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Passports in Slovakia

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  • Ron
    On this last trip to Slovakia I headed off on an extended hike without my passport, figuring that I was inside the EU and would not need it ... but upon
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 7, 2012
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      On this last trip to Slovakia I headed off on an extended hike without my passport, figuring that I was inside the EU and would not need it ... but upon checking into a hotel one night, I caused a bit of a fuss by not having it. The problem may have been taken care of by my paying cash and remaining "off the books". It is good to at least carry a copy of the passport. Mine was sitting behind at my cousin's house, and I had no copy or passport number with me.

      For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:

      http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
    • LongJohn Wayne
      WOW!  What a bigotted perspective.  LOL   ... but then again... it IS from the Atlantic. ________________________________ From: Ron To:
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 7, 2012
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        WOW!  What a bigotted perspective.  LOL
         
        ... but then again... it IS from the Atlantic.


        ________________________________
        From: Ron <amiak27@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 4:29 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Passports in Slovakia


         
        On this last trip to Slovakia I headed off on an extended hike without my passport, figuring that I was inside the EU and would not need it ... but upon checking into a hotel one night, I caused a bit of a fuss by not having it. The problem may have been taken care of by my paying cash and remaining "off the books". It is good to at least carry a copy of the passport. Mine was sitting behind at my cousin's house, and I had no copy or passport number with me.

        For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:

        http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... Most U.S. hotels ask for a guest s driver s license even if s/he pays cash in case any damage is discovered. Europe-wide, the only two recognized forms of
        Message 3 of 16 , Aug 7, 2012
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          > without my passport, figuring that I was inside the EU
          > and would not need it ... but upon checking into a hotel one night

          Most U.S. hotels ask for a guest's driver's license even if s/he pays cash in case any damage is discovered.

          Europe-wide, the only two recognized forms of ID are either the government-issued ID that each citizen receives by law at the age of 15 (obc~iansky preukaz in Slovak) or a passport. Only those two: unlike in the U.S., a driver's license is not usable for anything else than to drive in Europe.

          Additionally, the laws of the European countries require everyone to carry an officially recognized ID (one of the two mentioned above) at all times. I.e., an American may be fined or detained if a policeman stops him during whatever check and the American does not have his passport on him. Of course, the policeman may be lenient, but he will have the law behind him if he's not.


          Martin
        • Ron
          What specifics do you read as bigoted? Personally, s a native American I have always been baffled by our tipping system. But there are other points. I found
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 7, 2012
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            What specifics do you read as bigoted? Personally, s a native American I have always been baffled by our tipping system. But there are other points. I found it rather enlightening to read a foreign perspective.

            What is your point and perspective? Surely you can clarify three, if the article is bigoted.

            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> wrote:
            >
            > WOW!  What a bigotted perspective.  LOL
            >  
            > ... but then again... it IS from the Atlantic.
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Ron <amiak27@...>
            > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 4:29 PM
            > Subject: [Slovak-World] Passports in Slovakia
            >
            >
            >  
            > On this last trip to Slovakia I headed off on an extended hike without my passport, figuring that I was inside the EU and would not need it ... but upon checking into a hotel one night, I caused a bit of a fuss by not having it. The problem may have been taken care of by my paying cash and remaining "off the books". It is good to at least carry a copy of the passport. Mine was sitting behind at my cousin's house, and I had no copy or passport number with me.
            >
            > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
            >
            > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Ron
            If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 8, 2012
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              If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.

              In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.

              That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!

              Ron





              > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
              > >
              > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
              > >
              > >
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            • William C. Wormuth
              There are two Land Line 1. T-com 2. Orange and three Mobile 1. Orange 2. T-mobile 3. O2  Phone Companies Slovakia I you have T-com and try to call Orange, you
              Message 6 of 16 , Aug 8, 2012
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                There are two Land Line

                1. T-com
                2. Orange
                and three Mobile

                1. Orange
                2. T-mobile
                3. O2
                 Phone Companies Slovakia
                I you have T-com and try to call Orange, you are charged a fee. Same for vice-verse.


                More and more families have stopped using land lines and instead have mobil phones.

                Mobil Phones are for use, only within Slovak borders. If you plan to use a Phone while visiting Poland, Ukraine....etc., you need to purchase an "international service" from one of the companies.

                As in the USA, when driving you have to pay special attention to pedestrians texting while walking.

                WOW!  Some of us remember when there were very few Phones!

                We've come a long way Baby!

                D'akuje Boz~e,

                Vilo




                ________________________________
                From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia


                 
                If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.

                In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.

                That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!

                Ron

                > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                > >
                > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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                >




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ben Sorensen
                The quality of the calls here in the USA and in Slovakia on cell towers has now become comparable- before, there was truly a difference in the signal quality.
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 8, 2012
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                  The quality of the calls here in the USA and in Slovakia on cell towers has now become comparable- before, there was truly a difference in the signal quality.  However, the loudness of Americans on the cell phone versus the quietness of Slovaks on a cell is more cultural than its being an attempt at compensating for a lower quality product. I am not sure if this has really changed, but a mobile call in Slovakia was also very short (and sweet), while here in the US, people demanded unlimited minutes. There once was a time when texting (or SMS) was the standard communication in Slovakia and unheard of here. Now, American kids can rack up over 14,000 texts in a month--I know, I have charged people for that. :-)

                  I no longer, however, am associated with those phones. :-P
                  Ben


                  ________________________________
                  From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 9:23 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia


                   
                  There are two Land Line

                  1. T-com
                  2. Orange
                  and three Mobile

                  1. Orange
                  2. T-mobile
                  3. O2
                   Phone Companies Slovakia
                  I you have T-com and try to call Orange, you are charged a fee. Same for vice-verse.

                  More and more families have stopped using land lines and instead have mobil phones.

                  Mobil Phones are for use, only within Slovak borders. If you plan to use a Phone while visiting Poland, Ukraine....etc., you need to purchase an "international service" from one of the companies.

                  As in the USA, when driving you have to pay special attention to pedestrians texting while walking.

                  WOW!  Some of us remember when there were very few Phones!

                  We've come a long way Baby!

                  D'akuje Boz~e,

                  Vilo

                  ________________________________
                  From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia


                   
                  If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.

                  In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.

                  That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!

                  Ron

                  > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                  > >
                  > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
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                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Karen Kosky
                  Funny you say this.  I am a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.  We always laugh at how amazing it is that every other language is so much
                  Message 8 of 16 , Aug 8, 2012
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                    Funny you say this.  I am a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.  We always laugh at how amazing it is that every other language is so much louder than English! People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc sit in the middle of the car screaming away. I have only ever met one Slovak that I was not related to or was a family friend so I can only comment on the Slovaks in Slovakia who seemed pretty comparable to Americans.


                    ________________________________
                    From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                    Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia


                     
                    If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.

                    In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.

                    That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!

                    Ron

                    > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                    > >
                    > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ron
                    Thanks for a really different perspective, Karen. On the positive side it is nice to live in a country where people are comfortable speaking their mother
                    Message 9 of 16 , Aug 9, 2012
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                      Thanks for a really different perspective, Karen. On the positive side it is nice to live in a country where people are comfortable speaking their mother tongue. I do not know how many American Indians I have shocked with stories of how my mother was punished in school for speaking Slovak - just like the Indians when their languages were forbidden!

                      Ben, I wasn't serious about the technical inferiority of the US phone system, though that was quite true up until I returned to the US in 1997. Then we were always behind in technology and service, and even today I believe their cell service is cheaper than ours, including in Germany, where they have good incomes. The EU just ad companies lower rates for "international" calls within the EU. Oh, on costs, my Czech cousins tell me they go to Germany periodically to shop, since some German prices are lower than Czech prices!

                      Ron

                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Funny you say this.  I am a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.  We always laugh at how amazing it is that every other language is so much louder than English! People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc sit in the middle of the car screaming away. I have only ever met one Slovak that I was not related to or was a family friend so I can only comment on the Slovaks in Slovakia who seemed pretty comparable to Americans.
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.
                      >
                      > In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.
                      >
                      > That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!
                      >
                      > Ron
                      >
                      > > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                      > > >
                      > > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
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                    • Ben Sorensen
                      WHAT? I CAN T HEAR YOU!!!!!!!!!! ... Ben ________________________________ From: Ron To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, August
                      Message 10 of 16 , Aug 9, 2012
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                        WHAT? I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!!!!!!!
                        :-)
                        Ben


                        ________________________________
                        From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2012 2:03 PM
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Cell Phones in Slovakia


                         
                        Thanks for a really different perspective, Karen. On the positive side it is nice to live in a country where people are comfortable speaking their mother tongue. I do not know how many American Indians I have shocked with stories of how my mother was punished in school for speaking Slovak - just like the Indians when their languages were forbidden!

                        Ben, I wasn't serious about the technical inferiority of the US phone system, though that was quite true up until I returned to the US in 1997. Then we were always behind in technology and service, and even today I believe their cell service is cheaper than ours, including in Germany, where they have good incomes. The EU just ad companies lower rates for "international" calls within the EU. Oh, on costs, my Czech cousins tell me they go to Germany periodically to shop, since some German prices are lower than Czech prices!

                        Ron

                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Funny you say this.  I am a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.  We always laugh at how amazing it is that every other language is so much louder than English! People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc sit in the middle of the car screaming away. I have only ever met one Slovak that I was not related to or was a family friend so I can only comment on the Slovaks in Slovakia who seemed pretty comparable to Americans.
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        > If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.
                        >
                        > In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.
                        >
                        > That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!
                        >
                        > Ron
                        >
                        > > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                        > > >
                        > > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
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                        >




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • William C. Wormuth
                        HUH???????   WHAT????? ________________________________ From: Ben Sorensen To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 9, 2012
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                          HUH???????   WHAT?????



                          ________________________________
                          From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
                          To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2012 6:37 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Cell Phones in Slovakia


                           
                          WHAT? I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!!!!!!!
                          :-)
                          Ben

                          ________________________________
                          From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2012 2:03 PM
                          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Cell Phones in Slovakia


                           
                          Thanks for a really different perspective, Karen. On the positive side it is nice to live in a country where people are comfortable speaking their mother tongue. I do not know how many American Indians I have shocked with stories of how my mother was punished in school for speaking Slovak - just like the Indians when their languages were forbidden!

                          Ben, I wasn't serious about the technical inferiority of the US phone system, though that was quite true up until I returned to the US in 1997. Then we were always behind in technology and service, and even today I believe their cell service is cheaper than ours, including in Germany, where they have good incomes. The EU just ad companies lower rates for "international" calls within the EU. Oh, on costs, my Czech cousins tell me they go to Germany periodically to shop, since some German prices are lower than Czech prices!

                          Ron

                          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Funny you say this.  I am a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.  We always laugh at how amazing it is that every other language is so much louder than English! People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc sit in the middle of the car screaming away. I have only ever met one Slovak that I was not related to or was a family friend so I can only comment on the Slovaks in Slovakia who seemed pretty comparable to Americans.
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:27 PM
                          > Subject: [Slovak-World] Cell Phones in Slovakia
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > If I were to add an item for a tourist coming to America, it would be to expect a terribly deficient telephone system. My neighbor in the coffee shop just reminded me that we Americans have to shout into our cell phones to be heard at the other end.
                          >
                          > In Slovakia it is quite notable that people speak in soft tones with their cell phones, and seem to carry on successful conversations. In public areas, busses and shops I was often astounded to find out the neighbor was on the cell phone. They are very quiet and it is quite pleasant.
                          >
                          > That is a cultural aspect I sure wish we would pick up over here!
                          >
                          > Ron
                          >
                          > > > For anyone who has used a tourist guide book, you may appreciate the advice given to visitors to the USA:
                          > > >
                          > > > http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/06/welcome-to-america-please-be-on-time-what-guide-books-tell-foreign-visitors-to-the-us/257993/
                          > > >
                          > > >
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                          > >
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                        • votrubam
                          ... [...] ... The loud speakers above are not European. Among the Europeans, the Germans and Americans had a reputation of being loud tourists decades before
                          Message 12 of 16 , Aug 9, 2012
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                            > a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.
                            [...]
                            > People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep
                            > their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc

                            The loud speakers above are not European. Among the Europeans, the Germans and Americans had a reputation of being loud tourists decades before the advent of the cell phone. It may prove difficult, though, to sort out to what degree the loud/quiet mode of communication is a real distinction and to what degree perhaps a stereotype. The Germans are called loud even by the German-speaking Swiss.


                            Martin
                          • Karen Kosky
                            Just referring to the most common languages I hear. I do, however, find it amusing that Spanish is no longer considered a European language! In my travels,
                            Message 13 of 16 , Aug 9, 2012
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                              Just referring to the most common languages I hear. I do, however, find it amusing that Spanish is no longer considered a European language! In my travels, I've found Italians to be the loudest (and the line jumpers!) although I did have a terribly disturbing encounter with a customs guy in Dusseldorf. My Austrian stamp was so light he didn't see it and proceeded to scream his head off at me as to how I got there. I really thought I was going to be dragged off to a German prison. Can't say I have any desire to visit Dusseldorf!


                              ________________________________
                              From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, August 10, 2012 12:21 AM
                              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Cell Phones in Slovakia


                               
                              > a railroad conductor and see a good 5000 people a day.
                              [...]
                              > People speaking English generally go to the vestibule and keep
                              > their voices down while Spanish, Yiddish, Korean, Arabic etc

                              The loud speakers above are not European. Among the Europeans, the Germans and Americans had a reputation of being loud tourists decades before the advent of the cell phone. It may prove difficult, though, to sort out to what degree the loud/quiet mode of communication is a real distinction and to what degree perhaps a stereotype. The Germans are called loud even by the German-speaking Swiss.

                              Martin




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                            • Ron
                              With Spanish so common in the Americas it is hard to think of it as European, almost like American English has overwhelmed the original Island version. In 1988
                              Message 14 of 16 , Aug 10, 2012
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                                With Spanish so common in the Americas it is hard to think of it as European, almost like American English has overwhelmed the original Island version.

                                In 1988 I was working in Germany and we tried to chase down some German border guards to get a souvenir stamp in my visitor's passports. When we finally cornered a guard on the German-Danish border he chased us away, telling us not to bother him. We then had a good laugh with the friendly Danish guards. In 1997 when I was returning to the US when my contract expired, the fresh border guard at the airport demanded to know why I had no entry stamp in my passport... and I had to tell her that I could not explain why her government chose not to stamp the passport. She let me go.

                                Other than that my handling at EU borders has always been professional. Oh, shortly after the Czech-Slovak split I was heading from SK into CZ and the guard took my passport and directed me to a far corner to park and wait. As it was lunch time I started to deck out the hood of my car so I could picnic. It seemed that when the saw I was comfortably waiting they rushed out, handed my passport over, and chased me out.

                                Ron

                                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Just referring to the most common languages I hear. I do, however, find it amusing that Spanish is no longer considered a European language! In my travels, I've found Italians to be the loudest (and the line jumpers!) although I did have a terribly disturbing encounter with a customs guy in Dusseldorf. My Austrian stamp was so light he didn't see it and proceeded to scream his head off at me as to how I got there. I really thought I was going to be dragged off to a German prison. Can't say I have any desire to visit Dusseldorf!
                                >
                                >
                              • Karen Kosky
                                ... Too funny! I haven t had any other problems in the EU and, actually, I had the opposite experience when I had a layover in Berlin. We got off the plane and
                                Message 15 of 16 , Aug 10, 2012
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                                  > It seemed that when the saw I was comfortably waiting they rushed out, handed my passport over, and chased me out. 


                                  Too funny! I haven't had any other problems in the EU and, actually, I had the opposite experience when I had a layover in Berlin. We got off the plane and walked outside for some air. No one stopped us. I was a little amazed that we could have simply walked off with no one giving us a second look. You certainly couldn't do that here. (Or in Dusseldorf!)


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Friday, August 10, 2012 11:29 AM
                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Passports Stamping in Germany


                                   
                                  With Spanish so common in the Americas it is hard to think of it as European, almost like American English has overwhelmed the original Island version.

                                  In 1988 I was working in Germany and we tried to chase down some German border guards to get a souvenir stamp in my visitor's passports. When we finally cornered a guard on the German-Danish border he chased us away, telling us not to bother him. We then had a good laugh with the friendly Danish guards. In 1997 when I was returning to the US when my contract expired, the fresh border guard at the airport demanded to know why I had no entry stamp in my passport... and I had to tell her that I could not explain why her government chose not to stamp the passport. She let me go.

                                  Other than that my handling at EU borders has always been professional. Oh, shortly after the Czech-Slovak split I was heading from SK into CZ and the guard took my passport and directed me to a far corner to park and wait. As it was lunch time I started to deck out the hood of my car so I could picnic. It seemed that when the saw I was comfortably waiting they rushed out, handed my passport over, and chased me out.

                                  Ron

                                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Just referring to the most common languages I hear. I do, however, find it amusing that Spanish is no longer considered a European language! In my travels, I've found Italians to be the loudest (and the line jumpers!) although I did have a terribly disturbing encounter with a customs guy in Dusseldorf. My Austrian stamp was so light he didn't see it and proceeded to scream his head off at me as to how I got there. I really thought I was going to be dragged off to a German prison. Can't say I have any desire to visit Dusseldorf!
                                  >
                                  >




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                                • votrubam
                                  ... Words can often appear amusing with cursory reading. The comment spoke of loud _speakers_, not of the historical origin of their languages. Most native
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Aug 10, 2012
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                                    > I do, however, find it amusing that Spanish is no longer
                                    > considered a European language!

                                    Words can often appear amusing with cursory reading. The comment spoke of "loud _speakers_," not of the historical origin of their languages. Most native speakers of Spanish in the U.S. were not born in Europe, just like -- as Ron already pointed out -- most native speakers of English in the U.S. were not.


                                    > the loudness of Americans on the cell phone versus the
                                    > quietness of Slovaks on a cell

                                    An interesting observation, Ben. Without having considered it before, it indeed seems to be the case -- as if most Slovak callers were making quite sure that those around don't know what they're talking about, while you mostly know exactly what your neighbors are saying when the plane lands in the U.S.


                                    Martin
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