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New finds for Lea County, New Mexico

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  • Robert Larsen
    The goal of our visit to the ephemeral pools in Lea County was to repeat and document observations of a little known flight mechanism used by tadpole shrimp
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 3, 2004
      The goal of our visit to the ephemeral pools in Lea
      County was to repeat and document observations of a
      little known flight mechanism used by tadpole shrimp
      for dispersal during the migratory period associated
      with monsoon rains. Migratory beetles, Dytiscidae and
      Hydrophilidae, visit the ephemeral pools to feed, then
      leave the pools with their feathered hind legs
      encrusted with shrimp cysts (eggs) which are
      transported to other ponds, playa lakes and ephemeral
      pools on the Llano Estacado.

      Odonata noted over eight years visiting and
      ovipositing in ephemeral pools and numerous temporary
      playa lakes during the monsoon migratory period on the
      Llano Estacado are Orthemis ferruginea, Sympetrum
      corruptum, Anax junius, Tramea lacerata, Pantala
      hymenaea, Pantala flavescens, Argia alberta, Ischnura
      barberi, Ischnura hastata, Lestes alacer, Lestes
      rectangularis, and perhaps Lestes sigma once reproted
      for New Mexico in 1929. Argia alberta, Ischnura
      barberi, and Ischnura hastata show reproductive
      behavior known for long-range migrants at the onset of
      the monsoon rains (mature males in wheel with teneral
      and immature females).

      Some new finds for Lea County, New Mexico:

      Mescalero Shield-back Katydid (Plagiostira
      mescaleroensis)
      Males and females too numerous to count
      East side of Lane Salt Lake
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 629136E 3704264N (WGS84/NAD83)
      USGS Lane Salt Lake Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Larsen

      Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile)
      Male taken, east side of Lane Salt Lake
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 629136E 3704264N (WGS84/NAD83)
      USGS Lane Lake Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Larsen

      Plateau Spreadwing (Lestes alacer)
      Male & Female in wheel position taken
      Playa east of Lane Salt Lake on
      County Road 156, tank pond east of road
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 625195E 3701089N (WGS84/NAD83)
      USGS Caprock Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Larsen

      Texan Clam Shrimp (Eulimnadia texana)
      10+ Hermaphrodits and males taken
      on first curve CR 156 north of HW 380
      ephemeral pools east of road
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 624349E 3695905N (WGS84/NAD83)
      USGS Caprock Quad.
      July 31, 2004 G. Wrrick, R. Larsen

      Tadpole Shrimp (Triops sp.)
      Numerous specimens taken
      first curve on CR 156 north of HW 380
      ephemeral pool east of raod
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 634349E 3695905N (WGS83/NAD83)
      USGS Caprock Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Laren

      Tadpole Shrimp (Lepidurus sp.)
      several Lepidurus observed in
      ephemeral pools east of road
      first curve on CR 156 north of HW 380
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 634349E 3695905N (WGS84/NAD83)
      USGS Caprock Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Larsen

      Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis)
      Male observed, extra long abdomen with
      key features and coloration
      on grass at small seep east of Lane
      Salt Lake below cattle tanks.
      Lea County, New Mexico
      UTM 13 628610E 3704793N (WGS83/NAD83)
      USGS Lane Salt Lake Quad
      July 31, 2004 G. Warrick, R. Larsen


      -----------------------

      Notes: At Lane Salt Lake about six miles northeast of
      the shrimp site we came acorss literally hundreds of
      millions of intact salt pickled and sun dired beetles
      and grasshoppers of every conceivable kind along the
      high water mark of the salt lake and all retaining
      their color. A very conservative estemate of the
      dried insects along the six miles of the lakes
      perimeter would be in excess of 95,000 pounds (47
      tons) of dried insects. The most notable among them
      was the New Mexico endemic Mescalero Shield-back
      Katiydid (Plagiostira mescaleroensis). This katydid
      was thought to be restricted to Mescalero Dunes in
      Chaves County, but the Lane Salt Lake is in Lea
      County. The insects appear to have been washed into
      the highly saline lake during the last few weeks in
      flash floods and have become pickled and dried.

      =====
      Robert R. Larsen
      906 E. Orange St.
      Roswell, New Mexico 88201-7440
      USA


      Phone: 1-505-623-5548
      Regular e-mail: roblrsn@...




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