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Re: [SoCalFire]

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  • wayne
    From: Glenn Jenkins Date: 2003/09/01 Mon AM 08:34:16 HST To: SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, TankerLocations@yahoogroups.com,
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1 12:11 PM
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      From: Glenn Jenkins <keestrokes@...>
      Date: 2003/09/01 Mon AM 08:34:16 HST
      To: SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, TankerLocations@yahoogroups.com, CalFireHelicopters@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SoCalFire]

      Helitanker 735 is now based at Hemet-Ryan. Arrived today. It also just got assigned to fires on Tahoe National Forest. Well at least Hemet is now the only "CDF MegaBase" in California.



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    • iparky1962
      looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in the past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 2 2:04 PM
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        looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in the
        past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.
      • Los Angeles Fire Department
        ... the ... This was a topic among many in SAFER this weekend, as well as appearing on the AP wires. It also made the web in a number of venues. I found this
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 2 3:15 PM
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          --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, "iparky1962" <iparky1962@y...>
          wrote:
          > looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in
          the
          > past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.

          This was a topic among many in SAFER this weekend, as well as
          appearing on the AP wires. It also made the web in a number of
          venues. I found this one via Yahoo by simply using the term "fire
          shelter":

          The San Francisco Chronicle
          SEPTEMBER 1, 2003, MONDAY, FINAL EDITION

          Suddenly trapped by flames, more than 50 firefighters battling a
          wildfire in Alameda County this weekend survived by staying put --
          covering themselves with rarely used fire tents that they keep on
          their waistbands as a last resort, a fire official said Sunday.
          The incident occurred early Friday morning as 53 firefighters --
          including a working crew of inmates -- were securing a fire line in
          the Devil fire south of Livermore, one of six active Bay Area
          wildfires caused by lightning strikes during a storm last Monday.

          Just after 1 a.m., the firefighters were surprised when nearby
          flames -- expected to diminish in the cool, moist night air -- grew
          and suddenly surrounded them, said Capt. Mike Carr of the California
          Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention.

          The firefighters realized they could not reach a designated safety
          zone, so they began to clear the area around them.
          The fire, however, was approaching too fast. The 53 firefighters were
          instructed to use their fire shelters -- devices that some
          firefighters never have to use in a career, Carr said. The shelters
          have an aluminum coating that repels heat.

          While crews on two bulldozers in the area were able to simply stay
          inside the vehicles, everyone else huddled close and draped their
          shelters over their bodies. In the next 15 minutes, the fire raged
          through and away from the area. Two firefighters suffered second-
          degree burns to their elbows, probably from embers that were swirling
          around and settling on the ground, Carr said.

          "It was a very fortunate outcome to an extremely difficult
          situation," Carr said. "It's great because every year firefighters
          are trained on how to use these shelters . . . We train daily for
          situations like this hoping we never have to use the training.

          "The fire shelters are a last resort, and the decision is made with a
          lot of careful consideration."

          Meanwhile, officials said Sunday that they were close to cornering
          the lightning blazes, and might have all the fires contained by today.

          The fires, which have burned more than 30,000 acres of remote, steep
          land in Alameda, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties since last
          Monday, were 75 percent contained late Sunday, said Carr. No
          structures have been damaged.

          Four of the six fires were totally contained, allowing firefighters
          to concentrate on the Annie fire in Stanislaus County, which has
          burned 17,000 acres, and the Devil fire in Alameda County, which has
          burned more than 5,000 acres.

          More than 2,350 people from several fire departments have fought the
          blazes, with 152 fire engines, 46 bulldozers to plow fire lines, 13
          helicopters, and 14 water tenders. The fire had cost the CDF $5.6
          million as of Sunday, officials said.

          There was also a close call at the Annie fire on Wednesday, officials
          said. CDF bulldozer operator T.C. Durden was digging a fire line near
          a dirt road at about 8 p.m. when he spotted two men driving by in a
          pickup truck. They were headed straight into an unsecured area, on
          their way to a remote cabin after a fishing trip.

          Durden, 41, of Bonny Doon, convinced the men to turn around, and was
          able to get helicopters to drop water near their truck -- which still
          got scorched on one side -- as he escorted them away. Flames rose
          more than 50 feet in the air in the area where the truck was
          originally headed, Durden said.

          "They were a little bit argumentative at the time. It took a little
          bit of convincing on my part to get them to turn around," Durden
          said. "They thanked me later.

          # # #
        • wayne johnston
          It sounds like you need one of these :-))))) http://www.adi-limited.com/2-02-030-030-000.html it can withstand up to 1000.c and any falling debris ...
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 2 9:51 PM
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            It sounds like you need one of these :-)))))
            http://www.adi-limited.com/2-02-030-030-000.html
            it can withstand up to 1000.c and any falling debris
            Los Angeles Fire Department wrote:

            > --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, "iparky1962" <iparky1962@y...>
            > wrote:
            > > looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in
            > the
            > > past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.
            >
            > This was a topic among many in SAFER this weekend, as well as
            > appearing on the AP wires. It also made the web in a number of
            > venues. I found this one via Yahoo by simply using the term "fire
            > shelter":
            >
            > The San Francisco Chronicle
            > SEPTEMBER 1, 2003, MONDAY, FINAL EDITION
            >
            > Suddenly trapped by flames, more than 50 firefighters battling a
            > wildfire in Alameda County this weekend survived by staying put --
            > covering themselves with rarely used fire tents that they keep on
            > their waistbands as a last resort, a fire official said Sunday.
            > The incident occurred early Friday morning as 53 firefighters --
            > including a working crew of inmates -- were securing a fire line in
            > the Devil fire south of Livermore, one of six active Bay Area
            > wildfires caused by lightning strikes during a storm last Monday.
            >
            > Just after 1 a.m., the firefighters were surprised when nearby
            > flames -- expected to diminish in the cool, moist night air -- grew
            > and suddenly surrounded them, said Capt. Mike Carr of the California
            > Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention.
            >
            > The firefighters realized they could not reach a designated safety
            > zone, so they began to clear the area around them.
            > The fire, however, was approaching too fast. The 53 firefighters were
            > instructed to use their fire shelters -- devices that some
            > firefighters never have to use in a career, Carr said. The shelters
            > have an aluminum coating that repels heat.
            >
            > While crews on two bulldozers in the area were able to simply stay
            > inside the vehicles, everyone else huddled close and draped their
            > shelters over their bodies. In the next 15 minutes, the fire raged
            > through and away from the area. Two firefighters suffered second-
            > degree burns to their elbows, probably from embers that were swirling
            > around and settling on the ground, Carr said.
            >
            > "It was a very fortunate outcome to an extremely difficult
            > situation," Carr said. "It's great because every year firefighters
            > are trained on how to use these shelters . . . We train daily for
            > situations like this hoping we never have to use the training.
            >
            > "The fire shelters are a last resort, and the decision is made with a
            > lot of careful consideration."
            >
            > Meanwhile, officials said Sunday that they were close to cornering
            > the lightning blazes, and might have all the fires contained by today.
            >
            > The fires, which have burned more than 30,000 acres of remote, steep
            > land in Alameda, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties since last
            > Monday, were 75 percent contained late Sunday, said Carr. No
            > structures have been damaged.
            >
            > Four of the six fires were totally contained, allowing firefighters
            > to concentrate on the Annie fire in Stanislaus County, which has
            > burned 17,000 acres, and the Devil fire in Alameda County, which has
            > burned more than 5,000 acres.
            >
            > More than 2,350 people from several fire departments have fought the
            > blazes, with 152 fire engines, 46 bulldozers to plow fire lines, 13
            > helicopters, and 14 water tenders. The fire had cost the CDF $5.6
            > million as of Sunday, officials said.
            >
            > There was also a close call at the Annie fire on Wednesday, officials
            > said. CDF bulldozer operator T.C. Durden was digging a fire line near
            > a dirt road at about 8 p.m. when he spotted two men driving by in a
            > pickup truck. They were headed straight into an unsecured area, on
            > their way to a remote cabin after a fishing trip.
            >
            > Durden, 41, of Bonny Doon, convinced the men to turn around, and was
            > able to get helicopters to drop water near their truck -- which still
            > got scorched on one side -- as he escorted them away. Flames rose
            > more than 50 feet in the air in the area where the truck was
            > originally headed, Durden said.
            >
            > "They were a little bit argumentative at the time. It took a little
            > bit of convincing on my part to get them to turn around," Durden
            > said. "They thanked me later.
            >
            > # # #
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor


            >
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            > SoCalFire-Owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • bb911
            Shelters don t help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this situation.- -- In
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 3 10:23 AM
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              Shelters don't help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only
              help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this
              situation.-

              -- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, wayne johnston <waynejohnston@i...>
              wrote:
              > It sounds like you need one of these :-)))))
              > http://www.adi-limited.com/2-02-030-030-000.html
              > it can withstand up to 1000.c and any falling debris
              > Los Angeles Fire Department wrote:
              >
              > > --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, "iparky1962" <iparky1962@y...>
              > > wrote:
              > > > looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in
              > > the
              > > > past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.
              > >
              > > This was a topic among many in SAFER this weekend, as well as
              > > appearing on the AP wires. It also made the web in a number of
              > > venues. I found this one via Yahoo by simply using the term "fire
              > > shelter":
              > >
            • Don Root
              ... Well, the idea is you deploy them in the black areas, and hopefully the actual time exposed to the super heated air is minimal. Beats the heck out of the
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 3 10:28 AM
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                bb911 wrote:

                > Shelters don't help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only
                > help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this
                > situation.-

                Well, the idea is you deploy them in the black areas, and hopefully
                the actual time exposed to the super heated air is minimal. Beats the
                heck out of the alternatives...

                Don
              • bb911
                I understand. There just not the siver bullet of safety that some imagine. Have seen several fire docs on tv in which firefighters died screaming in those
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 3 10:57 AM
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                  I understand. There just not the "siver bullet" of safety that some
                  imagine. Have seen several fire docs on tv in which firefighters died
                  screaming in those reflective tents. Thanks.
                  --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, Don Root <k6cdo@c...> wrote:
                  > bb911 wrote:
                  >
                  > > Shelters don't help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only
                  > > help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this
                  > > situation.-
                  >
                  > Well, the idea is you deploy them in the black areas, and hopefully
                  > the actual time exposed to the super heated air is minimal. Beats
                  the
                  > heck out of the alternatives...
                  >
                  > Don
                • wayne johnston
                  Did anybody look at the link? it s a truck! and a very tough one at that ... ADVERTISEMENT [click here] ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 3 11:16 AM
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                    Did anybody look at the link? it's a truck! and a very tough one at that
                    :-))

                    bb911 wrote:

                    > Shelters don't help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only
                    > help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this
                    > situation.-
                    >
                    > -- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, wayne johnston <waynejohnston@i...>
                    > wrote:
                    > > It sounds like you need one of these :-)))))
                    > > http://www.adi-limited.com/2-02-030-030-000.html
                    > > it can withstand up to 1000.c and any falling debris
                    > > Los Angeles Fire Department wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, "iparky1962" <iparky1962@y...>
                    > > > wrote:
                    > > > > looking for information on a poss shelter deployment up north in
                    >
                    > > > the
                    > > > > past couple of days. When, where, and poss circumstances.
                    > > >
                    > > > This was a topic among many in SAFER this weekend, as well as
                    > > > appearing on the AP wires. It also made the web in a number of
                    > > > venues. I found this one via Yahoo by simply using the term "fire
                    > > > shelter":
                    > > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    ADVERTISEMENT
                    [click here]

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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Mike Meadows
                    the shelters do help in some cases but your right..In a raging forest or heavy brush area, they may be of little help...however, it is better then nothing.....
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 3 12:37 PM
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                      the shelters do help in some cases but your right..In a raging forest or
                      heavy brush area, they may be of little help...however, it is better
                      then nothing.....

                      bb911 wrote:

                      > I understand. There just not the "siver bullet" of safety that some
                      > imagine. Have seen several fire docs on tv in which firefighters died
                      > screaming in those reflective tents. Thanks.
                      > --- In SoCalFire@yahoogroups.com, Don Root <k6cdo@c...> wrote:
                      > > bb911 wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > Shelters don't help much re: breathing in super heated air. Only
                      > > > help protect otherwise. Must have been light fuels in this
                      > > > situation.-
                      > >
                      > > Well, the idea is you deploy them in the black areas, and hopefully
                      > > the actual time exposed to the super heated air is minimal. Beats
                      > the
                      > > heck out of the alternatives...
                      > >
                      > > Don
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor


                      >
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                      > SoCalFire-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


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