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Slovak Aliens in WW II Status

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  • bergschlawiner
    I am wondering what the citizenship status of my Grandfather would have been during WW II when Slovakia was technically an enemy country. Since he immigrated
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 5, 2012
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      I am wondering what the citizenship status of my Grandfather would have been during WW II when Slovakia was technically an enemy country. Since he immigrated in 1905 from Presov, then the Kingdom of Hungary of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and was ethnically Slovak and never became a US citizen what would have been his stutus living in NYC. I vaugely remember someone taking him to some government building in NYC for registration but as what? Could Switzerland or some neutral power have represented the interests of former Slovaks during the war?
      Art
      North Bend WA
    • votrubam
      ... The U.S. recognized the emigre Czechoslovak government in exile (based in London) as the only representative of all of the territory and citizens of
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 5, 2012
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        You probably have your sources, Art, on where he was taken to register what. The following is merely an answer to the question below, what were people like your grandfather seen as by the U.S. during WW II:

        > the Austro-Hungarian Empire and was ethnically Slovak and
        > never became a US citizen what would have been his stutus
        > living in NYC.

        The U.S. recognized the emigre "Czechoslovak government in exile" (based in London) as the only representative of all of the territory and citizens of pre-WW II Czechoslovakia and sent an ambassador to that entity in early 1941 (the same person served as the U.S. ambassador to a number of other "governments in exile" in London during WW II).

        A legal consequence of that was than anyone in the position of your grandfather was seen as a citizen of Czechoslovakia by Washington during that time.

        > Could Switzerland or some neutral power have represented
        > the interests of former Slovaks during the war?

        No. Neutral countries did not maintain interest sections in belligerent countries on behalf of the citizens of their enemies, although even that would have been formally impossible between Bratislava and Washington during WW II. Slovakia's President Jozef Tiso signed a declaration of war on the U.S. in December 1941. But Washington took no formal notice of the declaration, it had recognized the "Czechoslovak government in exile" much earlier (see above) and, as a result, the Unites States did not consider Slovakia to be a political entity during WW II.


        Martin
      • Art
        ... A legal consequence of that was than anyone in the position of your grandfather was seen as a citizen of Czechoslovakia by Washington during that time. ...
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 7, 2012
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          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
          A legal consequence of that was than anyone in the position of your grandfather was seen as a citizen of Czechoslovakia by Washington during that time.
          >
          Don't believe he had anything to do with Czechs and no one in the family had anything to do with Czechs and still were calling themselve's "Hungarians" throughout WW II and later and sometimes calling themselves "Austrians" both of which would have made them enemy aliens.
        • votrubam
          ... Most Slovaks, Rusyns, Hungarians who lived in Czecho-Slovakia before WW II didn t. The Slovaks called themselves Slovaks, etc., but their citizenship as
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 7, 2012
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            > Don't believe he had anything to do with Czechs

            Most Slovaks, Rusyns, Hungarians who lived in Czecho-Slovakia before WW II didn't. The Slovaks called themselves Slovaks, etc., but their citizenship as formally seen by the U.S. had nothing to do with their own identity.

            The answer addressed only what the U.S. government saw them as during WW II: the State Department saw them as citizens of (the then non-existent) Czechoslovakia. Those are the wonders of international diplomacy. That's all.


            Martin
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