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camera question

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  • Dennis Paulson
    Hello, all. On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were, both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 12, 2012
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      Hello, all.

      On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were, both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future foreign trips.

      So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called "bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and others. Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with similar questions.

      Please excuse the cross-posting.

      Dennis
      -----
      Dennis Paulson
      1724 NE 98 St.
      Seattle, WA 98115
      206-528-1382
      dennispaulson@...





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ann Cooper
      Hello, I have experience with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50 bridge camera and have had some good results over several years--but not to match those taken with
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 12, 2012
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        Hello,

        I have experience with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50 bridge camera and have had some good results over several years--but not to match those taken with DSLRs. The camera is adaptable to conditions, relatively light, and has a ring focus (on manual focus) and ring zoom control (optical x12. I believe the newer Lumix has toggle controls.

        I started to feel severe screen envy for a larger LCD and so recently got the Nikon Coolpix P510, which came highly recommended. It has a lovely screen, but I found the toggle controls almost impossible to adjust quickly and accurately, so although the camera was light and compact, and sometimes got excellent results, I missed a lot of shots. Auto focus was painfully slow if the background had any clutter at all and manual focus was fiddly. So was switching between screen and viewfinder. I ended up trading this camera in after three months' trial.

        I now await delivery of a FujiFinepix HS30EXR bridge camera--and will go back to a ring focus and an eye-recognition devise that changes from screen to viewfinder when you put your eye to the viewfinder. Can't wait to try it.

        However, I aspire to a real (read DSLR) setup when I'm close to home to see if I can achieve photographs worthy of the odes--if I can ever decide the best combo of camera body and lens to settle on..

        Ann Cooper
        Wordswild@...

        ---- Original Message -----
        From: Dennis Paulson
        To: Odonata-l ; NEOdes Odes ; SE Odonata ; great lakes odes ; Texas Odes ; dragonfly listserve ; California Dragonfly and Damselfly Sightings CalOdes ; nw_odonata@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 11:35 AM
        Subject: [SoWestOdes] camera question



        Hello, all.

        On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were, both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future foreign trips.

        So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called "bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and others. Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with similar questions.

        Please excuse the cross-posting.

        Dennis
        -----
        Dennis Paulson
        1724 NE 98 St.
        Seattle, WA 98115
        206-528-1382
        dennispaulson@...

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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