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Re: [Slovak-World] Nicknames

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  • Karen Kosky
    In my family, ka added to a name is something like we would use an ie or y. Slovak relatives call me Karenka. My mother Caroline is Carolka, my cousin Katarina
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 7, 2012
      In my family, ka added to a name is something like we would use an ie or y. Slovak relatives call me Karenka. My mother Caroline is Carolka, my cousin Katarina is Katka and older relatives refer to my grandmother Anna as Anitchka. I don't often hear male nicknames other than a cousin Juraj called Juro and I had an uncle Stanislaus who was called Shtana.

      Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • votrubam
      ... If used in Slovakia, it had to have ended in -o in Slovak. Unlike in some other Slavic languages (and unlike Slovak last names), Slovak men s first names
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 7, 2012
        > Stanislaus who was called Shtana.

        If used in Slovakia, it had to have ended in -o in Slovak. Unlike in some other Slavic languages (and unlike Slovak last names), Slovak men's first names and nicknames do not end in -a.

        Americans often want to spell the Slovak _a_ as _o_: halupki (which is based on the Slovak _holubky_), etc.


        Martin
      • Karen Kosky
        I was spelling phonetically. I don t know it was written as he passed many years ago and I only know stories and photos...he kinda looked like Kramer! Sent
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 7, 2012
          I was spelling phonetically. I don't know it was written as he passed many years ago and I only know stories and photos...he kinda looked like Kramer!


          Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • votrubam
          ... Indeed, and not quite. The last sound was like the -o- in hot (not like the -a- in hat), the first sound was -s- (not sh): Stano. ... Marika is a
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 7, 2012
            > I only know stories and photos
            > [...]
            > I was spelling phonetically.

            Indeed, and not quite. The last sound was like the -o- in hot (not like the -a- in hat), the first sound was -s- (not sh): Stano.


            > Marika, although I heard the latter used only
            > by my mom to refer to the Virgin Mary

            Marika is a Hungarian nickname for Maria, which is quite common in Slovakia (it also occurs in some South Slavic languages) and is often thought of as a separate name (e.g., the singer Marika Gombitova), but unlike Maria, Marika does not have its "name day" in the Slovak calendar.


            Martin
          • Ben Sorensen
            Helen, I discovered that too when around one monument at work (actually, an internship) Molly, Polly, and Mary are all used for one woman.  Maris~ka is an
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
              Helen, I discovered that too when around one monument at 'work' (actually, an internship) Molly, Polly, and Mary are all used for one woman. 

              Maris~ka is an interesting word; the verb 'hulit' is often found nearby. :-) It is not just Mary, but also marijuana. :-P 

              Let's see. in my family, we have:
              Benik
              Benisko
              Bendz~i
              Benus~ko

              Nikolko
              Nikus~ko
              Nikolasik
              Niki (NOT a Slovak derivation)
              (rarely) Nikolaj

              Emilia
              Mis~ka 
              Mis~a
              Mis~ulienka

              Adamec~ko
              Adamko

              As each of the boys have two middle names, the level of trouble they are in directly correlates with how many names we utter in anger.

              Ben



              ________________________________
              From: Helen Fedor <helenfedor@...>
              To: Slovak World <slovak-world@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 5:36 PM
              Subject: [Slovak-World] Nicknames


               

              Looking for a word in a slightly older Slovak-English dictionary (Konus~), I happened to spot the word "Marc~a," which is defined as 'Polly, Molly'. Marc~a was my mom's (Ma'ria) nickname. I had no idea that Polly and Molly were considered nicknames for Mary (I just verified this online).

              This led to another thought: what are the Slovak nicknames for Ma'ria (which had to have been the most common woman's name, along with Anna)? What nicknames do you have in your families, and from what general part of Slovakia do they come? In my own family (eastern Slovakia) I heard Marc~a and Marika, although I heard the latter used only by my mom to refer to the Virgin Mary, especially when I was a kid. My mom's nickname here, among our Slovak friends, was Mera, a back-formation from Mary, no doubt.

              Here's what Konus~ has:

              Mara -- Mary, Polly, Molly
              Marc~a -- Polly, Molly
              Marienka -- Mary, Polly
              Mari'na -- Mary
              Maris~(k)a -- Mary, Polly, Molly
              Marka -- Polly, Molly

              H


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ron
              ***happened to spot the word Marc~a, We have one Maria in the village called Marsha, by my ear, but that is the same ear that still occasionally hears
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                ***happened to spot the word "Marc~a,"

                We have one Maria in the village called Marsha, by my ear, but that is the same ear that still occasionally hears "gehma" in place of "ideme". I would swear I do not hear the _č_ but _sh_.

                Ron

                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:
                >
                > Helen, I discovered that too when around one monument at 'work' (actually, an internship) Molly, Polly, and Mary are all used for one woman. 
                >
                > Maris~ka is an interesting word; the verb 'hulit' is often found nearby. :-) It is not just Mary, but also marijuana. :-P 
                >
                > Let's see. in my family, we have:
                > Benik
                > Benisko
                > Bendz~i
                > Benus~ko
                >
                > Nikolko
                > Nikus~ko
                > Nikolasik
                > Niki (NOT a Slovak derivation)
                > (rarely) Nikolaj
                >
                > Emilia
                > Mis~ka 
                > Mis~a
                > Mis~ulienka
                >
                > Adamec~ko
                > Adamko
                >
                > As each of the boys have two middle names, the level of trouble they are in directly correlates with how many names we utter in anger.
                >
                > Ben
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Helen Fedor <helenfedor@...>
                > To: Slovak World <slovak-world@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Saturday, July 7, 2012 5:36 PM
                > Subject: [Slovak-World] Nicknames
                >
                >
                >  
                >
                > Looking for a word in a slightly older Slovak-English dictionary (Konus~), I happened to spot the word "Marc~a," which is defined as 'Polly, Molly'. Marc~a was my mom's (Ma'ria) nickname. I had no idea that Polly and Molly were considered nicknames for Mary (I just verified this online).
                >
                > This led to another thought: what are the Slovak nicknames for Ma'ria (which had to have been the most common woman's name, along with Anna)? What nicknames do you have in your families, and from what general part of Slovakia do they come? In my own family (eastern Slovakia) I heard Marc~a and Marika, although I heard the latter used only by my mom to refer to the Virgin Mary, especially when I was a kid. My mom's nickname here, among our Slovak friends, was Mera, a back-formation from Mary, no doubt.
                >
                > Here's what Konus~ has:
                >
                > Mara -- Mary, Polly, Molly
                > Marc~a -- Polly, Molly
                > Marienka -- Mary, Polly
                > Mari'na -- Mary
                > Maris~(k)a -- Mary, Polly, Molly
                > Marka -- Polly, Molly
                >
                > H
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Helen Fedor
                Is -i as an ending for feminine nicknames (and other feminine words) a borrowing from Hungarian? My people live SE of Kosice, about 25 miles from the
                Message 7 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                  Is "-i" as an ending for feminine nicknames (and other feminine words) a borrowing from Hungarian? My people live SE of Kosice, about 25 miles from the Hungarian border. I have a cousin Eva who I heard called either Evic~ka or Evi. I also remember hearing "mami" (mama + -i ?).
                  H

                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  From: votrubam@...
                  Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2012 04:54:40 +0000
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


























                  > I only know stories and photos

                  > [...]

                  > I was spelling phonetically.



                  Indeed, and not quite. The last sound was like the -o- in hot (not like the -a- in hat), the first sound was -s- (not sh): Stano.



                  > Marika, although I heard the latter used only

                  > by my mom to refer to the Virgin Mary



                  Marika is a Hungarian nickname for Maria, which is quite common in Slovakia (it also occurs in some South Slavic languages) and is often thought of as a separate name (e.g., the singer Marika Gombitova), but unlike Maria, Marika does not have its "name day" in the Slovak calendar.



                  Martin


















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Ben Sorensen
                  Sometimes, Helen. I have a cousin, Zuzana, whom we refer to as Zuzi or Zuzka. But my wife s nickname, Milka or Mis~a, cannot change to Mis~i (it would sound
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                    Sometimes, Helen.

                    I have a cousin, Zuzana, whom we refer to as Zuzi or Zuzka. But my wife's nickname, Milka or Mis~a, cannot change to Mis~i (it would sound like "mice"). Mami is normal as well, but this is usually a "spoken" phenomenon I find. There seems to just be a feel for when it works and when it doesn't.

                    I am sure that there is a rule out there, but I would leave that to our jazykovedec, Dr. Martin. After all, Chuck Norris prays to him. :-) (Martin's mind makes the speed of light wish it were faster!)

                    How would you translate jazykovedec to English, BTW? 

                    Ben


                    ________________________________
                    From: Helen Fedor <helenfedor@...>
                    To: Slovak World <slovak-world@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 11:07 AM
                    Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                    Is "-i" as an ending for feminine nicknames (and other feminine words) a borrowing from Hungarian?  My people live SE of Kosice, about 25 miles from the Hungarian border.  I have a cousin Eva who I heard called either Evic~ka or Evi.  I also remember hearing "mami" (mama + -i ?).
                    H

                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    From: votrubam@...
                    Date: Sun, 8 Jul 2012 04:54:40 +0000
                    Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname




















                     


                       
                         
                         
                          > I only know stories and photos

                    > [...]

                    > I was spelling phonetically.



                    Indeed, and not quite.  The last sound was like the -o- in hot (not like the -a- in hat), the first sound was -s- (not sh): Stano.



                    > Marika, although I heard the latter used only

                    > by my mom to refer to the Virgin Mary



                    Marika is a Hungarian nickname for Maria, which is quite common in Slovakia (it also occurs in some South Slavic languages) and is often thought of as a separate name (e.g., the singer Marika Gombitova), but unlike Maria, Marika does not have its "name day" in the Slovak calendar.



                    Martin





                       
                       

                       
                       






                                             

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                  • votrubam
                    ... A linguist. Jazykoveda = linguistics. ... Not a clear one, it s a kind of floating quasi-vocative (as Chuck Norris would surely put it). The -i with
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                      > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                      A linguist. Jazykoveda = linguistics.


                      > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                      Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it). The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address. It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?" The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                      The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too. E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                      None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some). It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.


                      Martin
                    • Ben Sorensen
                      ... Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                        :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                        Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                        Ben


                        ________________________________
                        From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                         
                        > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                        A linguist. Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                        > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                        Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it). The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address. It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?" The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                        The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too. E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                        None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some). It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                        Martin




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • lkocik@comcast.net
                        Ben  I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn t work.  The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.  It s of interest
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                          Ben

                           I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                           The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                           It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                           I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                          Larry


                          ----- Original Message -----


                          From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                          :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                          Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                          Ben


                          ________________________________
                           From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                           

                           
                          > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                          A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                          > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                          Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                          The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                          None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                          Martin


                           

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Eve Smith
                          My cousin Anna in northern Slovakia (who is currently residing in England) goes by Anicka. She recently walked 500 miles in two months after graduating from
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                            My cousin Anna in northern Slovakia (who is currently residing in England) goes by Anicka. She recently walked 500 miles in two months after graduating from college in England, a pilgrimage from France to Spain, Camino de Santiago! Her photos on the site looked like it was a beautiful walk. Ouch my feet!

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • William C. Wormuth
                            Larry, First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN. I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried Honkovic and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jul 8, 2012
                              Larry,
                              First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN.
                              I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried "Honkovic" and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905 from Siary, Southern Poland.  The original manifest handwriting for Honkovic, the "o" looks like a "u".   There is a Ross Hunkovic, (on "Google"), Geneseo, NY.

                              The Honkovic from Siary has a Slovak spelling, Polish would have been Honkovicz.


                              Z Bohom,

                              Vilo



                              ________________________________
                              From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                               


                              Ben

                               I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                               The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                               It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                               I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                              Larry

                              ----- Original Message -----

                              From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                              :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                              Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                              Ben

                              ________________________________
                               From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                               

                               
                              > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                              A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                              > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                              Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                              The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                              None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                              Martin

                               

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • lkocik@comcast.net
                              Vilo  First; I disagree. Ben is very smart in his way, and your smart in your way.... He s too young to be smarter than you. I m sure Ben understands what I
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jul 9, 2012
                                Vilo

                                 First; I disagree. Ben is very smart in his way, and your smart in your way....

                                He's too young to be smarter than you. I'm sure Ben understands what I mean.



                                 About Hunkovic;  I have a naturalization record [intent] and it is spelled

                                 Stanli Hunkovic, born in Radosocz, Austria Hungary.

                                 I was going to upload it to the file section but I don't know how.

                                 I'll send it to you so you can see.

                                Larry



                                ----- Original Message -----


                                From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 11:37:02 PM
                                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                Larry,
                                First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN.
                                I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried "Honkovic" and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905 from Siary, Southern Poland.  The original manifest handwriting for Honkovic, the "o" looks like a "u".   There is a Ross Hunkovic, (on "Google"), Geneseo, NY.

                                The Honkovic from Siary has a Slovak spelling, Polish would have been Honkovicz.


                                Z Bohom,

                                Vilo



                                ________________________________
                                 From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
                                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                 

                                 


                                Ben

                                 I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                                 The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                                 It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                                 I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                                Larry

                                ----- Original Message -----

                                From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                                Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                                Ben

                                ________________________________
                                 From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                 

                                 
                                > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                                A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                                > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                                Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                                The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                                None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                                Martin

                                 

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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Ben Sorensen
                                I am so sorry that I have not been able to touch this yet- but after work I am on it. :-) Hunkovic does not show up at all in 1995, but Hankovic does (mostly
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jul 9, 2012
                                  I am so sorry that I have not been able to touch this yet- but after work I am on it. :-)

                                  Hunkovic does not show up at all in 1995, but Hankovic does (mostly in the Banska Stiavnica area).  Spellings change over time; the Grady family of Duplin County, North Carolina, for just one example, has had their last name spelled as Graday, Graddy, Grady, and O'Grady. :-) I will get more info hopefully tonight. :-)
                                  Ben


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Monday, July 9, 2012 4:17 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                                   


                                  Vilo

                                   First; I disagree. Ben is very smart in his way, and your smart in your way....

                                  He's too young to be smarter than you. I'm sure Ben understands what I mean.

                                   About Hunkovic;  I have a naturalization record [intent] and it is spelled

                                   Stanli Hunkovic, born in Radosocz, Austria Hungary.

                                   I was going to upload it to the file section but I don't know how.

                                   I'll send it to you so you can see.

                                  Larry

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 11:37:02 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                  Larry,
                                  First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN.
                                  I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried "Honkovic" and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905 from Siary, Southern Poland.  The original manifest handwriting for Honkovic, the "o" looks like a "u".   There is a Ross Hunkovic, (on "Google"), Geneseo, NY.

                                  The Honkovic from Siary has a Slovak spelling, Polish would have been Honkovicz.

                                  Z Bohom,

                                  Vilo

                                  ________________________________
                                   From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                   

                                   

                                  Ben

                                   I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                                   The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                                   It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                                   I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                                  Larry

                                  ----- Original Message -----

                                  From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                  :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                                  Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                                  Ben

                                  ________________________________
                                   From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                   

                                   
                                  > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                                  A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                                  > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                                  Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                                  The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                                  None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                                  Martin

                                   

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                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Ben Sorensen
                                  Where is the document from? Is it American?  Stanislav is a normal name in Slovakia, and Stanley is NOT on the calendar. I think you have a transliteration of
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jul 9, 2012
                                    Where is the document from? Is it American? 

                                    Stanislav is a normal name in Slovakia, and Stanley is NOT on the calendar. I think you have a transliteration of a name here, personally. Spell it as it sounds!

                                    As far as the origin of Hunkovic, I will look deeper into that-- Martin would be another who would know perhaps immediately if this is more Southern Slavic than Slovak.
                                    Ben


                                    ________________________________
                                    From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                                     


                                    Ben

                                     I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                                     The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                                     It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                                     I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                                    Larry

                                    ----- Original Message -----

                                    From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                    :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                                    Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                                    Ben

                                    ________________________________
                                     From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                                    Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                     

                                     
                                    > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                                    A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                                    > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                                    Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                                    The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                                    None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                                    Martin

                                     

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • William C. Wormuth
                                    Larry, I believe he was from Radsovce, Zahorie. I have never published this site but it is very interesting:  http://www.travelatlas.sk/index.html Rados~ovce
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jul 9, 2012
                                      Larry,

                                      I believe he was from Radsovce, Zahorie.

                                      I have never published this site but it is very interesting: 

                                      http://www.travelatlas.sk/index.html

                                      Rados~ovce , "Skalice"- lower left:http://www.travelatlas.sk/zahorie/zahorsh.html

                                      Z Bohom,

                                      Vilo



                                      ________________________________
                                      From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Monday, July 9, 2012 4:17 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname


                                       


                                      Vilo

                                       First; I disagree. Ben is very smart in his way, and your smart in your way....

                                      He's too young to be smarter than you. I'm sure Ben understands what I mean.

                                       About Hunkovic;  I have a naturalization record [intent] and it is spelled

                                       Stanli Hunkovic, born in Radosocz, Austria Hungary.

                                       I was going to upload it to the file section but I don't know how.

                                       I'll send it to you so you can see.

                                      Larry

                                      ----- Original Message -----

                                      From: "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 11:37:02 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                      Larry,
                                      First, I SWEAR I AM NOT AS SMART AS BEN.
                                      I looked up Hunkovic on Ellis but had no luck.  I tried "Honkovic" and founf a Maryana who immigrated, 1905 from Siary, Southern Poland.  The original manifest handwriting for Honkovic, the "o" looks like a "u".   There is a Ross Hunkovic, (on "Google"), Geneseo, NY.

                                      The Honkovic from Siary has a Slovak spelling, Polish would have been Honkovicz.

                                      Z Bohom,

                                      Vilo

                                      ________________________________
                                       From: "lkocik@..." <lkocik@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 5:00 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                       

                                       

                                      Ben

                                       I attached a document but I might have to post it to the file page...I will if this doesn't work.

                                       The doc lists a Stanli Hunkovic.

                                       It's of interest because of the spelling of Stanli, with an "i".

                                       I also thought the name Hunkovic was interesting because of the derrogative nickname "Hunky". The name Hunkovic also seems to be  Croatian with the "ic" prefix....just my opinion.

                                      Larry

                                      ----- Original Message -----

                                      From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:37:26 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname

                                      :-) Actually, Chuck Norris proved his linguistic abilities in the Czech Republic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=qhaIsN2Ru7Y

                                      Seriously, I cannot thank you enough for the information you give us. I cannot believe that I could not make the connection between jazykovedec and linguist; being bilingual is almost a form of schizophrenia. 

                                      Ben

                                      ________________________________
                                       From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Sunday, July 8, 2012 12:40 PM
                                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Nickname
                                       

                                       
                                      > jazykovedec to English, BTW?

                                      A linguist.  Jazykoveda = linguistics.

                                      > I am sure that there is a rule out there

                                      Not a clear one, it's a kind of "floating quasi-vocative" (as Chuck Norris would surely put it).  The -i with women's first names and nicknames (as well as with "mother," etc.) typically occurs in direct address.  It's possible, but not that common to say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami said/arrived..." but some people will often say, e.g., "Zuzi/mami, where is the...?"  The -i is not from Hungarian, it happens in Czech, too, for instance.

                                      The tendency to modify first names in address occurs with men's names, too.  E.g., some people will often speak of someone as Joz~o, but when they address him, they will use the diminutive/endearment Joz~ko ("Joz~o said/arrived..."; "Hi, Joz~ko.")

                                      None of the above is a rule, regional or otherwise, some people do it more, some less or hardly ever (some of it may appear infantile to some).  It can happen in English, too, on occasion, but it's hardly detectable because there are so few name variations, e.g., "John said..." and "Johnny, come here." in reference to the same person.

                                      Martin

                                       

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