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A gentle reminder or How I made a social Faux Pas

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  • whiteox_nelson
    I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
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      <blush>
      I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
      This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.

      Deadly silence was the response!

      Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.

      I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....

      Peter M.
    • Caye Caswick
      Peter, that was going on almost 40 years ago -- things have drastically changed since then. ________________________________ From: whiteox_nelson
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 10, 2012
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        Peter, that was going on almost 40 years ago -- things have drastically changed since then.




        ________________________________
        From: whiteox_nelson <htcstech@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 8:26 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] A gentle reminder or How I made a social Faux Pas


         
        <blush>
        I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
        This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.

        Deadly silence was the response!

        Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.

        I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....

        Peter M.




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • genmom4
        I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia. When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 12, 2012
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          I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia.
          When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not have a computer that had a disc drive, so I went out and purchased a CD player (hand held device). It was rather expensive by my standards, but I was rather desperate to learn the language.
          I had several old models at home from the kids over the years, but had not realized that I would need one in Slovakia, or I could have certainly brought one with me.
          Can't say that it helped much as the batteries died within short time and it did not have a charger.
          I left it with my cousin in Bratislava. She seemed thrilled with it, but I can't really see her using it.

          Also left the 8 euro fan that I bought while I was there. Now, that IS something that I can see her using in the heat of the summer.

          But I would be surprised if air conditioners would be something that you will see in Slovakia in private homes or flats. People handle the heat rather well there. I was rather surprised to find that even the busses were not air conditioned. I had hoped that hopping on a bus would result in a brief respite from the heat. No such luck!

          Plus, air conditioners would result in extra money paid out to run them.

          Also, I presumed that there were no screens because there were very few flies. At least we didn't see many. But we did have a large swallow population sharing premises with us, so perhaps they are the reason for the low fly population in Modra.

          Although i have the impression that you were joking about carrying these two items, my opinion would be that both are an unnecessary expense, and that is why the people in Slovakia do not have them. Because they do carry around pretty expensive cell phones, which, by the way, I do not have. But, I do have here in the US. Central air conditioning, and screens in the windows for when I choose to not use it!

          Barbara




          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "whiteox_nelson" <htcstech@...> wrote:
          >
          > <blush>
          > I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
          > This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.
          >
          > Deadly silence was the response!
          >
          > Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.
          >
          > I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....
          >
          > Peter M.
          >
        • Ron
          Window screens seem to be more a part of American culture than European. Perhaps we haven t cleared as many swamps as they have. In Germany, where they define
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 12, 2012
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            Window screens seem to be more a part of American culture than European. Perhaps we haven't cleared as many swamps as they have. In Germany, where they define cleanliness as whatever Germans decide it is, they look upon window screens as superfluous American peculiarity. I am not sure if they have become more common in modern Slovak construction. Air conditioning and electric clothes dryers are two luxuries that - in the past, in 'rich' Germany - were too expensive to operate. How it is in Slovakia today I will leave for a resident Slovak to say.

            Yes, for a long time they have had access to everything, just as we have had. Like us, it is a matter of what is affordable and where their desires lie. In the 90's I had fun taking over American products when I lived in Germany and had access to the commissary. It was more in the spirit of sharing an American variety since most often their products were from other countries.

            Nowadays I generally will try for colorful Alaska t shirts for the young kids and perhaps a box of Alaska smoked salmon for the families, but that latter is bulky and heavy, though sometimes highly appreciated.

            PS. I also had Slovak language CD\s in school, and happily a fellow student copied them onto a flash drive, and I transferred them to my netbook and MP3 player.

            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "genmom4" <geismom@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia.
            > When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not have a computer that had a disc drive, so I went out and purchased a CD player (hand held device). It was rather expensive by my standards, but I was rather desperate to learn the language.
            > I had several old models at home from the kids over the years, but had not realized that I would need one in Slovakia, or I could have certainly brought one with me.
            > Can't say that it helped much as the batteries died within short time and it did not have a charger.
            > I left it with my cousin in Bratislava. She seemed thrilled with it, but I can't really see her using it.
            >
            > Also left the 8 euro fan that I bought while I was there. Now, that IS something that I can see her using in the heat of the summer.
            >
            > But I would be surprised if air conditioners would be something that you will see in Slovakia in private homes or flats. People handle the heat rather well there. I was rather surprised to find that even the busses were not air conditioned. I had hoped that hopping on a bus would result in a brief respite from the heat. No such luck!
            >
            > Plus, air conditioners would result in extra money paid out to run them.
            >
            > Also, I presumed that there were no screens because there were very few flies. At least we didn't see many. But we did have a large swallow population sharing premises with us, so perhaps they are the reason for the low fly population in Modra.
            >
            > Although i have the impression that you were joking about carrying these two items, my opinion would be that both are an unnecessary expense, and that is why the people in Slovakia do not have them. Because they do carry around pretty expensive cell phones, which, by the way, I do not have. But, I do have here in the US. Central air conditioning, and screens in the windows for when I choose to not use it!
            >
            > Barbara
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "whiteox_nelson" <htcstech@> wrote:
            > >
            > > <blush>
            > > I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
            > > This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.
            > >
            > > Deadly silence was the response!
            > >
            > > Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.
            > >
            > > I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....
            > >
            > > Peter M.
            > >
            >
          • William C. Wormuth
            http://www.chladenie.org/ ________________________________ From: genmom4 To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 12, 2012
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              http://www.chladenie.org/



              ________________________________
              From: genmom4 <geismom@...>
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:08 AM
              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: A gentle reminder or How I made a social Faux Pas


               


              I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia.
              When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not have a computer that had a disc drive, so I went out and purchased a CD player (hand held device). It was rather expensive by my standards, but I was rather desperate to learn the language.
              I had several old models at home from the kids over the years, but had not realized that I would need one in Slovakia, or I could have certainly brought one with me.
              Can't say that it helped much as the batteries died within short time and it did not have a charger.
              I left it with my cousin in Bratislava. She seemed thrilled with it, but I can't really see her using it.

              Also left the 8 euro fan that I bought while I was there. Now, that IS something that I can see her using in the heat of the summer.

              But I would be surprised if air conditioners would be something that you will see in Slovakia in private homes or flats. People handle the heat rather well there. I was rather surprised to find that even the busses were not air conditioned. I had hoped that hopping on a bus would result in a brief respite from the heat. No such luck!

              Plus, air conditioners would result in extra money paid out to run them.

              Also, I presumed that there were no screens because there were very few flies. At least we didn't see many. But we did have a large swallow population sharing premises with us, so perhaps they are the reason for the low fly population in Modra.

              Although i have the impression that you were joking about carrying these two items, my opinion would be that both are an unnecessary expense, and that is why the people in Slovakia do not have them. Because they do carry around pretty expensive cell phones, which, by the way, I do not have. But, I do have here in the US. Central air conditioning, and screens in the windows for when I choose to not use it!

              Barbara

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "whiteox_nelson" <htcstech@...> wrote:
              >
              > <blush>
              > I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
              > This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.
              >
              > Deadly silence was the response!
              >
              > Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.
              >
              > I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....
              >
              > Peter M.
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • William C. Wormuth
              Now I have time to add a comment along with the Air conditioner sale site. AC s have been available for years now but unlike here, people are not spoiled and
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 12, 2012
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                Now I have time to add a comment along with the Air conditioner sale site.


                AC's have been available for years now but unlike here, people are not spoiled and acclimate to the hot weather.

                Window screens are and have been available but the old style windows ar not designed for them.  Most older homes have "crank"  to open windows and they open toward the inside.

                Plastic window and door businesses are everywhere and people modernize when money is available.

                  http://www.123dodavatel.sk/dvere-a-vrata-vyroba-plastove

                Z Bohom,

                Vilo



                ________________________________
                From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 2:34 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: A gentle reminder or How I made a social Faux Pas


                 
                http://www.chladenie.org/

                ________________________________
                From: genmom4 <geismom@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:08 AM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: A gentle reminder or How I made a social Faux Pas


                 

                I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia.
                When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not have a computer that had a disc drive, so I went out and purchased a CD player (hand held device). It was rather expensive by my standards, but I was rather desperate to learn the language.
                I had several old models at home from the kids over the years, but had not realized that I would need one in Slovakia, or I could have certainly brought one with me.
                Can't say that it helped much as the batteries died within short time and it did not have a charger.
                I left it with my cousin in Bratislava. She seemed thrilled with it, but I can't really see her using it.

                Also left the 8 euro fan that I bought while I was there. Now, that IS something that I can see her using in the heat of the summer.

                But I would be surprised if air conditioners would be something that you will see in Slovakia in private homes or flats. People handle the heat rather well there. I was rather surprised to find that even the busses were not air conditioned. I had hoped that hopping on a bus would result in a brief respite from the heat. No such luck!

                Plus, air conditioners would result in extra money paid out to run them.

                Also, I presumed that there were no screens because there were very few flies. At least we didn't see many. But we did have a large swallow population sharing premises with us, so perhaps they are the reason for the low fly population in Modra.

                Although i have the impression that you were joking about carrying these two items, my opinion would be that both are an unnecessary expense, and that is why the people in Slovakia do not have them. Because they do carry around pretty expensive cell phones, which, by the way, I do not have. But, I do have here in the US. Central air conditioning, and screens in the windows for when I choose to not use it!

                Barbara

                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "whiteox_nelson" <htcstech@...> wrote:
                >
                > <blush>
                > I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
                > This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.
                >
                > Deadly silence was the response!
                >
                > Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.
                >
                > I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....
                >
                > Peter M.
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • whiteox_nelson
                Thanks for your replies everyone! My original intention was to surreptiously find out if there was anything particular that was hard to get so I can start
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 13, 2012
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                  Thanks for your replies everyone!

                  My original intention was to surreptiously find out if there was anything particular that was hard to get so I can start thinking about presents. I did also ask what kind of fashions (read trends) there are.
                  Looks like I'll be taking typical sort of stuff like t-shirts and specialist foodstuffs.

                  Peter M.

                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Ron" <amiak27@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Window screens seem to be more a part of American culture than European. Perhaps we haven't cleared as many swamps as they have. In Germany, where they define cleanliness as whatever Germans decide it is, they look upon window screens as superfluous American peculiarity. I am not sure if they have become more common in modern Slovak construction. Air conditioning and electric clothes dryers are two luxuries that - in the past, in 'rich' Germany - were too expensive to operate. How it is in Slovakia today I will leave for a resident Slovak to say.
                  >
                  > Yes, for a long time they have had access to everything, just as we have had. Like us, it is a matter of what is affordable and where their desires lie. In the 90's I had fun taking over American products when I lived in Germany and had access to the commissary. It was more in the spirit of sharing an American variety since most often their products were from other countries.
                  >
                  > Nowadays I generally will try for colorful Alaska t shirts for the young kids and perhaps a box of Alaska smoked salmon for the families, but that latter is bulky and heavy, though sometimes highly appreciated.
                  >
                  > PS. I also had Slovak language CD\s in school, and happily a fellow student copied them onto a flash drive, and I transferred them to my netbook and MP3 player.
                  >
                  > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "genmom4" <geismom@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I would agree, Peter, that just about everything that we have here is available in Slovakia.
                  > > When I took the language course, it came with a CD, but I did not have a computer that had a disc drive, so I went out and purchased a CD player (hand held device). It was rather expensive by my standards, but I was rather desperate to learn the language.
                  > > I had several old models at home from the kids over the years, but had not realized that I would need one in Slovakia, or I could have certainly brought one with me.
                  > > Can't say that it helped much as the batteries died within short time and it did not have a charger.
                  > > I left it with my cousin in Bratislava. She seemed thrilled with it, but I can't really see her using it.
                  > >
                  > > Also left the 8 euro fan that I bought while I was there. Now, that IS something that I can see her using in the heat of the summer.
                  > >
                  > > But I would be surprised if air conditioners would be something that you will see in Slovakia in private homes or flats. People handle the heat rather well there. I was rather surprised to find that even the busses were not air conditioned. I had hoped that hopping on a bus would result in a brief respite from the heat. No such luck!
                  > >
                  > > Plus, air conditioners would result in extra money paid out to run them.
                  > >
                  > > Also, I presumed that there were no screens because there were very few flies. At least we didn't see many. But we did have a large swallow population sharing premises with us, so perhaps they are the reason for the low fly population in Modra.
                  > >
                  > > Although i have the impression that you were joking about carrying these two items, my opinion would be that both are an unnecessary expense, and that is why the people in Slovakia do not have them. Because they do carry around pretty expensive cell phones, which, by the way, I do not have. But, I do have here in the US. Central air conditioning, and screens in the windows for when I choose to not use it!
                  > >
                  > > Barbara
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "whiteox_nelson" <htcstech@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > <blush>
                  > > > I went to Hungary in 1979 and I was quickly led to the underground economy by a relative who insisted that I buy a large box of Apple scented soap from one of the international hotels which he later sold on the streets of Budapest for much more than the current exchange rate of the time.
                  > > > This stuck in my head every since and so, wondering if there is a fashion or need for something 'Western', I asked my Slovak and Hungarian relatives via Facebook the same question.
                  > > >
                  > > > Deadly silence was the response!
                  > > >
                  > > > Only a single reply that 'everything is available' but the expensive Euro makes many things unaffordable for most people.
                  > > >
                  > > > I don't know how many air conditioners and fly screens I can take with me on the plane next year.....
                  > > >
                  > > > Peter M.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Mader, Michelle A. (GRC-CHC0)
                  ... I was last in Germany, Switzerland and France in 2005. My family and I were all surprised by both the lack of window screens and of air conditioning (A/C
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 16, 2012
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                    Ron wrote:
                    >Window screens seem to be more a part of American culture than European. Perhaps we haven't cleared as many swamps as they have. In Germany, where they define cleanliness as whatever Germans decide it is, they look upon window screens as >superfluous American peculiarity. I am not sure if they have become more common in modern Slovak construction. Air conditioning and electric clothes dryers are two luxuries that - in the past, in 'rich' Germany - were too expensive to operate. How it is >in Slovakia today I will leave for a resident Slovak to say.

                    I was last in Germany, Switzerland and France in 2005. My family and I were all surprised by both the lack of window screens and of air conditioning (A/C was widely available in France). It was a particularly hot summer and A/C would certainly have been welcome in restaurants and hotels. As it was, windows were opened and flies bothered us in almost every restaurant we frequented. In the beginning, I was concerned about birds flying into the hotel room but it was never an issue.

                    Michelle Maco Mader
                    Cleveland, Ohio USA


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    http://www.expatica.com/de/news/german-news/slovakian-pm-sets-ultimatum-for-gdf-suez-eon-on-gas-price-hike_247406.html I have friends who dislike the PM and
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 16, 2012
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                      http://www.expatica.com/de/news/german-news/slovakian-pm-sets-ultimatum-for-gdf-suez-eon-on-gas-price-hike_247406.html


                      I have friends who dislike the PM and call him a "socialist but this kind of "socialist", I like.  I have always believed that he was good and cared for Slovakia and the modern life the people have.

                      This article is a reflection of what is happening here, where businesses are taking advantage of the people by devising schemes to bleed us dry, (as are oil companies, presently).  Greed should not be misconstrued as "anti-capitalism"


                      Inflation in Slovakia has been a modest 3.8% and if the gas companies were allowed a 25% hike, the percentage would starve the ordinary citizen.

                      I am proud that Slovakia is comparatively successful, (within the EU), in maintaining their Economy.  They have come a very long way and with the help of God will Go much further.

                      Z Bohom,

                      Vilo



                      ________________________________

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • William C. Wormuth
                      Special Greetings to all on Slovak-World ________________________________ From: William C. Wormuth To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 31, 2012
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                        Special Greetings to all on Slovak-World



                        ________________________________
                        From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                        To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:50 PM
                        Subject: Prime Minister Robert Fico


                        http://www.expatica.com/de/news/german-news/slovakian-pm-sets-ultimatum-for-gdf-suez-eon-on-gas-price-hike_247406.html


                        I have friends who dislike the PM and call him a "socialist but this kind of "socialist", I like.  I have always believed that he was good and cared for Slovakia and the modern life the people have.

                        This article is a reflection of what is happening here, where businesses are taking advantage of the people by devising schemes to bleed us dry, (as are oil companies, presently).  Greed should not be misconstrued as "anti-capitalism"


                        Inflation in Slovakia has been a modest 3.8% and if the gas companies were allowed a 25% hike, the percentage would starve the ordinary citizen.

                        I am proud that Slovakia is comparatively successful, (within the EU), in maintaining their Economy.  They have come a very long way and with the help of God will Go much further.

                        Z Bohom,

                        Vilo



                        ________________________________

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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