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Re: Hospes?

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  • amiak27
    Hi Andrea - Thanks for the good wishes. I hope you all had as a fine a holiday as I enjoyed, and to all my wishes for good health and prosperity in the new
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 29, 2003
      Hi Andrea -

      Thanks for the good wishes. I hope you all had as a fine a holiday
      as I enjoyed, and to all my wishes for good health and prosperity in
      the new year.

      I am going through the book I mentioned bringing back from
      Budapest, "A Cultural History of Hungary from the Beginnings to the
      Eighteenth Century", edited by Laszlo Kosa. ISBN 963-13-4836-9 On
      page 74 he addresses "Hospes" thus:

      "The overwhelming majority of the mediaeval population were village-
      dwellers.
      In the eleventh and twelfth centuries the royal seats of
      Székesfehérvár and Esztergom, the seats of the ispán (comes, or
      stewards) who were the administrative leaders of counties, the
      ecclesiastical sees (archiepiscopal or episcopal) and the residences
      of rich secular estate owners attracted merchants who settled near
      the castles or at other key locations, such as river crossings or the
      borders of regions where different products were made. (One route for
      the transport of luxury articles, mainly spices, led through Hungary
      as early as the eleventh century.) Many immigrant hospes ('guests'),
      mainly of German and neo-Latin origin, who settled in Hungary from
      the twelfth century onwards, were craftsmen. Like the farmers, they
      settled in return for certain privileges or some sort of protection.
      Out of such hospes privileges grew the statutory rights enjoyed by
      the market-towns and towns. Since life in a privileged settlement was
      attractive, the number of inhabitants in market-towns and towns grew
      rapidly, and the street patterns become more complex than were those
      of the villages. A market-town (oppidum), according to the thinking
      of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, was not surrounded by
      walls: it "stood free in the fields", in contrast to the walled city
      (civitas). Soon some market-towns, such as Szeged, became towns
      proper; other towns, such as Sárvár, were given away by the king, so
      the distinguishing features between the two types of town became less
      marked, and the legal criteria became more important. The lord of
      a 'free royal town was the monarch, while that of the market-town was
      an ecclesiastical or temporal magnate. Town-dwellers enjoyed more
      privileges than were due to the inhabitants of the market-towns. ..."
      If it does not come out in the message, "ispán" is ispan with a slant
      over the a, similar to "ispa'n", and similarly "Sárvár" is "Sa'va'r"
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