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RE: [Slovak-World] The Slovak Cymbalom

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  • Armata, Joseph R
    OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let s get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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      OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let's get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a harpsichord!

      In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians? (In Poland. it was earlier a Jewish urban instrument that spread to Polish village bands in the Rzeszow area in the late 19th century.)

      Joe


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
      Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:03 AM
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Chuck Norris vs The Slovak Cymbal

      Awwww, c'mon Ben,

      Can't you come up with any more Gypsies to play.  I'll look hard to find a Slovak who actually plays the traditional Cigansky instrument called a Fujar.


      I posted the message statement that Americans think the Cymbal to be a "Gypsy" instrumentand wanted all here to know it was not exclusive to the Romi so not only did you post Romi playing but even them singing in their own language.

      By the way you forgot the Farkash family who played in Vienna when I first went to Slovakia in 1971.  They not only played, EXCLUSIVLY for me in the Restaurant Slovakia but Got me drunk on Slivovica and fed me a Big Dinner.

      When I left the place and staggered toward my hotel, I heard the beautiful music again and staggered into the Hungarian restaurant.  after a few peices of music I staggered up and asked if they knew any SLOVAK songs I was then physically removed with words NEM, NEM, NEM,... Buta toth.  I think the latter means "Saintly person". :o) :o) :o)

      Forever and ever, AMEN!

      Z Bohom,

      Vilko
    • William C. Wormuth
      Alright Joe, So I do like Ben....but don t tell him I was only joking.... Z Bohom ________________________________ From: Armata, Joseph R
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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        Alright Joe,

        So I do like Ben....but don't tell him I was only joking....

        Z Bohom



        ________________________________
        From: "Armata, Joseph R" <armata@...>
        To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 9:06 AM
        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] The Slovak Cymbalom


         
        OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let's get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a harpsichord!

        In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians? (In Poland. it was earlier a Jewish urban instrument that spread to Polish village bands in the Rzeszow area in the late 19th century.)

        Joe

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
        Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:03 AM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Chuck Norris vs The Slovak Cymbal

        Awwww, c'mon Ben,

        Can't you come up with any more Gypsies to play.  I'll look hard to find a Slovak who actually plays the traditional Cigansky instrument called a Fujar.

        I posted the message statement that Americans think the Cymbal to be a "Gypsy" instrumentand wanted all here to know it was not exclusive to the Romi so not only did you post Romi playing but even them singing in their own language.

        By the way you forgot the Farkash family who played in Vienna when I first went to Slovakia in 1971.  They not only played, EXCLUSIVLY for me in the Restaurant Slovakia but Got me drunk on Slivovica and fed me a Big Dinner.

        When I left the place and staggered toward my hotel, I heard the beautiful music again and staggered into the Hungarian restaurant.  after a few peices of music I staggered up and asked if they knew any SLOVAK songs I was then physically removed with words NEM, NEM, NEM,... Buta toth.  I think the latter means "Saintly person". :o) :o) :o)

        Forever and ever, AMEN!

        Z Bohom,

        Vilko




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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          > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban
          > instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians?

          It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early 1700s.

          "Urban" (in a sense) played a role, too, as you assume, Joe -- it became quite fashionable with the nobility and the "suave classes" (pa'ni) early on (the 1700s at the latest), who hired Gypsy as well as non-Gypsy musicians, the noblemen's and panske parties were among the places where bands from the farming villages would often pick it up.

          So, by the 1800s, it was not unusual to find Slovak village bands with a cymbalom, although it remained quite uncommon along the Galician border, which may tie in with what you said about its occurrence and presence in Poland. Still, the cymbalom probably remained substantially more common in Gypsy bands.


          Martin
        • William C. Wormuth
          Martin, Slovak-World is a site for learning about our heritage and with You, Ben and Joe we all do learn. The humor we inject is also part of our heritage. 
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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            Martin,

            Slovak-World is a site for learning about our heritage and with You, Ben and Joe we all do learn.

            The humor we inject is also part of our heritage.  So my thanks to all participants.

            S Panem Bohom.






            ________________________________
            From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 2:22 PM
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


             
            > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban
            > instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians?

            It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early 1700s.

            "Urban" (in a sense) played a role, too, as you assume, Joe -- it became quite fashionable with the nobility and the "suave classes" (pa'ni) early on (the 1700s at the latest), who hired Gypsy as well as non-Gypsy musicians, the noblemen's and panske parties were among the places where bands from the farming villages would often pick it up.

            So, by the 1800s, it was not unusual to find Slovak village bands with a cymbalom, although it remained quite uncommon along the Galician border, which may tie in with what you said about its occurrence and presence in Poland. Still, the cymbalom probably remained substantially more common in Gypsy bands.

            Martin




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • BJLK@aol.com
            I have a question about the evolution of the instrument . . . For some background: When I was quite young and growing up in Chicago, we celebrated Slovak Day
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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              I have a question about the evolution of the instrument . . .

              For some background: When I was quite young and growing up in Chicago, we
              celebrated Slovak Day in Pilsen Park every summer. The event included many
              Roma bands--some small ensembles (or even single accordion players) that
              roamed the long outdoor bar (whose taps were connected directly to the Yusay
              Brewery) who would play requests for coins, some larger groups of about 5 to
              7 musicians (with several stringed instruments plus a wind instrument or
              two of some kind--and always a cymbalom) who would occupy raised podiums on
              the park grounds, up to a rather large orchestra with a full range of
              instruments who played on the ballroom stage in the main building). At that
              time, Slovak wedding celebrations in our area always included a Roma band,
              complete with cymbalom, whose size would depend upon how much expense the
              bride's father could afford for the reception.

              I was always fascinated by the construction of the various kinds of
              cymbalom--many of the instruments used strings similar to a piano-like
              construction, and came in a wide variety of sizes ranging from rather small, portable
              tables that folded up into a carrying bag, some looking like they were
              home-made, right up to larger, more elaborate, beautifully carved instruments,
              with many more strings than the small ones, that required two or more
              people to carry. The larger instruments fairly closely resembled the ones I saw
              on YouTube being played by Ernest Sarkozy. However, the modern instruments
              now appear to have thin, shiny metal strips instead of (in addition to?)
              the old-fashioned strings that I remember. The"striking" instruments
              (hammers?) also appear to have also evolved. Some of the older ones were just thin
              metal rods with thick wads of cotton held together with the old-fashioned
              fabric tape that used to be used for bandages. The newer ones now appear to
              be more carefully shaped and crafted.

              Does anyone have any insights or information about how this instrument has
              changed in the past 70 to 80 years? Are any of the really old ones still
              being played?

              As always, with questions,

              B. J.


              _________________________
              B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@...)




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • William C. Wormuth
              Enjoy the display of a really happy group, just across The Slovak Border in Moravia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynLt9OiH6lY&feature=BFa&list=UL6bXLCi9_KK0
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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                Enjoy the display of a really happy group, just across The Slovak Border in Moravia

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynLt9OiH6lY&feature=BFa&list=UL6bXLCi9_KK0


                ________________________________
                From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 4:42 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


                Martin,

                Slovak-World is a site for learning about our heritage and with You, Ben and Joe we all do learn.

                The humor we inject is also part of our heritage.  So my thanks to all participants.

                S Panem Bohom.






                ________________________________
                From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 2:22 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


                 
                > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban
                > instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians?

                It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early 1700s.

                "Urban" (in a sense) played a role, too, as you assume, Joe -- it became quite fashionable with the nobility and the "suave classes" (pa'ni) early on (the 1700s at the latest), who hired Gypsy as well as non-Gypsy musicians, the noblemen's and panske parties were among the places where bands from the farming villages would often pick it up.

                So, by the 1800s, it was not unusual to find Slovak village bands with a cymbalom, although it remained quite uncommon along the Galician border, which may tie in with what you said about its occurrence and presence in Poland. Still, the cymbalom probably remained substantially more common in Gypsy bands.

                Martin




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Marianne Herrmann
                Love, love, love the link and how they spotlight those wonderful children! ... From: William C. Wormuth To: Slovak-World
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 24, 2012
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                  Love, love, love the link and how they spotlight those wonderful children!



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                  To: Slovak-World <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Mon, Sep 24, 2012 7:12 pm
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom





                  Enjoy the display of a really happy group, just across The Slovak Border in Moravia

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynLt9OiH6lY&feature=BFa&list=UL6bXLCi9_KK0

                  ________________________________
                  From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 4:42 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


                  Martin,

                  Slovak-World is a site for learning about our heritage and with You, Ben and Joe we all do learn.

                  The humor we inject is also part of our heritage. So my thanks to all participants.

                  S Panem Bohom.

                  ________________________________
                  From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 2:22 PM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom



                  > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban
                  > instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians?

                  It seem certain that it started spreading and spread through Gypsy bands, but quite a while back. Some early records are from the late 1600s and early 1700s.

                  "Urban" (in a sense) played a role, too, as you assume, Joe -- it became quite fashionable with the nobility and the "suave classes" (pa'ni) early on (the 1700s at the latest), who hired Gypsy as well as non-Gypsy musicians, the noblemen's and panske parties were among the places where bands from the farming villages would often pick it up.

                  So, by the 1800s, it was not unusual to find Slovak village bands with a cymbalom, although it remained quite uncommon along the Galician border, which may tie in with what you said about its occurrence and presence in Poland. Still, the cymbalom probably remained substantially more common in Gypsy bands.

                  Martin

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Greg
                  Prior to breakup of Czechoslovakia, the former country issued some interesting stamps with musical instruments. Look at eBay auction 370648983023 Greg
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 26, 2012
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                    Prior to breakup of Czechoslovakia, the former country issued
                    some interesting stamps with musical instruments.

                    Look at eBay auction 370648983023

                    Greg


                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Armata, Joseph R" <armata@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let's get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a harpsichord!
                    >
                    > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians? (In Poland. it was earlier a Jewish urban instrument that spread to Polish village bands in the Rzeszow area in the late 19th century.)
                    >
                    > Joe
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
                    > Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:03 AM
                    > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Chuck Norris vs The Slovak Cymbal
                    >
                    > Awwww, c'mon Ben,
                    >
                    > Can't you come up with any more Gypsies to play.  I'll look hard to find a Slovak who actually plays the traditional Cigansky instrument called a Fujar.
                    >
                    >
                    > I posted the message statement that Americans think the Cymbal to be a "Gypsy" instrumentand wanted all here to know it was not exclusive to the Romi so not only did you post Romi playing but even them singing in their own language.
                    >
                    > By the way you forgot the Farkash family who played in Vienna when I first went to Slovakia in 1971.  They not only played, EXCLUSIVLY for me in the Restaurant Slovakia but Got me drunk on Slivovica and fed me a Big Dinner.
                    >
                    > When I left the place and staggered toward my hotel, I heard the beautiful music again and staggered into the Hungarian restaurant.  after a few peices of music I staggered up and asked if they knew any SLOVAK songs I was then physically removed with words NEM, NEM, NEM,... Buta toth.  I think the latter means "Saintly person". :o) :o) :o)
                    >
                    > Forever and ever, AMEN!
                    >
                    > Z Bohom,
                    >
                    > Vilko
                    >
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Different-Musical-Instrument-Stamps-Czechoslovakia-/370648983023 ________________________________ From: Greg
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 26, 2012
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                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Different-Musical-Instrument-Stamps-Czechoslovakia-/370648983023


                      ________________________________
                      From: Greg <greg@...>
                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:24 AM
                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


                       
                      Prior to breakup of Czechoslovakia, the former country issued
                      some interesting stamps with musical instruments.

                      Look at eBay auction 370648983023

                      Greg

                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Armata, Joseph R" <armata@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let's get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a harpsichord!
                      >
                      > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians? (In Poland. it was earlier a Jewish urban instrument that spread to Polish village bands in the Rzeszow area in the late 19th century.)
                      >
                      > Joe
                      >
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
                      > Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:03 AM
                      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Chuck Norris vs The Slovak Cymbal
                      >
                      > Awwww, c'mon Ben,
                      >
                      > Can't you come up with any more Gypsies to play.  I'll look hard to find a Slovak who actually plays the traditional Cigansky instrument called a Fujar.
                      >
                      >
                      > I posted the message statement that Americans think the Cymbal to be a "Gypsy" instrumentand wanted all here to know it was not exclusive to the Romi so not only did you post Romi playing but even them singing in their own language.
                      >
                      > By the way you forgot the Farkash family who played in Vienna when I first went to Slovakia in 1971.  They not only played, EXCLUSIVLY for me in the Restaurant Slovakia but Got me drunk on Slivovica and fed me a Big Dinner.
                      >
                      > When I left the place and staggered toward my hotel, I heard the beautiful music again and staggered into the Hungarian restaurant.  after a few peices of music I staggered up and asked if they knew any SLOVAK songs I was then physically removed with words NEM, NEM, NEM,... Buta toth.  I think the latter means "Saintly person". :o) :o) :o)
                      >
                      > Forever and ever, AMEN!
                      >
                      > Z Bohom,
                      >
                      > Vilko
                      >




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • William C. Wormuth
                      I have A cousin living in Strani-Kvetna,North west of Nove Mesto Nad Vahom.  Although there are two names the villages are together as one, the Church being
                      Message 10 of 16 , Sep 28, 2012
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                        I have A cousin living in Strani-Kvetna,North west of Nove Mesto Nad Vahom.  Although there are two names the villages are together as one, the Church being in Strani and the famous Glass Works, (formerly part of Bohemian Glass),  called Moravian Glass.

                        The Towns are the most Folklorist I have ever witnessed.  They have 2 Brass bands , two Cymbalom Bands, (One are young Children),  Men and Women's choruses, Dancers and a theater group.

                        I recently received a call from my cousin and she brought back many memories from there including, weddings, and Hody, both of which I attended regularly during my visits to Slovakia.

                        She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village and I watched many in the last few days.  I just finished one which I attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:

                         http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related

                        Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.  Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler buildings.


                        Petrov:


                        http://marketplace.veer.com/stock-photo/wine-cellar-Petrov-Plze-Czech-4634254

                        Dolni Bojanovice:

                        http://www.podluzi.cz/turistika/en/touristic-guide

                        Young people in these towns remain interested is their folklore and I hope many places in Slovakia will promote the same.  I would appreciate hearing from members here if they are familiar with Slovak towns who are preserving these customs.

                        Z Bohom,

                        Vilo



                         



                        ________________________________
                        From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                        To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 10:27 AM
                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom



                        http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Different-Musical-Instrument-Stamps-Czechoslovakia-/370648983023


                        ________________________________
                        From: Greg <greg@...>
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:24 AM
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: The Slovak Cymbalom


                         
                        Prior to breakup of Czechoslovakia, the former country issued
                        some interesting stamps with musical instruments.

                        Look at eBay auction 370648983023

                        Greg

                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Armata, Joseph R" <armata@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > OK Vilko, have a cup of coffee and let's get it straight - cymbals are those metal platters you crash together, cymbalom is the stringed instrument like a harpsichord!
                        >
                        > In Slovakia, was the cymbalom earlier a Gypsy/urban instrument, which later spread to Slovak musicians? (In Poland. it was earlier a Jewish urban instrument that spread to Polish village bands in the Rzeszow area in the late 19th century.)
                        >
                        > Joe
                        >
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
                        > Sent: Monday, September 24, 2012 1:03 AM
                        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Chuck Norris vs The Slovak Cymbal
                        >
                        > Awwww, c'mon Ben,
                        >
                        > Can't you come up with any more Gypsies to play.  I'll look hard to find a Slovak who actually plays the traditional Cigansky instrument called a Fujar.
                        >
                        >
                        > I posted the message statement that Americans think the Cymbal to be a "Gypsy" instrumentand wanted all here to know it was not exclusive to the Romi so not only did you post Romi playing but even them singing in their own language.
                        >
                        > By the way you forgot the Farkash family who played in Vienna when I first went to Slovakia in 1971.  They not only played, EXCLUSIVLY for me in the Restaurant Slovakia but Got me drunk on Slivovica and fed me a Big Dinner.
                        >
                        > When I left the place and staggered toward my hotel, I heard the beautiful music again and staggered into the Hungarian restaurant.  after a few peices of music I staggered up and asked if they knew any SLOVAK songs I was then physically removed with words NEM, NEM, NEM,... Buta toth.  I think the latter means "Saintly person". :o) :o) :o)
                        >
                        > Forever and ever, AMEN!
                        >
                        > Z Bohom,
                        >
                        > Vilko
                        >




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Joe Armata
                        Oj Vilo, that schmaltzy music just melts my heart, it s so touching! It s easy to see why you love the area so much. Thanks for the link. Joe
                        Message 11 of 16 , Sep 29, 2012
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                          Oj Vilo, that schmaltzy music just melts my heart, it's so touching!
                          It's easy to see why you love the area so much. Thanks for the link.

                          Joe


                          > She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village
                          > and I watched many in the last few days. I just finished one which I
                          > attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:
                          >
                          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related
                          >
                          > Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and
                          > many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.
                          > Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler
                          > buildings.
                          >
                        • Joe Armata
                          Oh, and I meant to ask, why is it a muzsky zbor?! Isn t the dulcimer player the only male in the group? Joe
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 29, 2012
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                            Oh, and I meant to ask, why is it a "muzsky" zbor?! Isn't the dulcimer
                            player the only male in the group?

                            Joe


                            >
                            > I recently received a call from my cousin and she brought back many
                            > memories from there including, weddings, and Hody, both of which I
                            > attended regularly during my visits to Slovakia.
                            >
                            > She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village
                            > and I watched many in the last few days. I just finished one which I
                            > attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:
                            >
                            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related
                            >
                            > Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and
                            > many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.
                            > Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler
                            > buildings.
                            >
                          • Barbara
                            I live here in Kentucky. Iam actually from Ceveland Ohio. I have a hammer dulcimer it looks and sounds so much like the cymbolim that you are talking about.
                            Message 13 of 16 , Sep 30, 2012
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                              I live here in Kentucky. Iam actually from Ceveland Ohio. I have a hammer dulcimer it looks and sounds so much like the cymbolim that you are talking about.


                              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Joe Armata <armata@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Oj Vilo, that schmaltzy music just melts my heart, it's so touching!
                              > It's easy to see why you love the area so much. Thanks for the link.
                              >
                              > Joe
                              >
                              >
                              > > She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village
                              > > and I watched many in the last few days. I just finished one which I
                              > > attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:
                              > >
                              > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related
                              > >
                              > > Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and
                              > > many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.
                              > > Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler
                              > > buildings.
                              > >
                              >
                            • William C. Wormuth
                              Barbara, The Dulcimer and Cimbalom are related.  There are Cimbalom instruments like the small Dulcimer which are carried in the Slavic countries.  Here is a
                              Message 14 of 16 , Sep 30, 2012
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                                Barbara,

                                The Dulcimer and Cimbalom are related.  There are Cimbalom instruments like the small Dulcimer which are carried in the Slavic countries. 
                                Here is a close look at the playing by the Moravian Group Hradistan:

                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48h7kzv-4nc

                                Z Bohom,

                                Vilo




                                ________________________________
                                From: Barbara <eternallysealed8@...>
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2012 9:08 AM
                                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Moravsko Slovacko


                                 
                                I live here in Kentucky. Iam actually from Ceveland Ohio. I have a hammer dulcimer it looks and sounds so much like the cymbolim that you are talking about.

                                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Joe Armata <armata@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Oj Vilo, that schmaltzy music just melts my heart, it's so touching!
                                > It's easy to see why you love the area so much. Thanks for the link.
                                >
                                > Joe
                                >
                                >
                                > > She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village
                                > > and I watched many in the last few days. I just finished one which I
                                > > attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:
                                > >
                                > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related
                                > >
                                > > Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and
                                > > many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.
                                > > Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler
                                > > buildings.
                                > >
                                >




                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • William C. Wormuth
                                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cimbalom
                                Message 15 of 16 , Sep 30, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cimbalom

                                  https://www.google.com/search?q=portable+Cimbalom&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=QJo&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=HM1oUIOrL-aK0QHX9IDwDw&ved=0CDUQsAQ&biw=1133&bih=438


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2012 6:50 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Moravsko Slovacko


                                  Barbara,

                                  The Dulcimer and Cimbalom are related.  There are Cimbalom instruments like the small Dulcimer which are carried in the Slavic countries. 
                                  Here is a close look at the playing by the Moravian Group Hradistan:

                                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48h7kzv-4nc

                                  Z Bohom,

                                  Vilo




                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Barbara <eternallysealed8@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2012 9:08 AM
                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Moravsko Slovacko


                                   
                                  I live here in Kentucky. Iam actually from Ceveland Ohio. I have a hammer dulcimer it looks and sounds so much like the cymbolim that you are talking about.

                                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Joe Armata <armata@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Oj Vilo, that schmaltzy music just melts my heart, it's so touching!
                                  > It's easy to see why you love the area so much. Thanks for the link.
                                  >
                                  > Joe
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > She advised me that there are many films on YouTube, from the village
                                  > > and I watched many in the last few days. I just finished one which I
                                  > > attach, (address), for your enjoyment.:
                                  > >
                                  > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0USl_k87vg&feature=related
                                  > >
                                  > > Moravian Slovaks have managed to preserve their folklore History and
                                  > > many Towns have regular Celebrations, dressing in their local Kroje.
                                  > > Many still paint Folk designs On the outside of Homes and Wine Celler
                                  > > buildings.
                                  > >
                                  >




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • William C. Wormuth
                                  Learn here how to make Slivovica, (Slovenske aj Moravske Svateho Vody). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLUly4N5t7M&feature=BFa&list=PL6322A972E09F914B&index=15
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Sep 30, 2012
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Learn here how to make Slivovica, (Slovenske aj Moravske Svateho Vody).

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLUly4N5t7M&feature=BFa&list=PL6322A972E09F914B&index=15


                                    Those of you who can understand the words, ENJOY for this is a beautiful Song.  I remember it from my times in Stani-Kvetna at weddings and Hody.  there is a still in Strani, used by all.

                                    S Panem Bohem.

                                    Vilko



                                    ________________________________

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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