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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

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  • William C. Wormuth
    Larry, I believe he was from Radsovce, Zahorie. I have never published this site but it is very interesting:  http://www.travelatlas.sk/index.html Rados~ovce
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 9, 2012
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      Larry,

      I believe he was from Radsovce, Zahorie.

      I have never published this site but it is very interesting: 

      http://www.travelatlas.sk/index.html

      Rados~ovce , "Skalice"- lower left:http://www.travelatlas.sk/zahorie/zahorsh.html

      Z Bohom,

      Vilo



      ________________________________
      From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 9, 2012 4:17 AM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


       


      Vilo

       First; I disagree. Ben is very smart in his way, and your smart in your way....

      He's too young to be smarter than you. I'm sure Ben understands what I mean.

       About Hunkovic;  I have a naturalization record [intent] and it is spelled

       Stanli Hunkovic, born in Radosocz, Austria Hungary.

       I was going to upload it to the file section but I don't know how.

       I'll send it to you so you can see.

      Larry

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 11:37:02 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

      Larry,
      First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN.
      I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried "Honkovic" and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905 from Siary, Southern Poland.  The original manifest handwriting for Honkovic, the "o" looks like a "u".   There is a Ross Hunkovic, (on "Google"), Geneseo, NY.

      The Honkovic from Siary has a Slovak spelling, Polish would have been Honkovicz.

      Z Bohom,

      Vilo

      ________________________________
       From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
       

       

      Ben

       I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

       The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

       It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

       I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

      Larry

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

      :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

      Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

      Ben

      ________________________________
       From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
       

       
      > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

      A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

      > I am sure that there is a rule out there

      Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

      The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

      None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

      Martin

       

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