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Questions about Slovak Folk Music

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  • dragansk
    I m looking for input from the group on the most popular old Slovak folk songs that would have been known by Slovaks (especially Eastern Slovaks) in the early
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 9 11:04 AM
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      I'm looking for input from the group on the most popular old Slovak folk songs that would have been known by Slovaks (especially Eastern Slovaks) in the early 1900s. My grandmother (b. 1907) knew a number of them, but I don't recall which ones. I've wondered if she learned these songs in Slovakia or here in the Pittsburgh area after she arrived in the U.S. in 1929.

      Because Slovaks in the villages likely didn't have access to radios since they few had electricity, how were they exposed to this popular folk music? Traveling musicians and folk groups, passed down from parents, learned in school?

      Dennis
    • Helen Fedor
      I remember my mom talking about Gypsy bands playing at weddings. She also said that she and her friends liked to dance, so they d think nothing of joining
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 9 12:43 PM
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        I remember my mom talking about Gypsy bands playing at weddings. She also said that she and her friends liked to dance, so they'd think nothing of joining hands to make a karic~ka ("circle" and a type of girls' dance) and singing to accompany their dancing, which was done wherever they happened to gather, somewhere outside.
        H

        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        From: dragansk@...
        Date: Sat, 9 Mar 2013 19:04:36 +0000
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Questions about Slovak Folk Music


























        I'm looking for input from the group on the most popular old Slovak folk songs that would have been known by Slovaks (especially Eastern Slovaks) in the early 1900s. My grandmother (b. 1907) knew a number of them, but I don't recall which ones. I've wondered if she learned these songs in Slovakia or here in the Pittsburgh area after she arrived in the U.S. in 1929.



        Because Slovaks in the villages likely didn't have access to radios since they few had electricity, how were they exposed to this popular folk music? Traveling musicians and folk groups, passed down from parents, learned in school?



        Dennis


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Inez Giles
        Dennis, thanks for asking about the old songs. What a trip down memory lane! The most popular song I can remember my mother singing and signing with Roman
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 9 3:08 PM
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          Dennis, thanks for asking about the old songs. What a trip down memory
          lane! The most popular song I can remember my mother singing and
          signing with Roman Niznik's group is "Tancuj! Tancuj!" (It was part
          of every show we did when we performed at the Nationality Festival at
          the Civic Area.) The other song was "Anicka, dushica, kde si bola"
          We were from McKees Rocks - west of Pittsburgh.



          When I was in Czechoslovakia in 1977 and 1978 as part of SAS, I
          traveled a bit with friends after the sessions ended and we visited
          villages where the "village bands" were rehearsing. The bands would
          rehearse in preparation for participation in the various festivals:
          Vychodna and Detva, come to mind. One major way I believe music
          traditions spread in Slovak was at festivals.



          This is when I know I'm getting old. It seems like just yesterday..
          Thanks again for asking - Inez



          P.S. While I have your attention, so to speak, Is there anyone who
          knows anything about Slovakia's gold embroidery traditions? I don't
          want to "deconstruct" any of my pieces. So I was hoping someone would
          have a thought about this technique. It's referred to as "vysivky na
          cartu" It is gold thread embroidery worked over card board. There was
          a woman in Cifer two/three years ago who offered to sell me a plastic
          template for 100 Euros. It was just a small plastic template - but it
          did have an intricate pattern. Sigh... I thought the price really
          exorbitant at the time. Now? Now, I'm sorry I didn't purchase it. In
          any event, if you have ideas to share, please contact off-line or here
          if you like. Thanks again.



          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dragansk
          Sent: Saturday, March 09, 2013 2:05 PM
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Questions about Slovak Folk Music





          I'm looking for input from the group on the most popular old Slovak
          folk songs that would have been known by Slovaks (especially Eastern
          Slovaks) in the early 1900s. My grandmother (b. 1907) knew a number of
          them, but I don't recall which ones. I've wondered if she learned
          these songs in Slovakia or here in the Pittsburgh area after she
          arrived in the U.S. in 1929.

          Because Slovaks in the villages likely didn't have access to radios
          since they few had electricity, how were they exposed to this popular
          folk music? Traveling musicians and folk groups, passed down from
          parents, learned in school?

          Dennis





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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