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Most Emotional Countries

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  • Ron
    Slovakia and east-central Europe seem to be in the middle of this ranking in the Washington Post. A color-coded map of the world s most and least emotional
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 29, 2012
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      Slovakia and east-central Europe seem to be in the middle of this ranking in the Washington Post.

      A color-coded map of the world's most and least emotional countries

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2012/11/28/a-color-coded-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-emotional-countries/?tid=pm_world_pop





      http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2012/11/28/a-color-coded-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-emotional-countries/?tid=pm_world_pop

      The former Soviet Union ....

      Post-Soviet countries are consistently among the most stoic. Other than Singapore (and, for some reason, Madagascar and Nepal), the least emotional countries in the world are all former members of the Soviet Union. They are also the greatest consumers of cigarettes and alcohol. This could be what you call and chicken-or-egg problem: if the two trends are related, which one came first? Europe appears almost like a gradient here, with emotions increasing as you move West.
    • votrubam
      Thanks, Ron, very useful. ... Almost all of Central Europe: Germany and Austria are color-coded the same as Slovakia, Poland, Hungary. Only the Czechs scored
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 29, 2012
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        Thanks, Ron, very useful.

        > Slovakia and east-central Europe seem to be in the
        > middle of this ranking in the Washington Post.

        Almost all of Central Europe: Germany and Austria are color-coded the same as Slovakia, Poland, Hungary. Only the Czechs scored a little lower and the Swiss higher.

        The WP report obscures one thing when it only mentions "The more times that people answer 'yes' to questions such as 'Did you smile or laugh a lot yesterday?,' the more emotional they're deemed to be."

        Some of the questions were like the above, about "happiness," but others were about negative experiences. To score high on emotionality, the polled nations had to rank high in reporting a certain number of positive as well as negative feelings during the previous day.

        The results defy some common European stereotypes -- the Italians score lower on emotionality, the northerners, Swedes, Danes, Finns, Brits, score higher.

        At the same time, except for Italy, they match the European stereotype of the Romance ("Latin") nations as excessively emotional, and a European stereotypical take on the Americans, here delivered by an American of Yankee and Czech parentage (<http://tinyurl.com/c9wem8s>): "Americans are like children: noisy, curious, unable to keep a secret, not given to subtlety, and prone to misbehave in public."


        Martin
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