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Deep Slovak History

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  • Ron
    Deep for depth of time. This is just looking at the influence of the Polish area long before there was a Poland and a Slovakia. I just came to Slovakia from a
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 5 11:58 PM
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      Deep for depth of time. This is just looking at the influence of the Polish area long before there was a Poland and a Slovakia. I just came to Slovakia from a week or so in Poland, poking around the mountains and hiking over the mountain for a beer in Slovakia one day, and several extensions of stay in Krakow, which proved to be a beautiful and captivating city.

      This was about 11 days all together, about half in the Lemko/Rusyn mountain areas and half in Krakow.

      I came with an overloaded backpack since I have a Slovak language school starting Monday, visits in 4 countries, a wedding to attend, and finally 3 weeks to relax discovering new parts and old friends in Slovakia in August.

      To that I reluctantly going home with 2 - 3 lb books from the
      Krakow Archaeology museum on a display showing the cultures and population shifts in Malo Poland over he last 20,000 years of so. The first reference is to Neanderthals 70,000 years ago but concentrates on the overall archaeology record, and it shows surprising shifts in population densities over the thousands of years. There were several periods in the past where settlements were as thick s they are today. That to me is fascinating.

      Why look to Little (southeast) Poland? Because of the lack of western histories on Central Europe and the untold influence settlers in Poland had on Northern Slovakia, and perhaps southern as well. Certainly there was active commerce and exchange for thousands of years. Years ago someone on this forum shocked me with the idea of immigration from Poland rather from the south. You may smile, as you have been a good teacher.

      The second heavy book I bought on the building of Wawel Castle in Krakow they cover the nuts and bolts, literally, of trade in that period, say 1200 to 1600, and enumerate the hiring of Italian architects of the time, buying and prices of materials and sources as well. It also covers the trade routes, sources, and honestly addresses where the records are lacking and the story must be surmised.

      This answers my question of communication throughout Europe and exchange of ideas and timing of the spread of ideas and architecture. Again, western histories most often skip central European references entirely.

      Both of those treasures must wait until I am home in September.
      For today it is head off to see what I can of the Vychodna Festival, and tomorrow down to Bratislava and Modra so I can move in and be ready for school Monday.

      PS. I left the title as 'Deep Slovak History' as an invitation to others who may have stories of what they know or read of the ancient times in the Slovakia neighborhood. This covers the northern side, which seems more neglected than the western and southern historical influences.
    • gene62cu
      Fascinating! Especially so as the results of recent DNA testing suggest the high probability of an ancestor or ancestors at some point in time from present day
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 7 5:00 AM
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        Fascinating! Especially so as the results of recent DNA testing suggest the high probability of an ancestor or ancestors at some point in time from present day Poland. The earliest of record whom I could find were from the eastern village of Vinne in present day Slovakia.


        Eugene Klodzen
        Early surname spelling being KLADZAN


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