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Re: [SoWestOdes] 13-14 October 2012: Muleshoe Ranch, Cochise Co., AZ

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  • Kathy & Dave Biggs
    Fantastic outing, and getting to share it with your wife, sweet!! Life seems good!! Since I track SW Flight data, I can add these comments. WHITE-TAILED SYLPH
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 15, 2012
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      Fantastic outing, and getting to share it with your wife, sweet!!
      Life seems good!!
      Since I track SW Flight data, I can add these comments.

      WHITE-TAILED SYLPH - new late date for AZ and all SW (by exactly a month)
      MAYAN SETWING - new late date for AZ and all SW
      of course, since they haven't been found in any other SWestern state, that explains it!!

      Dull here in Northern CA - not an Ode to be found.
      Kathy


      California Dragonflies www.sonic.net/dragonfly
      Southwest Dragonflies www.southwestdragonflies.net/
      Bigsnest Wildlife Pond www.bigsnestpond.net/
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      Kathy and Dave Biggs bigsnest@... 707-823-2911
      308 Bloomfield Rd. Sebastopol, CA 95472
      On 10/15/2012 5:46 PM, pierredeviche wrote:
      > 13 & 14 October 2012
      >
      >
      >
      > My wife Dany and I spent last weekend at the Muleshoe Ranch Nature
      > Conservancy Area, Cochise Co., AZ, where we visited the Ranch
      > headquarter pond, Bass Canyon, Hot Springs Canyon, and Double Ranch
      > Canyon (see
      >
      > http://azdragonfly.net/location/muleshoe-ranch
      > <http://azdragonfly.net/location/muleshoe-ranch> for location
      > information.)
      >
      >
      >
      > We found 33 species (complete list below), including
      >
      > - One male WHITE-TAILED SYLPH. This observation provides the
      > second record of the species for the USA (1st record: San Bernardino,
      > AZ, 2007); see White-tailed Sylph <http://azdragonfly.net/news/335>
      >
      > - MAYAN SETWINGS: new late flying date for species in AZ; see
      > Mayan Setwing <http://azdragonfly.net/news/336>
      >
      >
      > - SLOUGH AMBERWING: new late flying date for species in AZ;
      >
      > - SPOT-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: close to the northern limit of the
      > species' distribution; see Spot-winged Meadowhawk
      > <http://azdragonfly.net/news/337>
      >
      > - 10 dancer species, inc. PIMA DANCERS; see Pima Dancer
      > <http://azdragonfly.net/species/pima-dancer>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Also of note, a male Aztec Dancer, A. nahuana, presenting an elongated
      > black stripe on the second abdominal segment. This mark (as compared to
      > a round spot) is normally characteristic of California Dancer, A.
      > agrioides (Paulson 2009). See Aztec Dancer
      > <http://azdragonfly.net/news/338>
      >
      >
      >
      > See http://azdragonfly.net <http://azdragonfly.net/> for more pictures
      > and other information.
      >
      >
      >
      > List of species seen Oct 13-14:
      >
      > 1. Malachite Darner, Remartinia luteipennis: 1
      > 2. Serpent Ringtail, Erpetogomphus lampropeltis: 7
      > 3. Pale-faced Clubskimmer, Brechmorhoga mendax: 3
      > 4. Variegated Meadowhawk, Sympetrum corruptum: 6
      > 5. SPOT-WINGED MEADOWHAWK, Sympetrum signiferum: 1 male
      > 6. Red Rock Skimmer, Paltothemis lineatipes: common
      > 7. Flame Skimmer, Libellula saturata: common
      > 8. Neon Skimmer, Libellula croceipennis: common
      > 9. Roseate Skimmer, Orthemis ferruginea: 2
      > 10. MAYAN SETWING, Dythemis maya: 10-15 males, 1 female
      > 11. Red Saddlebags, Tramea onusta: 1
      > 12. WHITE-TAILED SYLPH, Macrothemis pseudimitans: 1 male
      > 13. Mexican Amberwing, Perithemis intensa: 2 males
      > 14. SLOUGH AMBERWING, Perithemis domitia: 1 male
      >
      >
      >
      > 1. Painted Damsel, Hesperagrion heterodoxum: 25
      > 2. Black-and-White Damsel: Apanisagrion lais: 20
      > 3. Familiar Bluet, Enallagma civile: 1 male
      > 4. Arroyo Bluet, Enallagma praevarum: common
      > 5. Springwater Dancer, Argia plana: common
      > 6. Spine-tipped Dancer, Argia extranea: 15
      > 7. Lavender Dancer, Argia hinei: common
      > 8. Aztec Dancer, Argia nahuana: 2+ males
      > 9. Fiery-eyed Dancer, Argia oenea: common
      > 10. Sooty Dancer, Argia lugens: 15
      > 11. Tarascan Dancer, Argia tarascana: 30
      > 12. Sierra Madre Dancer, Argia lacrimans: 3 males
      > 13. PIMA DANCER, Argia pima: 2 males
      > 14. Amethyst Dancer, Argia pallens: 4
      > 15. American Rubyspot, Hetaerina americana: 1 male
      > 16. Canyon Rubyspot, Hetaerina vulnerata: common
      > 17. Desert Forktail, Telebasis salva: 20
      > 18. Mexican Forktail, Ischnura demorsa: < 5
      > 19. Great Spreadwings, Archilestes grandis: common
      >
      >
      >
      > Pierre Deviche, Phoenix, AZ.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jim Johnson
      Pierre, A couple years ago I found that the color of some of the major veins is different between those two species, although I haven t been able to field test
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 15, 2012
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        Pierre,



        A couple years ago I found that the color of some of the major veins is
        different between those two species, although I haven't been able to field
        test it much since then since I don't see either species very often.



        Anyway, some of the major veins on Aztec (A. nahuana) are lighter brown than
        the other veins while on California (A. agrioides) all of the veins are more
        or less uniform in color/tone. And it seems to work for both sexes, not just
        males. I wrote about this in the newsletter Argia and I also have a page
        explaining the distinction here:
        http://odonata.bogfoot.net/photo-pages/id_Argia_agrioides-nahuana.htm In
        your close-up of the agrioides-like nahuana those golden veins are apparent.




        I'd like to hear from others who see one or both species on a regular basis
        how well this difference holds up and how well it works as a field mark
        (e.g. through binoculars).



        Jim Johnson

        Vancouver, Washington





        From: SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of pierredeviche
        Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 5:46 PM
        To: SoWestOdes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SoWestOdes] 13-14 October 2012: Muleshoe Ranch, Cochise Co., AZ






        13 & 14 October 2012

        My wife Dany and I spent last weekend at the Muleshoe Ranch Nature
        Conservancy Area, Cochise Co., AZ, where we visited the Ranch
        headquarter pond, Bass Canyon, Hot Springs Canyon, and Double Ranch
        Canyon (see

        http://azdragonfly.net/location/muleshoe-ranch
        <http://azdragonfly.net/location/muleshoe-ranch> for location
        information.)

        We found 33 species (complete list below), including

        - One male WHITE-TAILED SYLPH. This observation provides the
        second record of the species for the USA (1st record: San Bernardino,
        AZ, 2007); see White-tailed Sylph <http://azdragonfly.net/news/335>

        - MAYAN SETWINGS: new late flying date for species in AZ; see
        Mayan Setwing <http://azdragonfly.net/news/336>

        - SLOUGH AMBERWING: new late flying date for species in AZ;

        - SPOT-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: close to the northern limit of the
        species' distribution; see Spot-winged Meadowhawk
        <http://azdragonfly.net/news/337>

        - 10 dancer species, inc. PIMA DANCERS; see Pima Dancer
        <http://azdragonfly.net/species/pima-dancer>

        Also of note, a male Aztec Dancer, A. nahuana, presenting an elongated
        black stripe on the second abdominal segment. This mark (as compared to
        a round spot) is normally characteristic of California Dancer, A.
        agrioides (Paulson 2009). See Aztec Dancer
        <http://azdragonfly.net/news/338>

        See http://azdragonfly.net <http://azdragonfly.net/> for more pictures
        and other information.

        List of species seen Oct 13-14:

        1. Malachite Darner, Remartinia luteipennis: 1
        2. Serpent Ringtail, Erpetogomphus lampropeltis: 7
        3. Pale-faced Clubskimmer, Brechmorhoga mendax: 3
        4. Variegated Meadowhawk, Sympetrum corruptum: 6
        5. SPOT-WINGED MEADOWHAWK, Sympetrum signiferum: 1 male
        6. Red Rock Skimmer, Paltothemis lineatipes: common
        7. Flame Skimmer, Libellula saturata: common
        8. Neon Skimmer, Libellula croceipennis: common
        9. Roseate Skimmer, Orthemis ferruginea: 2
        10. MAYAN SETWING, Dythemis maya: 10-15 males, 1 female
        11. Red Saddlebags, Tramea onusta: 1
        12. WHITE-TAILED SYLPH, Macrothemis pseudimitans: 1 male
        13. Mexican Amberwing, Perithemis intensa: 2 males
        14. SLOUGH AMBERWING, Perithemis domitia: 1 male

        1. Painted Damsel, Hesperagrion heterodoxum: 25
        2. Black-and-White Damsel: Apanisagrion lais: 20
        3. Familiar Bluet, Enallagma civile: 1 male
        4. Arroyo Bluet, Enallagma praevarum: common
        5. Springwater Dancer, Argia plana: common
        6. Spine-tipped Dancer, Argia extranea: 15
        7. Lavender Dancer, Argia hinei: common
        8. Aztec Dancer, Argia nahuana: 2+ males
        9. Fiery-eyed Dancer, Argia oenea: common
        10. Sooty Dancer, Argia lugens: 15
        11. Tarascan Dancer, Argia tarascana: 30
        12. Sierra Madre Dancer, Argia lacrimans: 3 males
        13. PIMA DANCER, Argia pima: 2 males
        14. Amethyst Dancer, Argia pallens: 4
        15. American Rubyspot, Hetaerina americana: 1 male
        16. Canyon Rubyspot, Hetaerina vulnerata: common
        17. Desert Forktail, Telebasis salva: 20
        18. Mexican Forktail, Ischnura demorsa: < 5
        19. Great Spreadwings, Archilestes grandis: common

        Pierre Deviche, Phoenix, AZ.

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