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The battle of Mt. Sterling Kentucky 1864

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  • Tarver Snedecor
    Hello Cousins I ve been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928 9428) was supposed to have
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 16, 2008
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      Hello Cousins
          I've been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928  9428)  was supposed to have taken part in a civil war battle in Mr. Sterling Kentucky when he was just a young teenager.  I never spoke to him of course as he died before I was born, but this is the story as my father passed it on to me.  He was going to school  in Mt. Sterling during the war. 
       
       

       

      The Southern sympathizers did not sit idly by during the Union occupation. A guerilla band was organized, and Bully and Albert acted as guides for them many times as they knew the countryside very well.

      On one occasion, the guerrillas spotted a company of Union soldiers camped in the valley below.  They decided they would attack in the middle of the night while the camp was sleeping.  Bully and Albert were determined to go with the guerillas when they attacked.  The attack was a complete success, as the Yankees were completely surprised, many fleeing in only their sleeping attire.  During the melee, the boys made off with the best prize they could imagine: the Union Captain's boots and sword.  Their victory was short lived however, as the two were soon captured by theUnion forces as they regrouped.  They were put in the Yankee Stockade while they figured out what to do with the young scamps.  Fortunately, a relative was one of the Union officers in the area and they were released.  Their quarters were a stable that had been commandeered by the Yankees.  Their guard came by and said he was going to turn his back for a few minuets and when he came back, he didn’t want to see hide nor hair of them again. Bolly and Albert didn't have to be told twice.  As soon as the guard's back was turned, they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.

       
       
      Well, he got pretty close, but it wasn't a gorilla band but a  cavalry troop of Confederates led by Gen John Hunt Morgan.   They were sometimes called Morgan's raiders.   Here is one historical account of the battles. 
       
       
      Morgan’s Last Kentucky Raid, June 2nd-12th, 1864— Leading 1,400 cavalry and 800 dismounted men, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan comes through Pound Gap, passes down Troublesome Creek, and raids Mount Sterling , capturing 380 Union soldiers.  Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge is leading a large Federal force up the Big Sandy Valley , and the purpose of Morgan’s raid is to divert Burbridge from his objective, Preston’s Saltworks at Saltville , Virginia . At Mount Sterling Morgan’s men steal and plunder, taking $80,000 from the Farmer’s Branch Bank.

      Battle of Mount Sterling,  June 9th, 1864
      —General Burbridge and his troopers make an extraordinary 90-mile march from the Forks of Beaver Creek to Mount Sterling , where they launch a surprise pre-dawn attack on Morgan’s dismounted men, trampling them as they are sleeping in their tents.  A desperate fight ensues, and the Confederates are defeated. Confederate losses are 54 killed, 120 wounded, and 150 captured. Union losses are 8 killed, 20 wounded, and 50 missing.
       
       My note
          It looks like her turned the tables on Morgan and did the same thing that he had done a day or two before.  Morgan regrouped after the defeat and went to his home town of Lexington  Kentucky , his home town, and captured it and took 1000 horses.  He was later defeated again when his troops ran out of ammunition.  Lexington was a prosperous growing young city. Someone who lived there at the same time was Mary Todd, a beautiful southern bell.  When she was grown she went to Springfield Illinois to live with her sister.  There she met and was courted by a tall, gangly, somewhat homely lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. 
      It was also the home of Henry Clay, who was a prominent politician of his day. 
      Morgan was kelled later that year when he was again raiding in Tennessee. 
      Just thought you might be interested
      Tarver Snedecor
       
    • Walt C. Snedeker
      Tarver, While I was researching for The Book Of Snedekers, one of the Family sent me three bits of history about your branch... in particular, about Bolly and
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 17, 2008
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        Tarver,

        While I was researching for The Book Of Snedekers, one of the Family sent me three bits of history about your branch... in particular, about Bolly and Tarver.  There was documentation with this treasure trove.  Alas, it was lost in the confusion of the mix of the death of my step-father (who lived with us) at the same time as we were moving.

        There were actual quotes that had been recorded.  They can be found here:  http://home.earthlink.net/~waltsned/bolltarv.html

        There are further quotes that are simply wonderful.  I no longer have the documentation (and if any cousin can come up with them, I would be SO grateful!!).  These quotes come from the time when Tarver was a judge in Texas.  A sort of Judge Roy Bean, actually. :-)

        From Court records (quoting from memory):

        "The Defendant accused the Court of being biased.  The Court rendered the Defendant unconscious with a law book."

        Again (from memory) is the incident at the Tarver farm (and again, I hope a cousin can come up with the documentation of these court records): 

        A man was working on the Tarver place... He had a foul mouth -- and used it in hearing of the children.   Tarver,(a deacon in the church) told the man to get off his property and never come back.  The man left, but returned two days later.  Tarver shot him off his saddle.

        The Court records (from memory, remember):

        "You told this man to get off your property and never return?"

        "I did."

        "And he returned?"

        "He did."

        "And you shot him?"

        "I did."

        Case closed. 

        Justice and law were simpler in those days.  PLEASE!  ANYONE WHO HAS THIS DOCUMENTATION, OR CAN FIND IT!!!

        Tarver Snedecor wrote:

        Hello Cousins
            I've been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928  9428)  was supposed to have taken part in a civil war battle in Mr. Sterling Kentucky when he was just a young teenager.  I never spoke to him of course as he died before I was born, but this is the story as my father passed it on to me.  He was going to school  in Mt. Sterling during the war. 
         
         

         

        The Southern sympathizers did not sit idly by during the Union occupation. A guerilla band was organized, and Bully and Albert acted as guides for them many times as they knew the countryside very well.

        On one occasion, the guerrillas spotted a company of Union soldiers camped in the valley below.  They decided they would attack in the middle of the night while the camp was sleeping.  Bully and Albert were determined to go with the guerillas when they attacked.  The attack was a complete success, as the Yankees were completely surprised, many fleeing in only their sleeping attire.  During the melee, the boys made off with the best prize they could imagine: the Union Captain's boots and sword.  Their victory was short lived however, as the two were soon captured by the Union forces as they regrouped.  They were put in the Yankee Stockade while they figured out what to do with the young scamps.  Fortunately, a relative was one of the Union officers in the area and they were released.  Their quarters were a stable that had been commandeered by the Yankees.  Their guard came by and said he was going to turn his back for a few minuets and when he came back, he didn’t want to see hide nor hair of them again. Bolly and Albert didn't have to be told twice.  As soon as the guard's back was turned, they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.

         
         
        Well, he got pretty close, but it wasn't a gorilla band but a  cavalry troop of Confederates led by Gen John Hunt Morgan.   They were sometimes called Morgan's raiders.   Here is one historical account of the battles. 
         
         
        Morgan’s Last Kentucky Raid, June 2nd-12th, 1864— Leading 1,400 cavalry and 800 dismounted men, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan comes through Pound Gap, passes down Troublesome Creek, and raids Mount Sterling , capturing 380 Union soldiers.  Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge is leading a large Federal force up the Big Sandy Valley , and the purpose of Morgan’s raid is to divert Burbridge from his objective, Preston’s Saltworks at Saltville , Virginia . At Mount Sterling Morgan’s men steal and plunder, taking $80,000 from the Farmer’s Branch Bank.

        Battle of Mount Sterling,  June 9th, 1864
        —General Burbridge and his troopers make an extraordinary 90-mile march from the Forks of Beaver Creek to Mount Sterling , where they launch a surprise pre-dawn attack on Morgan’s dismounted men, trampling them as they are sleeping in their tents.  A desperate fight ensues, and the Confederates are defeated. Confederate losses are 54 killed, 120 wounded, and 150 captured. Union losses are 8 killed, 20 wounded, and 50 missing.
         
         My note
            It looks like her turned the tables on Morgan and did the same thing that he had done a day or two before.  Morgan regrouped after the defeat and went to his home town of Lexington  Kentucky , his home town, and captured it and took 1000 horses.  He was later defeated again when his troops ran out of ammunition.  Lexington was a prosperous growing young city. Someone who lived there at the same time was Mary Todd, a beautiful southern bell.  When she was grown she went to Springfield Illinois to live with her sister.  There she met and was courted by a tall, gangly, somewhat homely lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. 
        It was also the home of Henry Clay, who was a prominent politician of his day. 
        Morgan was kelled later that year when he was again raiding in Tennessee. 
        Just thought you might be interested
        Tarver Snedecor
         
      • Tarver Snedecor
        Many thanks Walt for the information. It is a version that I had never heard. It corresponds a lot with my version, but is different. I m pretty sure he
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 17, 2008
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          Many thanks Walt for the information.  It is a version that I had never heard.  It corresponds a  lot with my version, but is different.   I'm pretty sure he was in Kentucky.  I just read another interesting fact about the Morgan's raid.  After the war the president of the bank sued a Lt. Witherspoon for $56,000.00 that was taken from the bank.  It didn't say, but I suppose he was a Kentuckian that fought for the Confederacy.  He was awarded the money but the appeals court overturned it.  It said that taking money in the time of war was not a crime.  If it was, Gen Sherman would owe a lot of prople a lot of money.  something else I didn't know.  Morgan earlier had raided all the way up in Indiana and Ohio, against his commander's orders.  He was finally deafed and captured.  The farmers and businessmen of Ohio and Indiana filled a claim against the Federal government for over $500,000.00  and was awarded compensation.  Of couse that wasn't available to southern States.  I'm not sue what border States like Kentucky and Missouri was. 
          Thanks again  I appreciate any information on my family. 
          Tarver
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2008 6:35 AM
          Subject: Re: [SnedekerCousins] The battle of Mt. Sterling Kentucky 1864

          Tarver,

          While I was researching for The Book Of Snedekers, one of the Family sent me three bits of history about your branch... in particular, about Bolly and Tarver.  There was documentation with this treasure trove.  Alas, it was lost in the confusion of the mix of the death of my step-father (who lived with us) at the same time as we were moving.

          There were actual quotes that had been recorded.  They can be found here:  http://home. earthlink. net/~waltsned/ bolltarv. html

          There are further quotes that are simply wonderful.  I no longer have the documentation (and if any cousin can come up with them, I would be SO grateful!!).  These quotes come from the time when Tarver was a judge in Texas.  A sort of Judge Roy Bean, actually. :-)

          From Court records (quoting from memory):

          "The Defendant accused the Court of being biased.  The Court rendered the Defendant unconscious with a law book."

          Again (from memory) is the incident at the Tarver farm (and again, I hope a cousin can come up with the documentation of these court records): 

          A man was working on the Tarver place... He had a foul mouth -- and used it in hearing of the children.   Tarver,(a deacon in the church) told the man to get off his property and never come back.  The man left, but returned two days later.  Tarver shot him off his saddle.

          The Court records (from memory, remember):

          "You told this man to get off your property and never return?"

          "I did."

          "And he returned?"

          "He did."

          "And you shot him?"

          "I did."

          Case closed. 

          Justice and law were simpler in those days.  PLEASE!  ANYONE WHO HAS THIS DOCUMENTATION, OR CAN FIND IT!!!

          Tarver Snedecor wrote:

          Hello Cousins
              I've been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928  9428)  was supposed to have taken part in a civil war battle in Mr. Sterling Kentucky when he was just a young teenager.  I never spoke to him of course as he died before I was born, but this is the story as my father passed it on to me.  He was going to school  in Mt. Sterling during the war. 
           
           

           

          The Southern sympathizers did not sit idly by during the Union occupation. A guerilla band was organized, and Bully and Albert acted as guides for them many times as they knew the countryside very well.

          On one occasion, the guerrillas spotted a company of Union soldiers camped in the valley below.  They decided they would attack in the middle of the night while the camp was sleeping.  Bully and Albert were determined to go with the guerillas when they attacked.  The attack was a complete success, as the Yankees were completely surprised, many fleeing in only their sleeping attire.  During the melee, the boys made off with the best prize they could imagine: the Union Captain's boots and sword.  Their victory was short lived however, as the two were soon captured by the Union forces as they regrouped.  They were put in the Yankee Stockade while they figured out what to do with the young scamps.  Fortunately, a relative was one of the Union officers in the area and they were released.  Their quarters were a stable that had been commandeered by the Yankees.  Their guard came by and said he was going to turn his back for a few minuets and when he came back, he didn’t want to see hide nor hair of them again. Bolly and Albert didn't have to be told twice.  As soon as the guard's back was turned, they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.

           
           
          Well, he got pretty close, but it wasn't a gorilla band but a  cavalry troop of Confederates led by Gen John Hunt Morgan.   They were sometimes called Morgan's raiders.   Here is one historical account of the battles. 
           
           
          Morgan’s Last Kentucky Raid, June 2nd-12th, 1864— Leading 1,400 cavalry and 800 dismounted men, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan comes through Pound Gap, passes down Troublesome Creek, and raids Mount Sterling , capturing 380 Union soldiers.  Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge is leading a large Federal force up the Big Sandy Valley , and the purpose of Morgan’s raid is to divert Burbridge from his objective, Preston’s Saltworks at Saltville , Virginia . At Mount Sterling Morgan’s men steal and plunder, taking $80,000 from the Farmer’s Branch Bank.

          Battle of Mount Sterling,  June 9th, 1864
          —General Burbridge and his troopers make an extraordinary 90-mile march from the Forks of Beaver Creek to Mount Sterling , where they launch a surprise pre-dawn attack on Morgan’s dismounted men, trampling them as they are sleeping in their tents.  A desperate fight ensues, and the Confederates are defeated. Confederate losses are 54 killed, 120 wounded, and 150 captured. Union losses are 8 killed, 20 wounded, and 50 missing.
           
           My note
              It looks like her turned the tables on Morgan and did the same thing that he had done a day or two before.  Morgan regrouped after the defeat and went to his home town of Lexington  Kentucky , his home town, and captured it and took 1000 horses.  He was later defeated again when his troops ran out of ammunition.  Lexington was a prosperous growing young city. Someone who lived there at the same time was Mary Todd, a beautiful southern bell.  When she was grown she went to Springfield Illinois to live with her sister.  There she met and was courted by a tall, gangly, somewhat homely lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. 
          It was also the home of Henry Clay, who was a prominent politician of his day. 
          Morgan was kelled later that year when he was again raiding in Tennessee. 
          Just thought you might be interested
          Tarver Snedecor
           

        • sharon mckeon
          Oh My God!! It runs in the family!!! We lived on a small ranch and raised horses at one time. We had a new blacksmith come to shoe one of the horses who was
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 17, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Oh My God!! It runs in the family!!! We lived on a small ranch and raised horses at one time. We had a new blacksmith come to shoe one of the horses who was very mellow. When I walked out to the barn to check the new blacksmith, the hoof it had in his hand was dripping blood( known as quicking a horse) When I asked what the h-- he thought he was doing, the blacksmith replied that all horses hooves had to be trimmed to the quick. Since I was 5"7' and the blacksmith was 6"2', I returned to the house, picked up my son's 22 rifle and went back to the barn to accost the blacksmith. I pointed the rifle at him, told him to gather up his tools, get in his truck and get the h-- off my ranch becuase nobody "quicks" my horses.  He took one look at a very angry woman with a rifle, picked up his tools and hightailed it to his truck never to be seen again.  My kids still laugh over the story. We Snedeker's never fail to challenge something that is wrong!

            Sharon McKeon
            Home: 808-986-0987
            CA Cell: 510-914-3420
             



            To: SnedekerCousins@yahoogroups.com
            From: waltsned@...
            Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2008 07:35:59 -0400
            Subject: Re: [SnedekerCousins] The battle of Mt. Sterling Kentucky 1864

            Tarver,

            While I was researching for The Book Of Snedekers, one of the Family sent me three bits of history about your branch... in particular, about Bolly and Tarver.  There was documentation with this treasure trove.  Alas, it was lost in the confusion of the mix of the death of my step-father (who lived with us) at the same time as we were moving.

            There were actual quotes that had been recorded.  They can be found here:  http://home. earthlink. net/~waltsned/ bolltarv. html

            There are further quotes that are simply wonderful.  I no longer have the documentation (and if any cousin can come up with them, I would be SO grateful!!).  These quotes come from the time when Tarver was a judge in Texas.  A sort of Judge Roy Bean, actually. :-)

            From Court records (quoting from memory):

            "The Defendant accused the Court of being biased.  The Court rendered the Defendant unconscious with a law book."

            Again (from memory) is the incident at the Tarver farm (and again, I hope a cousin can come up with the documentation of these court records): 

            A man was working on the Tarver place... He had a foul mouth -- and used it in hearing of the children.   Tarver,(a deacon in the church) told the man to get off his property and never come back.  The man left, but returned two days later.  Tarver shot him off his saddle.

            The Court records (from memory, remember):

            "You told this man to get off your property and never return?"

            "I did."

            "And he returned?"

            "He did."

            "And you shot him?"

            "I did."

            Case closed. 

            Justice and law were simpler in those days.  PLEASE!  ANYONE WHO HAS THIS DOCUMENTATION, OR CAN FIND IT!!!

            Tarver Snedecor wrote:


            Hello Cousins
                I've been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928  9428)  was supposed to have taken part in a civil war battle in Mr. Sterling Kentucky when he was just a young teenager.  I never spoke to him of course as he died before I was born, but this is the story as my father passed it on to me.  He was going to school  in Mt. Sterling during the war. 
             
             

             

            The Southern sympathizers did not sit idly by during the Union occupation. A guerilla band was organized, and Bully and Albert acted as guides for them many times as they knew the countryside very well.

            On one occasion, the guerrillas spotted a company of Union soldiers camped in the valley below.  They decided they would attack in the middle of the night while the camp was sleeping.  Bully and Albert were determined to go with the guerillas when they attacked.  The attack was a complete success, as the Yankees were completely surprised, many fleeing in only their sleeping attire.  During the melee, the boys made off with the best prize they could imagine: the Union Captain's boots and sword.  Their victory was short lived however, as the two were soon captured by the Union forces as they regrouped.  They were put in the Yankee Stockade while they figured out what to do with the young scamps.  Fortunately, a relative was one of the Union officers in the area and they were released.  Their quarters were a stable that had been commandeered by the Yankees.  Their guard came by and said he was going to turn his back for a few minuets and when he came back, he didn’t want to see hide nor hair of them again. Bolly and Albert didn't have to be told twice.  As soon as the guard's back was turned, they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.

             
             
            Well, he got pretty close, but it wasn't a gorilla band but a  cavalry troop of Confederates led by Gen John Hunt Morgan.   They were sometimes called Morgan's raiders.   Here is one historical account of the battles. 
             
             
            Morgan’s Last Kentucky Raid, June 2nd-12th, 1864— Leading 1,400 cavalry and 800 dismounted men, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan comes through Pound Gap, passes down Troublesome Creek, and raids Mount Sterling, capturing 380 Union soldiers.  Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge is leading a large Federal force up the Big Sandy Valley, and the purpose of Morgan’s raid is to divert Burbridge from his objective, Preston’s Saltworks at Saltville, Virginia. At Mount Sterling Morgan’s men steal and plunder, taking $80,000 from the Farmer’s Branch Bank.

            Battle of Mount Sterling,  June 9th, 1864
            —General Burbridge and his troopers make an extraordinary 90-mile march from the Forks of Beaver Creek to Mount Sterling, where they launch a surprise pre-dawn attack on Morgan’s dismounted men, trampling them as they are sleeping in their tents.  A desperate fight ensues, and the Confederates are defeated. Confederate losses are 54 killed, 120 wounded, and 150 captured. Union losses are 8 killed, 20 wounded, and 50 missing.
             
             My note
                It looks like her turned the tables on Morgan and did the same thing that he had done a day or two before.  Morgan regrouped after the defeat and went to his home town of Lexington  Kentucky , his home town, and captured it and took 1000 horses.  He was later defeated again when his troops ran out of ammunition.  Lexington was a prosperous growing young city. Someone who lived there at the same time was Mary Todd, a beautiful southern bell.  When she was grown she went to Springfield Illinois to live with her sister.  There she met and was courted by a tall, gangly, somewhat homely lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. 
            It was also the home of Henry Clay, who was a prominent politician of his day. 
            Morgan was kelled later that year when he was again raiding in Tennessee. 
            Just thought you might be interested
            Tarver Snedecor
             



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          • Walt C. Snedeker
            I just re-read this sequence of notes. I just LOVE our nutberg Family!!! ... I just re-read this sequence of notes. I just LOVE our nutberg Family!!! sharon
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 23, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              I just re-read this sequence of notes.

              I just LOVE our nutberg Family!!!

              sharon mckeon wrote:

              Oh My God!! It runs in the family!!! We lived on a small ranch and raised horses at one time. We had a new blacksmith come to shoe one of the horses who was very mellow. When I walked out to the barn to check the new blacksmith, the hoof it had in his hand was dripping blood( known as quicking a horse) When I asked what the h-- he thought he was doing, the blacksmith replied that all horses hooves had to be trimmed to the quick. Since I was 5"7' and the blacksmith was 6"2', I returned to the house, picked up my son's 22 rifle and went back to the barn to accost the blacksmith. I pointed the rifle at him, told him to gather up his tools, get in his truck and get the h-- off my ranch becuase nobody "quicks" my horses.  He took one look at a very angry woman with a rifle, picked up his tools and hightailed it to his truck never to be seen again.  My kids still laugh over the story. We Snedeker's never fail to challenge something that is wrong!

              Sharon McKeon
              Home: 808-986-0987
              CA Cell: 510-914-3420
               



              To: SnedekerCousins@ yahoogroups. com
              From: waltsned@earthlink. net
              Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2008 07:35:59 -0400
              Subject: Re: [SnedekerCousins] The battle of Mt. Sterling Kentucky 1864

              Tarver,

              While I was researching for The Book Of Snedekers, one of the Family sent me three bits of history about your branch... in particular, about Bolly and Tarver.  There was documentation with this treasure trove.  Alas, it was lost in the confusion of the mix of the death of my step-father (who lived with us) at the same time as we were moving.

              There were actual quotes that had been recorded.  They can be found here:  http://home. earthlink. net/~waltsned/ bolltarv. html

              There are further quotes that are simply wonderful.  I no longer have the documentation (and if any cousin can come up with them, I would be SO grateful!!).  These quotes come from the time when Tarver was a judge in Texas.  A sort of Judge Roy Bean, actually. :-)

              From Court records (quoting from memory):

              "The Defendant accused the Court of being biased.  The Court rendered the Defendant unconscious with a law book."

              Again (from memory) is the incident at the Tarver farm (and again, I hope a cousin can come up with the documentation of these court records): 

              A man was working on the Tarver place... He had a foul mouth -- and used it in hearing of the children.   Tarver,(a deacon in the church) told the man to get off his property and never come back.  The man left, but returned two days later.  Tarver shot him off his saddle.

              The Court records (from memory, remember):

              "You told this man to get off your property and never return?"

              "I did."

              "And he returned?"

              "He did."

              "And you shot him?"

              "I did."

              Case closed. 

              Justice and law were simpler in those days.  PLEASE!  ANYONE WHO HAS THIS DOCUMENTATION, OR CAN FIND IT!!!

              Tarver Snedecor wrote:


              Hello Cousins
                  I've been doing some research on an incident in the early life of my Grandfather Bolivar George Snedecor ( 1850-1928  9428)  was supposed to have taken part in a civil war battle in Mr. Sterling Kentucky when he was just a young teenager.  I never spoke to him of course as he died before I was born, but this is the story as my father passed it on to me.  He was going to school  in Mt. Sterling during the war. 
               
               

               

              The Southern sympathizers did not sit idly by during the Union occupation. A guerilla band was organized, and Bully and Albert acted as guides for them many times as they knew the countryside very well.

              On one occasion, the guerrillas spotted a company of Union soldiers camped in the valley below.  They decided they would attack in the middle of the night while the camp was sleeping.  Bully and Albert were determined to go with the guerillas when they attacked.  The attack was a complete success, as the Yankees were completely surprised, many fleeing in only their sleeping attire.  During the melee, the boys made off with the best prize they could imagine: the Union Captain's boots and sword.  Their victory was short lived however, as the two were soon captured by the Union forces as they regrouped.  They were put in the Yankee Stockade while they figured out what to do with the young scamps.  Fortunately, a relative was one of the Union officers in the area and they were released.  Their quarters were a stable that had been commandeered by the Yankees.  Their guard came by and said he was going to turn his back for a few minuets and when he came back, he didn’t want to see hide nor hair of them again. Bolly and Albert didn't have to be told twice.  As soon as the guard's back was turned, they ran as fast as their legs could carry them.

               
               
              Well, he got pretty close, but it wasn't a gorilla band but a  cavalry troop of Confederates led by Gen John Hunt Morgan.   They were sometimes called Morgan's raiders.   Here is one historical account of the battles. 
               
               
              Morgan’s Last Kentucky Raid, June 2nd-12th, 1864— Leading 1,400 cavalry and 800 dismounted men, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan comes through Pound Gap, passes down Troublesome Creek, and raids Mount Sterling, capturing 380 Union soldiers.  Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge is leading a large Federal force up the Big Sandy Valley, and the purpose of Morgan’s raid is to divert Burbridge from his objective, Preston’s Saltworks at Saltville, Virginia. At Mount Sterling Morgan’s men steal and plunder, taking $80,000 from the Farmer’s Branch Bank.

              Battle of Mount Sterling,  June 9th, 1864
              —General Burbridge and his troopers make an extraordinary 90-mile march from the Forks of Beaver Creek to Mount Sterling, where they launch a surprise pre-dawn attack on Morgan’s dismounted men, trampling them as they are sleeping in their tents.  A desperate fight ensues, and the Confederates are defeated. Confederate losses are 54 killed, 120 wounded, and 150 captured. Union losses are 8 killed, 20 wounded, and 50 missing.
               
               My note
                  It looks like her turned the tables on Morgan and did the same thing that he had done a day or two before.  Morgan regrouped after the defeat and went to his home town of Lexington  Kentucky , his home town, and captured it and took 1000 horses.  He was later defeated again when his troops ran out of ammunition.  Lexington was a prosperous growing young city. Someone who lived there at the same time was Mary Todd, a beautiful southern bell.  When she was grown she went to Springfield Illinois to live with her sister.  There she met and was courted by a tall, gangly, somewhat homely lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. 
              It was also the home of Henry Clay, who was a prominent politician of his day. 
              Morgan was kelled later that year when he was again raiding in Tennessee. 
              Just thought you might be interested
              Tarver Snedecor
               



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