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Little Diesels

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  • deansigler1
    I love the concept of using the little industrial engines this group advocates for small, potentially practical aircraft. Here s a thought that s been running
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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      I love the concept of using the little industrial engines this group
      advocates for small, potentially practical aircraft. Here's a
      thought that's been running through my mind for many years.

      There are a growing number of small industrial diesels, heavier than
      an equivalent Honda or B&S V-twin, but providing the benefits of
      diesel - low fuel consumption, the impossibility of an ignition
      failure, etc.

      Check out one example, the Yanmar 2V78V. It's a v-twin, liquid-
      cooled, and puts out 16.1 to 20.1 hp at 2,800 to 3,600 rpm. Best of
      all, if I read the specs right, it weighs 125.6 pounds with a
      standard radiator. There is one drawback. It's available as a
      vertical shaft engine,

      A diesel-powered craft in a long-winged craft could be a great
      mileage maker. The Dieselis gets 70 mpg at 99 mph with two on
      board. Think of a single-seater that could fly on 1/2 gph or less.
      The Yanmar has a specific fuel consumption of .192 pounds per
      hp/hour, making full-power consumption about .54 gph of diesel.
      With most of the bigger gas v-twins burning about 2 gph, this may
      become significant. Better yet, you could buy biodiesel and be free
      of middle-eastern oil.

      Dean Sigler
    • Scott Perkins
      There was a mercedes diesel engine powering a small Trike at SunFun It was taken from a vehicle called the Smart Car. Scott
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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        There was a mercedes diesel engine powering a small Trike
        at SunFun

        It was taken from a vehicle called the "Smart" Car.
        Scott

        deansigler1 wrote:
        >
        > I love the concept of using the little industrial engines this group
        > advocates for small, potentially practical aircraft. Here's a
        > thought that's been running through my mind for many years.
        >
        > There are a growing number of small industrial diesels, heavier than
        > an equivalent Honda or B&S V-twin, but providing the benefits of
        > diesel - low fuel consumption, the impossibility of an ignition
        > failure, etc.
        >
        > Check out one example, the Yanmar 2V78V. It's a v-twin, liquid-
        > cooled, and puts out 16.1 to 20.1 hp at 2,800 to 3,600 rpm. Best of
        > all, if I read the specs right, it weighs 125.6 pounds with a
        > standard radiator. There is one drawback. It's available as a
        > vertical shaft engine,
        >
        > A diesel-powered craft in a long-winged craft could be a great
        > mileage maker. The Dieselis gets 70 mpg at 99 mph with two on
        > board. Think of a single-seater that could fly on 1/2 gph or less.
        > The Yanmar has a specific fuel consumption of .192 pounds per
        > hp/hour, making full-power consumption about .54 gph of diesel.
        > With most of the bigger gas v-twins burning about 2 gph, this may
        > become significant. Better yet, you could buy biodiesel and be free
        > of middle-eastern oil.
        >
        > Dean Sigler
        >
        > ### Lets use this list to build a knowledge base for those who are
        > interested in flying with these engines. Don't forget you can search the
        > messages archive for past discussions. Please keep comments on subject.
        > Sorry, no attachments allowed.
        >
        > For access to the home page:
        > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Small4-strokeEngines/<
        >
        > For direct access to the files area:
        > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Small4-strokeEngines/files/<
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • deansigler1
        I will look up some details on that unit and post it here. The Smart Car is a three-banger that puts out 41 hp in original trim (699 cc). I think there s a
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2005
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          I will look up some details on that unit and post it here. The
          Smart Car is a three-banger that puts out 41 hp in original trim
          (699 cc). I think there's a 799-cc unit that puts out 50. The unit
          on the trike would burn about 3/4-gallon per hour, making it highly
          patriotic to use. (Insert a smiley of choice here.)

          Dean

          --- In Small4-strokeEngines@yahoogroups.com, Scott Perkins
          <2scott@b...> wrote:
          > There was a mercedes diesel engine powering a small Trike
          > at SunFun
          >
          > It was taken from a vehicle called the "Smart" Car.
          > Scott
          >
          > deansigler1 wrote:
          > >
          > > I love the concept of using the little industrial engines this
          group
          > > advocates for small, potentially practical aircraft. Here's a
          > > thought that's been running through my mind for many years.
          > >
          > > There are a growing number of small industrial diesels, heavier
          than
          > > an equivalent Honda or B&S V-twin, but providing the benefits of
          > > diesel - low fuel consumption, the impossibility of an ignition
          > > failure, etc.
          > >
          > > Check out one example, the Yanmar 2V78V. It's a v-twin, liquid-
          > > cooled, and puts out 16.1 to 20.1 hp at 2,800 to 3,600 rpm.
          Best of
          > > all, if I read the specs right, it weighs 125.6 pounds with a
          > > standard radiator. There is one drawback. It's available as a
          > > vertical shaft engine,
          > >
          > > A diesel-powered craft in a long-winged craft could be a great
          > > mileage maker. The Dieselis gets 70 mpg at 99 mph with two on
          > > board. Think of a single-seater that could fly on 1/2 gph or
          less.
          > > The Yanmar has a specific fuel consumption of .192 pounds per
          > > hp/hour, making full-power consumption about .54 gph of diesel.
          > > With most of the bigger gas v-twins burning about 2 gph, this may
          > > become significant. Better yet, you could buy biodiesel and be
          free
          > > of middle-eastern oil.
          > >
          > > Dean Sigler
          > >
          > > ### Lets use this list to build a knowledge base for those who
          are
          > > interested in flying with these engines. Don't forget you can
          search the
          > > messages archive for past discussions. Please keep comments on
          subject.
          > > Sorry, no attachments allowed.
          > >
          > > For access to the home page:
          > > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Small4-strokeEngines/<
          > >
          > > For direct access to the files area:
          > > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Small4-strokeEngines/files/<
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
        • adrianteal
          It s better than that. From 699cc, the petrol car engine produces 50bhp, 61bhp or 74bhp according to the model spec. It uses an exhaust-gas turbocharger with a
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 2, 2005
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            It's better than that.
            From 699cc, the petrol car engine produces 50bhp, 61bhp or 74bhp
            according to the model spec.
            It uses an exhaust-gas turbocharger with a fully sorted engine-
            mapping computer.

            Only problem is, there is no second-hand engine market. You won't
            find any in scrap-yards, unless you are very lucky.
            Spares are very difficult to source, Daimler-Chrysler are very market
            conscious. If the engine needs replacing under warranty, they ship
            the complete faulty engine back to Germany.

            Crash-damaged write-offs are like hens teeth, and the diesel engine
            is only available in mainland Europe.
            Only the petrol fuel-injection version is on sale in the UK (see
            www.smart.com/uk ). They say it is because the diesel wouldn't meet
            exhaust emission standards. I find that very difficult to believe...

            There is a german website for the aero-engine conversion: if
            anybody's interested, I'll try and find it...

            Adrian
          • deansigler1
            Please hook us up with a link. I know that the folks at Ecofly have a fully-built Smart Car conversion, but it s over 10,000 Euros, or $12,000. That s a bit
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 2, 2005
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              Please hook us up with a link. I know that the folks at Ecofly have
              a fully-built Smart Car conversion, but it's over 10,000 Euros, or
              $12,000. That's a bit beyond the low-budget interests in this
              group. The Dieselis used a used Opel turbo Diesel that the builders
              claim cost under $3,000 since they machined their own reduction
              gear. Even with the used engine, they've done well over 600 hours
              with no problems. There are any number of similar, 200-pound, 60-
              100 hp Euro turbo diesels that would be available in wrecking yards.

              Dean

              --- In Small4-strokeEngines@yahoogroups.com, "adrianteal" <atp@c...>
              wrote:
              > It's better than that.
              > From 699cc, the petrol car engine produces 50bhp, 61bhp or 74bhp
              > according to the model spec.
              > It uses an exhaust-gas turbocharger with a fully sorted engine-
              > mapping computer.
              >
              > Only problem is, there is no second-hand engine market. You won't
              > find any in scrap-yards, unless you are very lucky.
              > Spares are very difficult to source, Daimler-Chrysler are very
              market
              > conscious. If the engine needs replacing under warranty, they ship
              > the complete faulty engine back to Germany.
              >
              > Crash-damaged write-offs are like hens teeth, and the diesel
              engine
              > is only available in mainland Europe.
              > Only the petrol fuel-injection version is on sale in the UK (see
              > www.smart.com/uk ). They say it is because the diesel wouldn't
              meet
              > exhaust emission standards. I find that very difficult to
              believe...
              >
              > There is a german website for the aero-engine conversion: if
              > anybody's interested, I'll try and find it...
              >
              > Adrian
            • adrianteal
              Dean, My link is the same people: www.ecofly.de/english.htm But as you say, it isn t cheap and it isn t light. It s really aimed at GA as a replacement for
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 3, 2005
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                Dean,
                My link is the same people: www.ecofly.de/english.htm
                But as you say, it isn't cheap and it isn't light. It's really aimed
                at GA as a replacement for Lycoming etc.
                The other interesting one is Wilksch Airmotive at www.wilksch.com
                but, again, there's a weight problem.

                Adrian.
                ===========================================
                --- In Small4-strokeEngines@yahoogroups.com, "deansigler1"
                <deansigler1@y...> wrote:
                > Please hook us up with a link. I know that the folks at Ecofly
                have
                > a fully-built Smart Car conversion, but it's over 10,000 Euros, or
                > $12,000. That's a bit beyond the low-budget interests in this
                > group. The Dieselis used a used Opel turbo Diesel that the
                builders
                > claim cost under $3,000 since they machined their own reduction
                > gear. Even with the used engine, they've done well over 600 hours
                > with no problems. There are any number of similar, 200-pound, 60-
                > 100 hp Euro turbo diesels that would be available in wrecking yards.
                >
                > Dean
                >
                > --- In Small4-strokeEngines@yahoogroups.com, "adrianteal"
                <atp@c...>
                > wrote:
                > > It's better than that.
                > > From 699cc, the petrol car engine produces 50bhp, 61bhp or 74bhp
                > > according to the model spec.
                > > It uses an exhaust-gas turbocharger with a fully sorted engine-
                > > mapping computer.
                > >
                > > Only problem is, there is no second-hand engine market. You won't
                > > find any in scrap-yards, unless you are very lucky.
                > > Spares are very difficult to source, Daimler-Chrysler are very
                > market
                > > conscious. If the engine needs replacing under warranty, they
                ship
                > > the complete faulty engine back to Germany.
                > >
                > > Crash-damaged write-offs are like hens teeth, and the diesel
                > engine
                > > is only available in mainland Europe.
                > > Only the petrol fuel-injection version is on sale in the UK (see
                > > www.smart.com/uk ). They say it is because the diesel wouldn't
                > meet
                > > exhaust emission standards. I find that very difficult to
                > believe...
                > >
                > > There is a german website for the aero-engine conversion: if
                > > anybody's interested, I'll try and find it...
                > >
                > > Adrian
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