Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Slovak proverbs

Expand Messages
  • Helen Fedor
    I thought that I might start a new round of conversation starters. We have a book in our reference collection called Nehadzte perly sviniam (Don t Cast
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 20, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      I thought that I might start a new round of conversation starters. We
      have a book in our reference collection called "Nehadzte perly sviniam"
      (Don't Cast Pearls Before Swine) by Blahoslav Hecko. I thought that we
      could have a proverb- or saying-a-day.

      Here's something from the Introduction:

      Pre Arabov su prislovia Kvetom jazyka
      Pre Nemcov Drahocennym zakladom jazyka
      Pre S~panielov Dus~evnym zdravim
      Pre Rusov Zlatym zrnom a zakladom l'udovej mudrosti
      Pre Slovakov Z porekadiel mudrost' vlaje
      (Svetozar Huban Vajansky)

      For Arabs proverbs are the Flowers of the language
      For Germans they are the Precious foundation of the language
      For Spaniards they are Spiritual health
      For Russians the are the Golden Kernel and foundation of folk wisdom
      For Slovaks, Wisdom flows from proverbs.



      Here's the first one:

      "Aj mus~ka sa vie nahnevat'"

      Even a fly has its spleen [translated by the author]
      (Even a fly can get angry.)

      Helen
    • Helen Fedor
      I ll try to send these out on a regular basis again. Rychlo a dobre Fast and good [lit.] Good and quickly seldom meet. Martin?????????????? Sko^r prejde
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 9, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I'll try to send these out on a regular basis again.

        "Rychlo a dobre"
        Fast and good [lit.]
        "Good and quickly seldom meet."

        Martin??????????????


        "Sko^r prejde t'ava uchom ihly, ako bohac~ do Kralovstva nebeskeho"
        It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Heavenly Kingdom.


        H
      • Martin Votruba
        ... All I can do is add question marks, Helen. I don t know in what sense this is supposed to be a saying. AFAIK, it simply means what it says when used as
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 9, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          > "Rychlo a dobre"
          > Fast and good [lit.]
          > "Good and quickly seldom meet."
          >
          > Martin??????????????

          All I can do is add question marks, Helen. I don't know in what sense
          this is supposed to be a saying. AFAIK, it simply means what it says
          when used as part of a sentence, e.g. [Do it] quickly/fast and well.
          [Urob to] rychlo a dobre. (The words are adverbs.)

          Like in English, you could also make it negative, e.g., It can't be
          done both quickly and well. Rychlo a dobre sa to neda., but I don't
          recognize any special meaning in just the three words.


          Martin

          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
        • Helen Fedor
          Maybe they proofread/edited the book too quickly for it to be good. ;-) H ... All I can do is add question marks, Helen. I don t know in what sense this is
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 9, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Maybe they proofread/edited the book too quickly for it to be good. ;-)

            H



            >>> votrubam@... 01/09/06 3:45 PM >>>
            > "Rychlo a dobre"
            > Fast and good [lit.]
            > "Good and quickly seldom meet."
            >
            > Martin??????????????

            All I can do is add question marks, Helen. I don't know in what sense
            this is supposed to be a saying. AFAIK, it simply means what it says
            when used as part of a sentence, e.g. [Do it] quickly/fast and well.
            [Urob to] rychlo a dobre. (The words are adverbs.)

            Like in English, you could also make it negative, e.g., It can't be
            done both quickly and well. Rychlo a dobre sa to neda., but I don't
            recognize any special meaning in just the three words.


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu






            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

            Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • Helen Fedor
            Strach ma vel ke oc~i lit: Fear has big eyes Fear has magnifying eyes EXPLANATION? Strom poznat po ovoci A tree is known by its fruits H
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 30, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              "Strach ma vel'ke oc~i"
              lit: Fear has big eyes
              Fear has magnifying eyes"
              EXPLANATION?


              "Strom poznat' po ovoci"
              A tree is known by its fruits


              H
            • krejc@aol.com
              In a message dated 1/30/06 2:39:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, hfed@loc.gov ... One fear is the fear of the unknown. and when we do not know something we tend
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 30, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 1/30/06 2:39:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, hfed@...
                writes:

                > "Strach ma vel'ke oc~i"
                > lit: Fear has big eyes
                > Fear has magnifying eyes"
                > EXPLANATION?
                >
                >
                >

                One fear is the fear of the unknown. and when we do not know something we
                tend to fill in the blanks, usually with worse than what actually is. could
                this be the meaning of fear has magnifying eyes?


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Helen Fedor
                S usmevom povedat pravdu lit.: telling the truth with a smile Many a true word is spoken in jest. Svet je vs~ade rovnaky The sun shines everywhere H
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 8, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  "S usmevom povedat' pravdu"
                  lit.: "telling the truth with a smile"
                  Many a true word is spoken in jest.


                  "Svet je vs~ade rovnaky"
                  The sun shines everywhere


                  H
                • Helen Fedor
                  Svetom tel a chodilo, ako v^ol sa vratilo lit.: The calf travelled the world and returned as an ox Send a fool to France, and hel ll come back a fool
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 16, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    "Svetom tel'a chodilo, ako v^ol sa vratilo"
                    lit.: The calf travelled the world and returned as an ox
                    "Send a fool to France, and hel'll come back a fool"

                    O.k., Martin, I know that there's more going on here than a calf/ox. Does this play on "v^ol" also meaning a nitwit/dunce? The French (and other versions) translates to "The beast that goes to Rome returns as such [a beast]."



                    "Syty lac~nemu neveri"
                    lit.: The person with a full stomach does not believe [trust?] the hungry person
                    "A well-filled body does not believe in hunger"

                    The Polish version says "The person with a full stomach does not understand the hungry person."


                    H
                  • Helen Fedor
                    Tu je ten pes zakopany lit.: Here s that buried dog. There s the rub. Urob c~ertu dobre, peklom sa ti odsluz~i lit.: Do something nice for the devil and
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 3, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      "Tu je ten pes zakopany"
                      lit.: Here's that buried dog.
                      There's the rub.


                      "Urob c~ertu dobre, peklom sa ti odsluz~i"
                      lit.: Do something nice for the devil and he'll pay you back with hell
                      To warm the serpent in one's bosom
                      ANYONE CARE TO ELABORATE ON THIS ONE?



                      "Urobit' vlka pastierom"
                      lit.: Making the wolf a shepherd
                      To set the wolf to keep the sheep
                      Setting the wolf to guard the henhouse


                      H
                    • Martin Votruba
                      ... The serpent is from a fable by Aesop, but you probably mean the Slovak proverb, Helen? It s quite common. It expresses skepticism about a leopard
                      Message 10 of 13 , Apr 3, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        > "Urob c~ertu dobre, peklom sa ti odsluz~i"
                        > lit.: Do something nice for the devil and
                        > he'll pay you back with hell
                        > To warm the serpent in one's bosom
                        > ANYONE CARE TO ELABORATE ON THIS ONE?

                        The serpent is from a fable by Aesop, but you probably mean the Slovak
                        proverb, Helen? It's quite common. It expresses skepticism about "a
                        leopard shedding its spots." Don't hope to change a bad person by
                        being nice to him/her, he won't be grateful and will treat you the
                        only way he knows how.


                        Martin

                        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                      • Helen Fedor
                        To quote an old Slovak-American saying (here I quote an uncle of the hockey-playing S~t astny brothers): Ahh! To je c~o je tento vacumere! [translation:
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 3, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          To quote an old Slovak-American saying (here I quote an uncle of the hockey-playing S~t'astny brothers):

                          "Ahh! To je c~o je tento vacumere!"

                          [translation: "Ahh! That's what that what's-the-matter is!]
                          It's all in the pronunciation (the "r" is a cross between an "r" and a "t") and intonation...honest.

                          H




                          >>> votrubam@... 04/03/06 3:37 PM >>>
                          > "Urob c~ertu dobre, peklom sa ti odsluz~i"
                          > lit.: Do something nice for the devil and
                          > he'll pay you back with hell
                          > To warm the serpent in one's bosom
                          > ANYONE CARE TO ELABORATE ON THIS ONE?

                          The serpent is from a fable by Aesop, but you probably mean the Slovak
                          proverb, Helen? It's quite common. It expresses skepticism about "a
                          leopard shedding its spots." Don't hope to change a bad person by
                          being nice to him/her, he won't be grateful and will treat you the
                          only way he knows how.


                          Martin

                          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu






                          SPONSORED LINKS
                          Slovakia phone card Slovakia call Bratislava slovakia Hotel slovakia Slovakia phone Slovakia
                          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

                          Visit your group "Slovak-World" on the web.
                          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                        • Nick Holcz
                          ... My mother told me if you sup with the devil use a long spoon Nick
                          Message 12 of 13 , Apr 4, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            At 03:37 AM 4/04/2006, you wrote:
                            > > "Urob c~ertu dobre, peklom sa ti odsluz~i"
                            > > lit.: Do something nice for the devil and
                            > > he'll pay you back with hell
                            > > To warm the serpent in one's bosom
                            > > ANYONE CARE TO ELABORATE ON THIS ONE?


                            My mother told me " if you sup with the devil use a long spoon"

                            Nick
                          • Helen Fedor
                            Viac oc~i viac vidi lit.: the more eyes, the more that is seen Two (four) eyes see more than one (two) Vino do hlavy, rozum von z hlavy lit.: Wine into
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 12, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              "Viac oc~i viac vidi"
                              lit.: the more eyes, the more that is seen
                              Two (four) eyes see more than one (two)


                              "Vino do hlavy, rozum von z hlavy"
                              lit.: Wine into the head, reason out of the head
                              When the wine is in, the wit is out


                              "Vino rozvesel'uje srdce c~loveka"
                              Wine makes glad the heart of man


                              H
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.