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Re: [Slovak-World] "Veela" in Harry Potter

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  • jarmata@gsphdean.gsph.pitt.edu
    Yes, there s a connection. The East Slavs associate Pentecost or Trinity Sunday with appearances of the rusalki (vily). Apparently that s their busy time of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 27 12:31 PM
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      Yes, there's a connection. The East Slavs associate Pentecost or
      Trinity Sunday with appearances of the rusalki (vily).
      Apparently that's their busy time of year! Probably an old pagan
      spring-time belief that survived into the Christian calendar.

      Joe


      >
      > In our eastern dialect of Slovak, the name for one of the holy days
      > (Pentecost??) is "Rusadl'a". When I first read about rusalky several
      > years ago, I assumed that the two names were related, perhaps a pagan
      > feast taken over by Christianity. Does anyone know anything else about
      > a possible link?
      >
      > Helen
      >
      > >>> jarmata@... 07/21/03 21:47 PM >>>
      > Here's something for you Harry Potter fans out there. In the
      > fifth book there's a delightful depiction of "veela" from
      > Bulgaria. The vila is a supernatural character known to all the
      > Slavs under names such as vila, samovila, or rusalka, so here's
      > some info on the Slovak version.
      >
      > Rowling used "veela" as the singular and plural in her book. In
      > Slovak, the singular is vila, plural is vily.
      >
      > Vily were imagined as young women with long flowing blonde or
      > flaxen hair, usually dressed in white, very beautiful with
      > enchanting voices. They stayed in groups, and were rarely seen
      > alone. They sat in trees near rivers and lakes, and on St.
      > George's day, or on moonlit nights or even at noontide, you could
      > hear their singing and laughter.
      >
      > They weren't necessarily evil towards humans, so long as you left
      > them alone, but if you disturbed them, they would dance you or
      > tickle you to death. If a young man came towards them along the
      > path, they would lure him with their singing, then dance him to
      > death. They would also ambush and capture a young mother if she
      > left her house before being churched (our older listers might
      > remember churching - six weeks after giving birth, a mother would
      > go to church for a blessing, after which she could resume normal
      > activities that were forbidden her during pregnancy and just
      > after giving birth).
      >
      > The defense against vily was wearig your clothing inside out, or
      > hearing a rooster crow.
      >
      > Eastern Slavs use the term rusalka or rusalija for the same
      > figure, and often connect them with the souls of girls who died
      > young, or who drowned or committed suicide. Mint and wormood
      > (chernobyl) were effective protection against them.
      >
      > Joe Armata
      >
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