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Expatriate status

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  • krejc@aol.com
    Dear List, after 8 long months of waiting for a decision on my application for the Expatriate card, I have on Friday by certified mail received a package in
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 31, 2004
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      Dear List,
      after 8 long months of waiting for a decision on my application for the
      Expatriate card, I have on Friday by certified mail received a package in the mail
      from the Slovak Embassy in Washington.
      The two letters are very long and are written in Slovak language which i will
      get translated. But can someone please tell me what this means.

      Rozhodnutie:
      ....."Konanie sa prerusuje. Ucastnicke konania sa uklada odstranit
      nedostatky v jej ziadosti do 30 dni odo dna dorucenia tohto rozhodnutia...."

      I believe that this is the decision and that something is necessary within
      30 days. Since the letter is dated November 11 2003, I realize that 30 days
      are over. However, I just received it. Whatever it says, I am sure that the
      decision is not favorable and that I must probably start all over.

      Thank you in advance if someone can tell me what that decision is all about.
      Noreen



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Martin Votruba
      ... They re saying that the legal action has been suspended, pending your correction of [the] shortcomings in your application within 30 days from the
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 31, 2004
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        > "Konanie sa prerusuje. Ucastnicke konania sa uklada odstranit
        > nedostatky v jej ziadosti do 30 dni odo dna dorucenia tohto
        > rozhodnutia...."

        They're saying that the legal action has been suspended, pending your
        correction of [the] "shortcomings" in your application within 30 days from
        the receipt of this letter.

        But, Noreen, the European Union has said that Slovakia's Law on Expatriate
        Status is at odds with the EU laws. Slovakia will join the EU on May 1,
        2004. A Slovak Deputy Prime Minister said a week ago that an amended law
        will probably go to the Parliament in March. Another option being
        considered is to abolish it entirely.


        Martin

        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      • capt jack
        Martin, When Slovakia joins the EU, will it be possible for citizens of the U.S. to obtain employment in Slovakia without an expatriate card, and buy land or a
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 1, 2004
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          Martin,

          When Slovakia joins the EU, will it be possible for citizens of the U.S. to obtain employment in Slovakia without an expatriate card, and buy land or a home there?

          CJ


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Martin Votruba
          ... In principle, Slovakia s policy will be similar to the rest of the EU. It s already about as difficult/easy for an American to work in Slovakia as it is
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 1, 2004
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            > When Slovakia joins the EU, will it be possible for citizens of the U.S.

            In principle, Slovakia's policy will be similar to the rest of the EU.

            It's already about as difficult/easy for an American to work in Slovakia
            as it is now to work in Germany, Sweden... But except for the visa
            policy, which is already synchronized with the EU, there'll be a
            transition period that'll affect land and real estate ownership policy in
            particular. Moreover, each EU member has quite some leeway in the details
            of how it handles consular and ownership issues of citizens of non-member
            countries. Slovakia, and the other new EU members, is worried about
            foreigners buying up land and real estate, still quite cheap for Western
            Europeans and Americans.


            As to the visitor visa policy: U.S. citizens can now visit Slovakia for up
            to 3 months without a visa in any 6-month period. That is an extension
            upon the earlier one-month limit.

            But the new thing is that the 3-months include not just a stay in
            Slovakia, but, cumulatively, in any EU member country. In other words, a
            U.S. citizen can visit "the European Union" without a visa for a total of
            up to 3 months within any 6-month period. It can be a continuous EU
            visit, or multiple shorter visits to the EU.

            That is to say, that -- for example -- if someone has traveled within the
            EU without a visa for 3 months continuously, s/he has to leave it for 3
            months in order to be able to come back without a visa again.

            Although this spells trouble for those non-EU citizens who didn't bother
            to get a visa for extended stays in Slovakia, and just "reset" the
            one-month visa-free limit each month by visiting a neighboring country for
            a day and coming back, the current EU regulation is more convenient for
            the overwhelming majority of casual visitors who don't stay for more than
            3 months at a stretch in Slovakia, or in the rest of the EU.


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • Dr. Joe Q
            Thank you for the details. Perhaps the realignment of the laws will include permission for people who are not Slovak citizens to buy property in Slovakia? Dr.
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 1, 2004
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              Thank you for the details.

              Perhaps the realignment of the laws will include
              permission for people who are not Slovak citizens to
              buy property in Slovakia?

              Dr. "Q"


              --- Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:
              > > When Slovakia joins the EU, will it be possible
              > for citizens of the U.S.
              >
              > In principle, Slovakia's policy will be similar to
              > the rest of the EU.
              >
              > It's already about as difficult/easy for an American
              > to work in Slovakia
              > as it is now to work in Germany, Sweden... But
              > except for the visa
              > policy, which is already synchronized with the EU,
              > there'll be a
              > transition period that'll affect land and real
              > estate ownership policy in
              > particular. Moreover, each EU member has quite some
              > leeway in the details
              > of how it handles consular and ownership issues of
              > citizens of non-member
              > countries. Slovakia, and the other new EU members,
              > is worried about
              > foreigners buying up land and real estate, still
              > quite cheap for Western
              > Europeans and Americans.
              >
              >
              > As to the visitor visa policy: U.S. citizens can now
              > visit Slovakia for up
              > to 3 months without a visa in any 6-month period.
              > That is an extension
              > upon the earlier one-month limit.
              >
              > But the new thing is that the 3-months include not
              > just a stay in
              > Slovakia, but, cumulatively, in any EU member
              > country. In other words, a
              > U.S. citizen can visit "the European Union" without
              > a visa for a total of
              > up to 3 months within any 6-month period. It can be
              > a continuous EU
              > visit, or multiple shorter visits to the EU.
              >
              > That is to say, that -- for example -- if someone
              > has traveled within the
              > EU without a visa for 3 months continuously, s/he
              > has to leave it for 3
              > months in order to be able to come back without a
              > visa again.
              >
              > Although this spells trouble for those non-EU
              > citizens who didn't bother
              > to get a visa for extended stays in Slovakia, and
              > just "reset" the
              > one-month visa-free limit each month by visiting a
              > neighboring country for
              > a day and coming back, the current EU regulation is
              > more convenient for
              > the overwhelming majority of casual visitors who
              > don't stay for more than
              > 3 months at a stretch in Slovakia, or in the rest of
              > the EU.
              >
              >
              > Martin
              >
              > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
              >
              >

              __________________________________
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            • capt jack
              Thanks for the clarification Martin. CJ [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 1, 2004
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                Thanks for the clarification Martin.

                CJ


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • amiak27
                Doc, We may expect the Slovaks to proceed slowly and carefully in allowing foreigners to buy land and property. The Poles and the Czechs in particular have a
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 1, 2004
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                  Doc,

                  We may expect the Slovaks to proceed slowly and carefully in allowing
                  foreigners to buy land and property. The Poles and the Czechs in
                  particular have a great fear of the 'almighty Deutschmark'. It may
                  be the almighty Euro today, but these two countries along with
                  Slovakia have reason to fear rich westerners coming in and buying up
                  the land. This ties in with the German settlers being kicked out
                  after the war, the continued vague claims these people put forth and
                  the problems they tried to pose, for example, to Czech entry into the
                  EU. I believe the Poles negotiated a seven year delay in free sale
                  of property, and I am not what the Czechs and Slovaks intend.

                  Part of the reasons for so much fallow land in these post-communist
                  countries is that some land remains in disputed ownership, and where
                  land has been returned to private holders, many do not have the
                  necessary capital to buy the machinery or fix up the buildings to
                  operate the farm properly. Currently it appears a very substantial
                  part of Czech farmland is leased to Germans who do have the necessary
                  capital. I can only suspect that the Slovaks fear the same
                  situation, and in the name of 'equality', Slovak-Americans must be
                  treated as any other foreigner. Of course, if they grant us special
                  status, then they cannot object if the Hungarians grant Slovak-
                  Hungarians special status.

                  A fine bowl of ethnic spaghetti and politics!

                  Ron

                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Dr. Joe Q" <doctor_jq@y...>
                  wrote:
                  > Thank you for the details.
                  >
                  > Perhaps the realignment of the laws will include
                  > permission for people who are not Slovak citizens to
                  > buy property in Slovakia?
                  >
                  > Dr. "Q"
                  >
                  >
                  > --- Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...> wrote:
                  > > > When Slovakia joins the EU, will it be possible
                  > > for citizens of the U.S.
                  > >
                  > > In principle, Slovakia's policy will be similar to
                  > > the rest of the EU.
                  > >
                  > > It's already about as difficult/easy for an American
                  > > to work in Slovakia
                  > > as it is now to work in Germany, Sweden... But
                  > > except for the visa
                  > > policy, which is already synchronized with the EU,
                  > > there'll be a
                  > > transition period that'll affect land and real
                  > > estate ownership policy in
                  > > particular. Moreover, each EU member has quite some
                  > > leeway in the details
                  > > of how it handles consular and ownership issues of
                  > > citizens of non-member
                  > > countries. Slovakia, and the other new EU members,
                  > > is worried about
                  > > foreigners buying up land and real estate, still
                  > > quite cheap for Western
                  > > Europeans and Americans.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > As to the visitor visa policy: U.S. citizens can now
                  > > visit Slovakia for up
                  > > to 3 months without a visa in any 6-month period.
                  > > That is an extension
                  > > upon the earlier one-month limit.
                  > >
                  > > But the new thing is that the 3-months include not
                  > > just a stay in
                  > > Slovakia, but, cumulatively, in any EU member
                  > > country. In other words, a
                  > > U.S. citizen can visit "the European Union" without
                  > > a visa for a total of
                  > > up to 3 months within any 6-month period. It can be
                  > > a continuous EU
                  > > visit, or multiple shorter visits to the EU.
                  > >
                  > > That is to say, that -- for example -- if someone
                  > > has traveled within the
                  > > EU without a visa for 3 months continuously, s/he
                  > > has to leave it for 3
                  > > months in order to be able to come back without a
                  > > visa again.
                  > >
                  > > Although this spells trouble for those non-EU
                  > > citizens who didn't bother
                  > > to get a visa for extended stays in Slovakia, and
                  > > just "reset" the
                  > > one-month visa-free limit each month by visiting a
                  > > neighboring country for
                  > > a day and coming back, the current EU regulation is
                  > > more convenient for
                  > > the overwhelming majority of casual visitors who
                  > > don't stay for more than
                  > > 3 months at a stretch in Slovakia, or in the rest of
                  > > the EU.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Martin
                  > >
                  > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > __________________________________
                  > Do you Yahoo!?
                  > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!
                  > http://webhosting.yahoo.com/ps/sb/
                • capt jack
                  I just learned that one of my cousins, is an owner of an airlines in Slovakia. Isnt the new slovakia wonderful! Many of my family over there are becoming
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 2, 2004
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                    I just learned that one of my cousins, is an owner of an airlines in Slovakia. Isnt the new slovakia wonderful! Many of my family over there are becoming business owners.


                    SkyEurope is the first low-cost airline in Central Europe. With bases in Hungary and the Slovak Republic, it is also the first multi-based airline in the region. As a low-cost air-carrier from a low-cost country, SkyEurope is well-equipped for competition in an enlarged European market.

                    SkyEurope offers daily low-fare connections from London to Budapest and Bratislava from �17. It operates a route network of 14 destinations including Paris, Milan, Venice, Berlin, Stuttgart, Zurich, Prague, Split, Zadar, Dubrovnik and Ko�ice.

                    It is because of this, that I am curious if I would be permitted to work over there, and buy a home while I do. This was the intent of my original question about working in Slovakia and also having a home there.



                    CJ



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • krejc@aol.com
                    CJ, My dream, also. Only I don t want to work. Just live there and enjoy the country and look for relatives to pester. Noreen [Non-text portions of this
                    Message 9 of 16 , Feb 2, 2004
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                      CJ,
                      My dream, also. Only I don't want to work. Just live there and enjoy the
                      country and look for relatives to pester.
                      Noreen


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Martin Votruba
                      ... Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation brotherly sausage elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies glory, or Slavdom, not
                      Message 10 of 16 , Feb 2, 2004
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                        > The Poles and the Czechs in particular have a great fear of the
                        > 'almighty Deutschmark'. It may be the almighty Euro today, but these
                        > two countries along with Slovakia have reason to fear rich westerners
                        > coming in and buying up the land.

                        Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation
                        "brotherly sausage" elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies "glory," or
                        "Slavdom," not "beauty"). Some old EU members have such laws, too: e.g,
                        the Germans have not been allowed to buy summer cottages in Denmark.

                        Slovakia is going to follow two tracks. Foreigners will be able to buy
                        real estate beginning May 1, 2004 -- but not agricultural land (including
                        forests). The citizens of the EU countries will be able to buy
                        agricultural land in Slovakia beginning May 1, 2007, provided that they
                        will have managed the land for three years, and will have had temporary
                        residence in Slovakia.


                        Martin

                        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                      • amiak27
                        Thanks for the commentary, Martin. My typing is almost as bad as my languages skills, but it leads to some fun now and then. Yes, I do occasionally use a
                        Message 11 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                          Thanks for the commentary, Martin. My typing is almost as bad as my
                          languages skills, but it leads to some fun now and then. Yes, I do
                          occasionally use a spell checker, but I access these forums through
                          the internet and I have to cut and paste to spell check and correct
                          for fumble fingers.

                          Darn, the 'beauty' and 'glory' switcheroo for "Bratislava" was not
                          the best! It took me some time to realize 'Sobota' and 'Svoboda' are
                          different, even if Saturday most often means freedom. Perhaps I am
                          repeating myself, but I have often pointed out similarities in German
                          and Slovak. On the other side of the coin, there is 'jedes'
                          for 'every' and Slovak 'jedno' for 'one'. No wonder they had trouble
                          understanding one another... at least there is fun with the languages.

                          Now when in Germany I knew a fellow from what sounded like
                          the "Hunsrueck", which I took to be "Chicken Back" mountains west of
                          Frankfurt, perhaps comparable to the Razorbacks in Arkansas. It
                          turned out they only sounded much alike, it was not named after
                          chickens.

                          Getting serious, I am happy to see some of the uniformity coming in
                          with the EU. On the positive side I see equal rights for people
                          throughout the Community, and thus uniform majority and minority
                          rights, hopefully ending a lot of the quibbling about minorities and
                          accusations of discrimination. We will know West Europe is serious
                          about minority expression and autonomist rule when they grant such
                          rights to the Basques in France and Spain.... that will be a good
                          example for Slovakia and Hungary.
                        • capt jack
                          Noreen, Yes I agree, would be nice to just be there and pester relatives as you said, but it also would be wonderful to contribute something to the new
                          Message 12 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                            Noreen,

                            Yes I agree, would be nice to just be there and pester relatives as you said, but it also would be wonderful to contribute something to the new Slovakia as it moves ahead.

                            CJ


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • J. Michutka
                            ... Weren t there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split, who were no
                            Message 13 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                              >
                              >
                              >Slovakia is going to follow two tracks. Foreigners will be able to buy
                              >real estate beginning May 1, 2004 -- but not agricultural land (including
                              >forests). The citizens of the EU countries will be able to buy
                              >agricultural land in Slovakia beginning May 1, 2007, provided that they
                              >will have managed the land for three years, and will have had temporary
                              >residence in Slovakia.

                              Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
                              ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split, who
                              were no longer allowed to own land/cottages there because they weren't
                              Slovaks? It sounds like the upcoming changes will reverse that--more hard
                              feelings among those who had to give up/sell their cottages so recently?

                              Julie Michutka
                              jmm@...
                            • yawho2001
                              ... these ... westerners ... Martin, when I was taking a Russian course several years ago, the instructor/translator (born in Russia) stated that Bratislava
                              Message 14 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Martin Votruba <votrubam@y...>
                                wrote:
                                > > The Poles and the Czechs in particular have a great fear of the
                                > > 'almighty Deutschmark'. It may be the almighty Euro today, but
                                these
                                > > two countries along with Slovakia have reason to fear rich
                                westerners
                                > > coming in and buying up the land.
                                >
                                > Thanks, Ron, for the overview (and for suggesting the translation
                                > "brotherly sausage" elsewhere! -- BTW, -slava implies "glory," or
                                > "Slavdom," not "beauty").

                                Martin, when I was taking a Russian course several years ago, the
                                instructor/translator (born in Russia) stated that Bratislava
                                translated to "Gateway to the Slavs". I mentioned that a few years
                                ago on this list and someone stated that it was not correct. As I
                                recall he said " BPRATA'(Russian) " pronounced "vrata" translates as
                                gate and as you said "slava" can mean glory or Slavdom. I did find a
                                Slovak definition for gate that was spelled "vra'ta". Do you know
                                the origin of the name Bratislava?

                                Janko
                              • Martin Votruba
                                ... The split didn t affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that s what the problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to the
                                Message 15 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                                  > Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
                                  > ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split,
                                  > who were no longer allowed to own land/cottages

                                  The split didn't affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that's what the
                                  problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to
                                  the nearest official border crossing and then on obscure unpaved forest
                                  roads to get to them from the east, while their cottages (and a company's
                                  holiday residence), just across the border in Slovakia, used to be
                                  accessible easily on a dead-end asphalt road from the Moravian side.

                                  No one lost property during the split no matter what and where in the
                                  other new country it was (just the "nationalized" companies were divided
                                  between Bratislava and Prague).

                                  The complaints still persist. Bratislava and Prague are planning to relax
                                  the limits on where the Slovak and Czech citizens are allowed to cross
                                  their mutual border after they join the EU.


                                  Martin

                                  votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                • J. Michutka
                                  ... Hmmm, guess I had mis-understood it all. Thanks for the explanation! Julie
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Feb 3, 2004
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                                    At 04:52 PM 2/3/04 -0500, you wrote:
                                    > > Weren't there some issues and hard feelings among Czechs whose cottages
                                    > > ended up just over the border in the Slovak Republic, after the split,
                                    > > who were no longer allowed to own land/cottages
                                    >
                                    >The split didn't affect ownership, Julie, just access -- that's what the
                                    >problem was. They were unhappy that they now had to travel all the way to
                                    >the nearest official border crossing


                                    Hmmm, guess I had mis-understood it all. Thanks for the explanation!

                                    Julie
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