Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Slovak-World] Visiting your relatives in Slovakia

Expand Messages
  • Ron Matviyak
    Hello Vlad! Yes, what you and everyone is saying is true, in broad sweeping terms. It is fine in that context. I just got tired of hearing repeated that all
    Message 1 of 83 , Jun 4, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Vlad!

      Yes, what you and everyone is saying is true, in broad sweeping terms.
      It is fine in that context. I just got tired of hearing repeated that
      all Slovak women are strong and rule the family and fit one mold, and
      that all Slovak men fit another. I wished to state that Slovaks also
      have diversity within their country and within their culture, just as
      other people do. So there are strong and weak, outgoing and shy, drunk
      and greedy in a fine and interesting mixture. One paint brush does not
      paint all.

      I do agree >> It is the liberty of every reader, to use his own filter
      and divide this
      > "all" with whatever he pleases.
      > But, Slovaks have some distinct characteristics, as any other nationalities
      > or ethnic groups too.

      Now that is interesting with shortcuts and crossing railroad tracks. On
      making three lanes of traffic on a two lane road, I fit right in with
      the Slovaks. Others on this list do not like it, I find it quite
      orderly and civilized. I also pass on hills and curves in Slovakia, and
      would never do that in the US. There is a special driving atmosphere in
      Slovakia. I learned of short cuts as a kid when they built a small Nike
      missile base between my house and a friend. We learned how easy it is
      for a kid to jump a 6 foot fence with three strands of barbed wire, and
      how to time the army guards so we would jump the other fence to get out
      in time. So I have little respect for security.

      There was a smart engineer with a new building on a university. They
      built no sidewalks the first year, they just planted grass. The second
      year they built sidewalks where the students made paths.

      Oh, back to stereotypes. The truth is not always the truth. I just had
      German visitors as guests, one was in America for the first time. He
      was amazed and happy to see that we have restaurants for families and
      for working people. We do not have only McDonalds and super expensive
      restaurants for the very rich as in Dallas and Denver Clan. Maybe it is
      Santa Barbara by you, the television shows that show what America is
      like (they do not). Now some people would say Slovaks love to drink and
      sing and dance. Others say the same about the Gypsies. Some say White
      Men can't dance, which in America is the opposite of Blacks have
      rhythm. Some people want to think that Indian Americans are natural
      born environmentalists.

      In all it is a fascinating world! You have led us into some interesting
      discussions recently. Thanks.

      Ron




      Vladimir Bohinc wrote:
      >
      > Dear Ron,
      > Discussion about all, not all, how many etc never ended successfuly.
      > It is the way one simply sees or says things. Who would go and count them?
      > It is the liberty of every reader, to use his own filter and divide this
      > "all" with whatever he pleases.
      > But, Slovaks have some distinct characteristics, as any other nationalities
      > or ethnic groups too.
      > Some are so well known and so old, that they became stereotypes. I read
      > about them on old slovak books. They always repeat. And Slovaks admit them.
      > There is no and should be no hate involved. Just the heritage of the people.
      > All ethnic groups, that you are mentioning are basically very different from
      > each other. Have different beliefs, religion, traditions, history,values
      > etc.
      > All this is respected.
      > If one studies Slovaks particularly, then certain specific characteristics
      > of men and momen can be found, that are known for centuries.
      > There is nothing wrong with that.
      > And, I would not try to compare Slovakia with America. There is nothing to
      > compare.
      > To answer, what is typically american: ( with humor, please)
      > - Disneyland
      > - Hollywood
      > - Stealth bomber
      > - Coca Cola
      > - Elections
      > - Microsoft
      > - an many other things( sorry, I don't know, how many)
      > All kinds of things are being said on this list. One may agree with some,
      > and with some not. Doesn't matter.
      > It should only serve the purpose to tell the readers, that there are still
      > other "options" and in case of meeting a Slovak or visitng the country,
      > helping "see" more subtle things and thus understand the country and it's
      > people better.
      > Will give you another example, which i find very interesting.
      > Slovaks are known for being very rational. Never do something, if it is not
      > absolutely neccessary and if it does not bring any profit.
      > I am observing them, how they are walking.
      > There are green grass surfaces around the appartment blocks, other public
      > buildings etc. They do not go and use the paved path, but take the shortcut
      > over the grass. So all those ( really all) grass surfaces are crossed in all
      > directions with such paths.In the case of a local Mall, they even tore down
      > the fence, just to have a shortcut.
      > When they approach the bus and railway station, which is in the vicinity,
      > they ignore, that there is a large and dangerous crossroad. They cross it
      > through the middle, through the cars, just taking the shortcut to the bus,
      > which they have on their aim. The age doesn't matter. Can be 70 years old
      > mom.
      > When going to the office, I have to cross the railroad and often have to
      > wait, because it is closed.
      > There are a couple of large companies on the other side. Now, you should see
      > this in the morning or about 2 PM.
      > Hundreds of people, whole crowds, are going through, lifting the barrier,
      > with bycicles, children in carriages, whatever.
      > They cross or stand there, on the rails and wait till the roaring train
      > passes just one meter away from them. Sometimes even two trains are passing,
      > in opposite direction. Doesn't matter. They just ignore the barriers. And,
      > there is an underground passage made for that. Not a single person is using
      > it.
      > I have seen instances, when the co-driver stepped out, raised the barrier
      > and let the car go through.
      > Now, how would one describe this weird custom.
      > I have never seen anything like this in any other country.
      > Vladimir
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Ron Matviyak" <amiak@...>
      > To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Friday, July 04, 2003 9:03 AM
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Visiting your relatives in Slovakia
      >
      > > What is with this nonsense of stereotyping all Slovak men in one mold?
      > > This kind of blind B.S. is what we supposedly find so hateful when
      > > talking about Gypsies, Blacks, Jewish and other people. Why are you
      > > applying this nonsense to Slovaks? Have you ever considered what is
      > > 'typically American'? of 300 million Americans there are 300 million
      > > personalities, and 450 million opinions. Why do you seem to insist that
      > > Slovaks, men or women, be cast in one mold?
      > >
      > > This is nonsense.
      > >
      > > >
      > > > At 11:52 AM 3/07/2003 -0700, you wrote:
      > > > >I have a Slovak friend, who emigrated from Czechoslovakia in 1967 and
      > she
      > > > >said Slovak men were very macho--will not help with the housework,
      > cook,
      > > > >or change the babies, etc.
      > > >
      > > > That agrees with what my mother told me, she said that my father who was
      > a
      > > > macho man was unusual in that he could and would cook and help with the
      > > > housework. That may be because he was the youngest and was looked after
      > by
      > > > his sisters.
      > >
      > >
      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > Slovak-World-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • genie h lalonde
      aChancellor Herman B Wells did that at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana in the 1960 s If my memory serves me.
      Message 83 of 83 , Jul 7, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        aChancellor Herman B Wells did that at Indiana University in Bloomington,
        Indiana in the 1960's If my memory serves me.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.