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Are you an ex communist?

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  • Vladimir Bohinc
    Well, this question just came in from a SW member. I thought, it would be a good idea to answer in open. Yes I was one. When I was 18, the school director made
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 7, 2003
      Well, this question just came in from a SW member. I thought, it would be a good idea to answer in open.
      Yes I was one.
      When I was 18, the school director made me an offer I was not supposed to turn down. Although, this was in Slovenia, the method was russian. Very soon I have seen this from the inside and that made me sick. After a year, I gave back the papers.
      Slovenia,as opposed to Slovakia, which was behind the iron curtain, was more liberal. We were allowed to travel and work abroad and bring money back. Hundreds of thousands of Slovenes did that. My father did it and I did it later. My brother was working in Iran. But, the political organization, the party, the system how they worked, that was more or less the same.
      What influenced my political views was the radio. We had a very good antenna and in the evenings, Radio Paris, London, VOA and Trieste were listened. Radio Trieste even sent us a book to learn italian, which was one of my first books regarding learning foreign languages.
      My family was very catholic. My gf was playing organs in the church.My father had 11 siblings and most of them were singing in the chorus.
      Since then, I never was in any party or mass movement. I prefer to build myself my own opinion.

      It just came to my mind; this is a very good question to check your friend with.
      Regards,
      Vladimir


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • janeg23832
      Vladimir, You were not alone. I have a very close friend who one day said he had something that he wanted to tell me but was afraid because I might never talk
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 7, 2003
        Vladimir,

        You were not alone. I have a very close friend who one day said he
        had something that he wanted to tell me but was afraid because I
        might never talk to him again. To give you some background, I am a
        rtired US Army engineer officer. When he told me I was not shocked
        or outraged as he thought I would be. He had joined,like you said,to
        get along in the system and feed and house his family. I don't judge
        people by their past, more by what they are showing me in the present
        now.

        jimmy


        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Vladimir Bohinc" <konekta@n...>
        wrote:
        > Well, this question just came in from a SW member. I thought, it
        would be a good idea to answer in open.
        > Yes I was one.
        > When I was 18, the school director made me an offer I was not
        supposed to turn down. Although, this was in Slovenia, the method was
        russian. Very soon I have seen this from the inside and that made me
        sick. After a year, I gave back the papers.
        > Slovenia,as opposed to Slovakia, which was behind the iron curtain,
        was more liberal. We were allowed to travel and work abroad and bring
        money back. Hundreds of thousands of Slovenes did that. My father did
        it and I did it later. My brother was working in Iran. But, the
        political organization, the party, the system how they worked, that
        was more or less the same.
        > What influenced my political views was the radio. We had a very
        good antenna and in the evenings, Radio Paris, London, VOA and
        Trieste were listened. Radio Trieste even sent us a book to learn
        italian, which was one of my first books regarding learning foreign
        languages.
        > My family was very catholic. My gf was playing organs in the
        church.My father had 11 siblings and most of them were singing in the
        chorus.
        > Since then, I never was in any party or mass movement. I prefer to
        build myself my own opinion.
        >
        > It just came to my mind; this is a very good question to check your
        friend with.
        > Regards,
        > Vladimir
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • William C. Wormuth
        During the communist rule many, many were paper communists , who were party members , in order to obtain and hold jobs such as teacher or lawyer. I had
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 7, 2003
          During the communist rule many, many were "paper communists", who were party members , in order to obtain and hold jobs such as teacher or lawyer.

          I had relatives who were such and although we all knew we never openly discussed.

          The only time I can remember prejudice against them was if they openly participated in such things as reporting on who was attending mass on Sunday, which often resulted in those people losing their jobs.

          I had a cousin in Velke Kostol'any, who was SNB, (sheriff). When I asked him how he could you do bad things, for political reasons, to his own people, he replied that he didn't want to talk about it.

          After the fall of communism, their was little "revenge" but I do remember that some teachers were asked to leave their schools and the towns.

          There were some who went to work in the oil fields in Iraq, Iran and Libya and I was told they paid a large tax to the government.

          I remember talking to the Farkas~ family musicians, in Vienna, when they played in the Slovakia restaurant and they told me the same, that they were heavily taxed. (They were really nice to me, filled me with food and slivovica and then I sang with them until closing).

          Nothing would have or is gained by animosity toward former communists but it does bother me that the first to send their children here to schools on the exchange programs were the communists, who had the money and that the active politicians following the fall of communism were "former" communists, still dipping into the money pot.

          Most of my family refused to cooperate with them, raised their children, Catholic and attended mass regularly. As a result none were allowed higher education.

          I had my negative experiences with the secret police but luckily nothing drastic. I am only happy that Slovakia is no longer under the yoke and I am confident that our people will "catch up", with the rest of Europe.

          Vlado, I may not agree with all that you say but your contributions have enlightened us all and given us understanding of modern Slovakia. I thank you sincerely.

          Vilo
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