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Saddlebags in Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico

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  • Jim Stuart
     Hi all: Bob Larsen prodded me to send a quick note on Tramea to the listserv. Although Black Saddlebags (T. lacerata) has been documented (via OdonataCentral
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 18, 2011
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       Hi all:

      Bob Larsen prodded me to send a quick note on Tramea to the listserv. Although Black Saddlebags (T. lacerata) has been documented (via OdonataCentral and the Dot Map Project) as being widespread and common in most of New Mexico, we have had few records of our other two Tramea in central New Mexico. I've posted my recent photo-records of Tramea on OC, but here's a quick summary:

      Tramea onusta (Red Saddlebags) -- As of today, we have new county records of this species from 4 counties in the Rio Grande Valley just since 2009 (not 2008 as I incorrectly posted on OC): Socorro, Valencia (today), Bernalillo, and Sandoval counties. I'm tempted to think this represents a recent range expansion northward in the valley from southern New Mexico, unless this distinctive species has simply been overlooked until recently or records of  its occurrence in the valley have not been published or posted. I have a few places in Santa Fe County (the next one north) where I plan to watch for this species so we'll see if additional records can be obtained this summer.

      Tramea calverti (Striped Saddlebags) -- This species was found at or near Bosque del Apache Refuge, Socorro County starting in 2007. My observations last summer suggest it frequents moist-soil areas with shallow flooding of spikerush and other short wetland emergents. Moist soil areas are managed for at this refuge but are relatively uncommon in many parts of the Rio Grande Valley (especially this year due to drought). I hope to check a few such sites this summer to see if calverti is more widespread in the valley than records would indicate. The location in Valencia County where I found T. onusta has some excellent shallowly-flooded  moist-soil habitat that I was unable to survey today but which could support T. calverti.

      BTW, for those members who are photoing odes in NM, please remember to send your records to OC.



      Thanks,
      Jim

      James N. Stuart
      Albuquerque, NM
      jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
      http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kathy &/or Dave Biggs
      Thanks Jim, I used your data to update the SW maps on my SW Dragonflies website. Usually I just have to wait a year and then to a search for new records each
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 20, 2011
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        Thanks Jim,
        I used your data to update the SW maps on my SW Dragonflies website.
        Usually I just have to wait a year and then to a search for new records
        each January at Odonata Central. This helps me keep the website current.
        Cheers!!
        Kathy Biggs

        --
        California Dragonflies http://www.sonic.net/dragonfly
        Southwest Dragonflies http://southwestdragonflies.net/
        Bigsnest Wildlife Pond http://www.bigsnestpond.net/
        ----------------------------------------------------------------
        Kathy and Dave Biggs bigsnest@... 707-823-2911
        308 Bloomfield Rd. Sebastopol, CA 95472

        dba Azalea Creek Publishing azalea@... fax:707-823-2911
        http://www.sonic.net/~bigsnest/azaleacreekpublishing/








        Jim Stuart wrote:

        > Hi all:
        >
        >Bob Larsen prodded me to send a quick note on Tramea to the listserv. Although Black Saddlebags (T. lacerata) has been documented (via OdonataCentral and the Dot Map Project) as being widespread and common in most of New Mexico, we have had few records of our other two Tramea in central New Mexico. I've posted my recent photo-records of Tramea on OC, but here's a quick summary:
        >
        >Tramea onusta (Red Saddlebags) -- As of today, we have new county records of this species from 4 counties in the Rio Grande Valley just since 2009 (not 2008 as I incorrectly posted on OC): Socorro, Valencia (today), Bernalillo, and Sandoval counties. I'm tempted to think this represents a recent range expansion northward in the valley from southern New Mexico, unless this distinctive species has simply been overlooked until recently or records of its occurrence in the valley have not been published or posted. I have a few places in Santa Fe County (the next one north) where I plan to watch for this species so we'll see if additional records can be obtained this summer.
        >
        >Tramea calverti (Striped Saddlebags) -- This species was found at or near Bosque del Apache Refuge, Socorro County starting in 2007. My observations last summer suggest it frequents moist-soil areas with shallow flooding of spikerush and other short wetland emergents. Moist soil areas are managed for at this refuge but are relatively uncommon in many parts of the Rio Grande Valley (especially this year due to drought). I hope to check a few such sites this summer to see if calverti is more widespread in the valley than records would indicate. The location in Valencia County where I found T. onusta has some excellent shallowly-flooded moist-soil habitat that I was unable to survey today but which could support T. calverti.
        >
        >BTW, for those members who are photoing odes in NM, please remember to send your records to OC.
        >
        >
        >
        >Thanks,
        >Jim
        >
        >James N. Stuart
        >Albuquerque, NM
        >jnstuart61 AT yahoo.com
        >http://flickr.com/photos/stuartwildlife
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
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