Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

slide type carborator

Expand Messages
  • jjpier54
    In one of the postings it mentions useing a slide type carberater. I am not familiar with this type. Anyone have any information on these, who makes them and
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      In one of the postings it mentions useing a slide type carberater. I
      am not familiar with this type. Anyone have any information on these,
      who makes them and what makes them better specifically. Jeff
    • harveyking2002
      These are carbs that are typicaly used on motorcycle and newer (last 15 yr.) snow moble engines. Need separate fuel pump if not gravety feed. (fuel tank higher
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        These are carbs that are typicaly used on motorcycle and newer (last
        15 yr.) snow moble engines. Need separate fuel pump if not gravety
        feed. (fuel tank higher than carb.)
        Dick



        --- In Small4-strokeEngines@y..., "jjpier54" <jjpier@a...> wrote:
        > In one of the postings it mentions useing a slide type carberater.
        I
        > am not familiar with this type. Anyone have any information on
        these,
        > who makes them and what makes them better specifically. Jeff
      • Joe Cook
        Further to what Dick offered, on motorcycles and snowmobiles these slide carbs have a needle that is attached to the bottom of the slide and controls the
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Further to what Dick offered, on motorcycles and snowmobiles these slide
          carbs have a needle that is attached to the bottom of the "slide" and
          controls the mid-range air/fuel mixture when the throttle is less than
          wide open. The throttle action is provided by the slide being raised by
          the throttle cable and opening the bore of the carb for air flow. At
          wide open throttle, the small needle is the only obstruction in the
          inlet area.

          These slide carbs come in two varieties, the "flat slide" which is what
          Dick has mentioned, and their claim to fame, I think, is lower opening
          force, and the other type is the "cylindrical slide" which is the
          original (older) type. They are manufactured by Bing (used on Rotax 2
          strokes), Mikuni, etal.

          FWIW, I think the SU "slide carb" of the original message is actually
          more correctly called a "constant velocity" or CV carb and was used on
          most British cars in the post-war ira until fuel injection became
          universal. Both my Triumphs (a TR3 and a Spitfire) had SU's. It has a
          slide and attached jet needle like the slide carbs but that mechanism is
          driven by a diaphragm or piston that raises the slide in accordance with
          the vacuum sensed. This type carb has a throttle plate on the engine
          side of the carb that actually controls the air flow, the slide/needle
          controls the mixture.

          IMHO, the SU would be an excellent carb for small 4 strokes, e.g., the
          Mil surplus types, since their tuning is less sensitive to the size of
          the engine and the needle jet can be tuned is an external stop nut. In
          addition, they were equipped with a "mixture enrichment" mechanism that
          lowered the needle jet with a lever for cold starting, in lieu of a
          choke, and could be used for mixture control vs. altitude when used on
          aircraft.

          Joe

          harveyking2002 wrote:
          >
          > These are carbs that are typicaly used on motorcycle and newer (last
          > 15 yr.) snow moble engines. Need separate fuel pump if not gravety
          > feed. (fuel tank higher than carb.)
          > Dick
          >
          > --- In Small4-strokeEngines@y..., "jjpier54" <jjpier@a...> wrote:
          > > In one of the postings it mentions useing a slide type carberater.
          > I
          > > am not familiar with this type. Anyone have any information on
          > these,
          > > who makes them and what makes them better specifically. Jeff
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.