

          They all seem to emerge in the Central Pecos Valley
          from wetlands along the Pecos; from farm and hatchery
          ponds; and the many gypsum sink holes and many cattle
          tanks. The folks at the Dexter National Fish Hatchery
          brought a bush so covered with the exuviae of the
          Spot-winged Gliders that it looked like ice crystals
          had formed on the bush. Their movement seems to be
          more dispersal than migration north and south, and
          they may be able to reproduce more than one generation
          in a single season as the larvae are found in
          ephemeral pools and playa lakes after the monsoon
          rains.

          On the 7th and 8th of July all the Spot-wings were
          moving to the northeast, and a person in Texas
          reported dragonflies moving south in the Hill Country
          of Texas on the other side of the high pressure area.
          So, they seem to move in numbers with the air mass
          around the high.

          On the 14th while driving to the V.A. Clinic in
          Artesia, New Mexico (45 miles) with the high over
          central Arizona all of the Spot-wings were moving to
          the southwest by the thousands across Highway 285
          along with some Wandering Gliders and Black
          Saddlebags. All moving with the air mass in a
          clockwise direction around the high.

          On Sunday the 16th on a drive to Fort Sumner, New
          Mexico (90 miles) thousands of Spot-winged gliders
          were crossing all along Highway 285 and Highway 20
          moving due west off to the west out of the Pecos
          Valley. These were moving with a counter clockwise
          air mass moving across southern New Mexico and Arizona
          from a tropical storm over the central Mexican State
          of Chihuahua. At sunset thousands of glittering wings
          of the Spot-wings were seen hawking for insects over a
          single field on the McMillan farm in Fort Sumner.
          And, yesterday the 18th, the rangers at Fort Sumner
          reported having to brake for clouds of Spot-wings
          emerging from the great oxbow in Bosque Redondo Park
          all moving to the northwest across the road northeast
          of the park, and that the Western Kingbirds and
          Yellow-billed Cuckoo's were having a hayday feeding on
          the Gliders.

          Robert Larsen
          Roswell, New Mexico

          --- chris kline <kline_at_pine@...> wrote:

          > Good morning,
          >
          > The Spot-winged Gliders are back! Last year these
          > bugs were pretty common at the Arboretum but until
          > this morning I hadn't seen a single one for 2006.
          > Come in this morning and there are at least six
          > trapped in the sky lights of our visitor center.
          > Was able to rescue three.
          >
          > Does anybody know the biology of these guys? Do
          > they tend to emerge mid-summer? Do they ride the
          > monsoons to different locations like some
          > butterflies do? I just find it odd that we haven't
          > seen any all year and suddenly overnight they are
          > coming out of the wood work.
          >
          > chris
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been
          > removed]
          >
          >


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