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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Expatriate status

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  • krejc@aol.com
    CJ, My dream, also. Only I don t want to work. Just live there and enjoy the country and look for relatives to pester. Noreen [Non-text portions of this
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 2, 2004
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      CJ,
      My dream, also. Only I don't want to work. Just live there and enjoy the
      country and look for relatives to pester.
      Noreen


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Votruba
      ... Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation brotherly sausage elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies glory, or Slavdom, not
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 2, 2004
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        > The Poles and the Czechs in particular have a great fear of the
        > 'almighty Deutschmark'. It may be the almighty Euro today, but these
        > two countries along with Slovakia have reason to fear rich westerners
        > coming in and buying up the land.

        Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation
        "brotherly sausage" elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies "glory," or
        "Slavdom," not "beauty"). Some old EU members have such laws, too: e.g,
        the Germans have not been allowed to buy summer cottages in Denmark.

        Slovakia is going to follow two tracks. Foreigners will be able to buy
        real estate beginning May 1, 2004 -- but not agricultural land (including
        forests). The citizens of the EU countries will be able to buy
        agricultural land in Slovakia beginning May 1, 2007, provided that they
        will have managed the land for three years, and will have had temporary
        residence in Slovakia.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      • amiak27
        Thanks for the commentary, Martin. My typing is almost as bad as my languages skills, but it leads to some fun now and then. Yes, I do occasionally use a
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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          Thanks for the commentary, Martin. My typing is almost as bad as my
          languages skills, but it leads to some fun now and then. Yes, I do
          occasionally use a spell checker, but I access these forums through
          the internet and I have to cut and paste to spell check and correct
          for fumble fingers.

          Darn, the 'beauty' and 'glory' switcheroo for "Bratislava" was not
          the best! It took me some time to realize 'Sobota' and 'Svoboda' are
          different, even if Saturday most often means freedom. Perhaps I am
          repeating myself, but I have often pointed out similarities in German
          and Slovak. On the other side of the coin, there is 'jedes'
          for 'every' and Slovak 'jedno' for 'one'. No wonder they had trouble
          understanding one another... at least there is fun with the languages.

          Now when in Germany I knew a fellow from what sounded like
          the "Hunsrueck", which I took to be "Chicken Back" mountains west of
          Frankfurt, perhaps comparable to the Razorbacks in Arkansas. It
          turned out they only sounded much alike, it was not named after
          chickens.

          Getting serious, I am happy to see some of the uniformity coming in
          with the EU. On the positive side I see equal rights for people
          throughout the Community, and thus uniform majority and minority
          rights, hopefully ending a lot of the quibbling about minorities and
          accusations of discrimination. We will know West Europe is serious
          about minority expression and autonomist rule when they grant such
          rights to the Basques in France and Spain.... that will be a good
          example for Slovakia and Hungary.
        • capt jack
          Noreen, Yes I agree, would be nice to just be there and pester relatives as you said, but it also would be wonderful to contribute something to the new
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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            Noreen,

            Yes I agree, would be nice to just be there and pester relatives as you said, but it also would be wonderful to contribute something to the new Slovakia as it moves ahead.

            CJ


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • J. Michutka
            ... Weren t there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split, who were no
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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              >
              >
              >Slovakia is going to follow two tracks. Foreigners will be able to buy
              >real estate beginning May 1, 2004 -- but not agricultural land (including
              >forests). The citizens of the EU countries will be able to buy
              >agricultural land in Slovakia beginning May 1, 2007, provided that they
              >will have managed the land for three years, and will have had temporary
              >residence in Slovakia.

              Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
              ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split, who
              were no longer allowed to own land/cottages there because they weren't
              Slovaks? It sounds like the upcoming changes will reverse that--more hard
              feelings among those who had to give up/sell their cottages so recently?

              Julie Michutka
              jmm@...
            • yawho2001
              ... these ... westerners ... Martin, when I was taking a Russian course several years ago, the instructor/translator (born in Russia) stated that Bratislava
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...>
                wrote:
                > > The Poles and the Czechs in particular have a great fear of the
                > > 'almighty Deutschmark'. It may be the almighty Euro today, but
                these
                > > two countries along with Slovakia have reason to fear rich
                westerners
                > > coming in and buying up the land.
                >
                > Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation
                > "brotherly sausage" elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies "glory," or
                > "Slavdom," not "beauty").

                Martin, when I was taking a Russian course several years ago, the
                instructor/translator (born in Russia) stated that Bratislava
                translated to "Gateway to the Slavs". I mentioned that a few years
                ago on this list and someone stated that it was not correct. As I
                recall he said " BPRATA'(Russian) " pronounced "vrata" translates as
                gate and as you said "slava" can mean glory or Slavdom. I did find a
                Slovak definition for gate that was spelled "vra'ta". Do you know
                the origin of the name Bratislava?

                Janko
              • Martin Votruba
                ... The split didn t affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that s what the problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to the
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                  > Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
                  > ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split,
                  > who were no longer allowed to own land/cottages

                  The split didn't affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that's what the
                  problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to
                  the nearest official border crossing and then on obscure unpaved forest
                  roads to get to them from the east, while their cottages (and a company's
                  holiday residence), just across the border in Slovakia, used to be
                  accessible easily on a dead-end asphalt road from the Moravian side.

                  No one lost property during the split no matter what and where in the
                  other new country it was (just the "nationalized" companies were divided
                  between Bratislava and Prague).

                  The complaints still persist. Bratislava and Prague are planning to relax
                  the limits on where the Slovak and Czech citizens are allowed to cross
                  their mutual border after they join the EU.


                  Martin

                  votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                • J. Michutka
                  ... Hmmm, guess I had mis-understood it all. Thanks for the explanation! Julie
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                    At 04:52 PM 2/3/04 -0500, you wrote:
                    > > Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
                    > > ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split,
                    > > who were no longer allowed to own land/cottages
                    >
                    >The split didn't affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that's what the
                    >problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to
                    >the nearest official border crossing


                    Hmmm, guess I had mis-understood it all. Thanks for the explanation!

                    Julie
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