Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

Expand Messages
  • sichva@junction.net
    Thank you, Ron; I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I ve tried to discover more information about my grandparents -
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 2, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you, Ron;

      I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.

      Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.

      I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.

      Shelly Chvala



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ron
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display



      On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.

      The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

      This is what the exhibit signs had to say:

      "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
      Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend

      this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."

      2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.

      There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/




      No virus found in this message.
      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Shelly, Did you try here recently for help in finding info?  If not,  what are the names of your grandparents.  Were they married here?  For
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 2, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Shelly,

        Did you try here recently for help in finding info?  If not,  what are the names of your grandparents.  Were they married here? 


        For Hasprunka/Studienka [Haspruh-kah/Stuhdeehn-kah], I might be able to help as I have relatives near there. Siroke is in Eastern Slovakia and I am not as familiar but can still help many  now study English in Slovakia, today.


        Z Bohom,

        Vilo


        ________________________________
        From: "sichva@..." <sichva@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, July 2, 2012 2:16 PM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display


         
        Thank you, Ron;

        I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.

        Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.

        I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.

        Shelly Chvala

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ron
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

        On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.

        The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

        This is what the exhibit signs had to say:

        "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
        Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend

        this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."

        2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.

        There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

        No virus found in this message.
        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Katherine
        Hi Shelly, I hope you have a dictionary or a translator. I have been through Siroke which is a small but nice town. Most of the older people do not speak
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 3, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Shelly,
          I hope you have a dictionary or a translator. I have been through Siroke which is a small but nice town.
          Most of the older people do not speak English so look for some young kids that might help you. During
          the week most likely no one is at the church. Usually some one in the village has a key though and
          would let you in. Your best bet is to find the town municipal building and ask there. You can also ask
          at a local grocery store. If you are driving from the west you might go through the new tunnel which
          is very long but so much better that going the old way up the hill.
          Have a wonderful happy trip.
          Katherine in NJ

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: sichva@...
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, 02 Jul 2012 14:16:56 -0400 (EDT)
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display





          Thank you, Ron;

          I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.

          Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.

          I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.

          Shelly Chvala

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Ron
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

          On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.

          The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

          This is what the exhibit signs had to say:

          "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
          Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend

          this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."

          2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.

          There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

          No virus found in this message.
          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • sichva@junction.net
          Katherine; Great suggestions - I will check out the municipal building! and the new tunnel while I m there. Shelly :) ... From: Katherine To:
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 3, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Katherine;

            Great suggestions - I will check out the municipal building! and the new tunnel while I'm there.

            Shelly :)

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Katherine
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2012 3:58 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display



            Hi Shelly,
            I hope you have a dictionary or a translator. I have been through Siroke which is a small but nice town.
            Most of the older people do not speak English so look for some young kids that might help you. During
            the week most likely no one is at the church. Usually some one in the village has a key though and
            would let you in. Your best bet is to find the town municipal building and ask there. You can also ask
            at a local grocery store. If you are driving from the west you might go through the new tunnel which
            is very long but so much better that going the old way up the hill.
            Have a wonderful happy trip.
            Katherine in NJ

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: sichva@...
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, 02 Jul 2012 14:16:56 -0400 (EDT)
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

            Thank you, Ron;

            I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.

            Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.

            I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.

            Shelly Chvala

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ron
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
            Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

            On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.

            The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

            This is what the exhibit signs had to say:

            "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
            Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend

            this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."

            2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.

            There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

            No virus found in this message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            No virus found in this message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5106 - Release Date: 07/02/12


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • sichva@junction.net
            Vilo; I have just recently found Slovak World and have been enjoying the conversations. My grandfather, who was born in Hasprunka around 1884 (we think) was
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 3, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Vilo;

              I have just recently found "Slovak World" and have been enjoying the conversations.

              My grandfather, who was born in Hasprunka around 1884 (we think) was Paul (Pavel) Chvala. Various information gives his fathers name as either Vincent (?) or Pavel and his mothers name as Catherina or Katherine. He first met my grandmother in New York and they got married there a few years after she arrived in the USA.

              Shelly

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: William C. Wormuth
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 2:40 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display



              Shelly,

              Did you try here recently for help in finding info? If not, what are the names of your grandparents. Were they married here?

              For Hasprunka/Studienka [Haspruh-kah/Stuhdeehn-kah], I might be able to help as I have relatives near there. Siroke is in Eastern Slovakia and I am not as familiar but can still help many now study English in Slovakia, today.

              Z Bohom,

              Vilo

              ________________________________
              From: "sichva@..." <sichva@...>
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, July 2, 2012 2:16 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display



              Thank you, Ron;

              I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.

              Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.

              I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.

              Shelly Chvala

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Ron
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
              Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display

              On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.

              The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

              This is what the exhibit signs had to say:

              "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
              Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend

              this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."

              2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.

              There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5106 - Release Date: 07/02/12


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Carl
              Shelly, One of the things you should try to find relatives in Slovakia before your trip is to look on Facebook for your surnames. I know that sounds a little
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 4, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Shelly,
                One of the things you should try to find relatives in Slovakia before your trip is to look on Facebook for your surnames. I know that sounds a little crazy, but once when I was doing a Google search of my Kotlarčik surname, a listing came up for it on Facebook. So, I joined Facebook and contacted the individual. And we were indeed related. Now I have found 5 different families on Facebook, some who live in very small villages, that are related to me. I am in contact with all of them. So, then I looked for my mother's Slovak family the same way. Again, I was able to find several members in the town where my grandparents lived. Finally, I looked for a Serbian family with a very common surname. There were too many to contact so I looked for ones that came from my ancestor's village in Hercegovina and found several who I contacted. After struggling a bit with the language, I really hit pay dirt!. I found a member of my family who had a family tree with 126 members.....including my great-grandparents. From this tree, I was able to find about a dozen members of the family who now live all over the world (due to the war there in the 1990s). They have shared a lot of information about the family with me and were excited to find an American relative. One of the children, now living in Serbia is working in America this summer and will be visiting us this September. Pretty exciting.
                Anyway, give it a try.
                CK

                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, <sichva@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thank you, Ron;
                >
                > I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.
                >
                > Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.
                >
                > I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.
                >
                > Shelly Chvala
                >
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Ron
                > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
                > Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                >
                >
                >
                > On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.
                >
                > The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                >
                > This is what the exhibit signs had to say:
                >
                > "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
                > Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend
                >
                > this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."
                >
                > 2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.
                >
                > There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.
                >
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > No virus found in this message.
                > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                > Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • William C. Wormuth
                Carl, Good suggestion!  Additionally, Telephone books are good in finding relatives. Z Bohom, Vilo ________________________________ From: Carl
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 4, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Carl,
                  Good suggestion! 


                  Additionally, Telephone books are good in finding relatives.

                  Z Bohom,

                  Vilo



                  ________________________________
                  From: Carl <kotlarchik@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, July 4, 2012 9:49 AM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: 1870 Emigrant steerage display


                   
                  Shelly,
                  One of the things you should try to find relatives in Slovakia before your trip is to look on Facebook for your surnames. I know that sounds a little crazy, but once when I was doing a Google search of my Kotlarčik surname, a listing came up for it on Facebook. So, I joined Facebook and contacted the individual. And we were indeed related. Now I have found 5 different families on Facebook, some who live in very small villages, that are related to me. I am in contact with all of them. So, then I looked for my mother's Slovak family the same way. Again, I was able to find several members in the town where my grandparents lived. Finally, I looked for a Serbian family with a very common surname. There were too many to contact so I looked for ones that came from my ancestor's village in Hercegovina and found several who I contacted. After struggling a bit with the language, I really hit pay dirt!. I found a member of my family who had a family
                  tree with 126 members.....including my great-grandparents. From this tree, I was able to find about a dozen members of the family who now live all over the world (due to the war there in the 1990s). They have shared a lot of information about the family with me and were excited to find an American relative. One of the children, now living in Serbia is working in America this summer and will be visiting us this September. Pretty exciting.
                  Anyway, give it a try.
                  CK

                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, <sichva@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thank you, Ron;
                  >
                  > I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.
                  >
                  > Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.
                  >
                  > I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.
                  >
                  > Shelly Chvala
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Ron
                  > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
                  > Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.
                  >
                  > The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                  >
                  > This is what the exhibit signs had to say:
                  >
                  > "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
                  > Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend
                  >
                  > this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."
                  >
                  > 2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.
                  >
                  > There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.
                  >
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > No virus found in this message.
                  > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  > Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Carl
                  One more thing that I forgot to mention. Also, search on the feminine version of your surname on Facebook. I had much more luck using the Kotlarčiková
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 4, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    One more thing that I forgot to mention. Also, search on the feminine version of your surname on Facebook. I had much more luck using the Kotlarčiková version! And thanks Vilo.

                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Carl,
                    > Good suggestion! 
                    >
                    >
                    > Additionally, Telephone books are good in finding relatives.
                    >
                    > Z Bohom,
                    >
                    > Vilo
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Carl <kotlarchik@...>
                    > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Wednesday, July 4, 2012 9:49 AM
                    > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > Shelly,
                    > One of the things you should try to find relatives in Slovakia before your trip is to look on Facebook for your surnames. I know that sounds a little crazy, but once when I was doing a Google search of my Kotlarčik surname, a listing came up for it on Facebook. So, I joined Facebook and contacted the individual. And we were indeed related. Now I have found 5 different families on Facebook, some who live in very small villages, that are related to me. I am in contact with all of them. So, then I looked for my mother's Slovak family the same way. Again, I was able to find several members in the town where my grandparents lived. Finally, I looked for a Serbian family with a very common surname. There were too many to contact so I looked for ones that came from my ancestor's village in Hercegovina and found several who I contacted. After struggling a bit with the language, I really hit pay dirt!. I found a member of my family who had a family
                    > tree with 126 members.....including my great-grandparents. From this tree, I was able to find about a dozen members of the family who now live all over the world (due to the war there in the 1990s). They have shared a lot of information about the family with me and were excited to find an American relative. One of the children, now living in Serbia is working in America this summer and will be visiting us this September. Pretty exciting.
                    > Anyway, give it a try.
                    > CK
                    >
                    > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, <sichva@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Thank you, Ron;
                    > >
                    > > I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.
                    > >
                    > > Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.
                    > >
                    > > I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.
                    > >
                    > > Shelly Chvala
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: Ron
                    > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
                    > > Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.
                    > >
                    > > The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                    > >
                    > > This is what the exhibit signs had to say:
                    > >
                    > > "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
                    > > Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend
                    > >
                    > > this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."
                    > >
                    > > 2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.
                    > >
                    > > There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.
                    > >
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > No virus found in this message.
                    > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    > > Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • sichva@junction.net
                    Great ideas Carl Thank you. Shelly ... From: Carl To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2012 8:36 AM Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: 1870
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 4, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Great ideas Carl

                      Thank you.

                      Shelly

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Carl
                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2012 8:36 AM
                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: 1870 Emigrant steerage display



                      One more thing that I forgot to mention. Also, search on the feminine version of your surname on Facebook. I had much more luck using the Kotlarčiková version! And thanks Vilo.

                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Carl,
                      > Good suggestion!Â
                      >
                      >
                      > Additionally, Telephone books are good in finding relatives.
                      >
                      > Z Bohom,
                      >
                      > Vilo
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Carl <kotlarchik@...>
                      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, July 4, 2012 9:49 AM
                      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                      >
                      >
                      > Â
                      > Shelly,
                      > One of the things you should try to find relatives in Slovakia before your trip is to look on Facebook for your surnames. I know that sounds a little crazy, but once when I was doing a Google search of my Kotlarčik surname, a listing came up for it on Facebook. So, I joined Facebook and contacted the individual. And we were indeed related. Now I have found 5 different families on Facebook, some who live in very small villages, that are related to me. I am in contact with all of them. So, then I looked for my mother's Slovak family the same way. Again, I was able to find several members in the town where my grandparents lived. Finally, I looked for a Serbian family with a very common surname. There were too many to contact so I looked for ones that came from my ancestor's village in Hercegovina and found several who I contacted. After struggling a bit with the language, I really hit pay dirt!. I found a member of my family who had a family
                      > tree with 126 members.....including my great-grandparents. From this tree, I was able to find about a dozen members of the family who now live all over the world (due to the war there in the 1990s). They have shared a lot of information about the family with me and were excited to find an American relative. One of the children, now living in Serbia is working in America this summer and will be visiting us this September. Pretty exciting.
                      > Anyway, give it a try.
                      > CK
                      >
                      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, <sichva@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thank you, Ron;
                      > >
                      > > I am about to embark on my first trip to the Slovak Republic. In preparation I've tried to discover more information about my grandparents - who were both from rural Slovakia (Hasprunka/Studienka and Siroke). They came to North America between 1890 and 1900, and I know very little about their voyage or for that matter what their lives were like prior to their departure. So these pictures, Ron, gave me a little insight into their experience. Thanks.
                      > >
                      > > Unfortunately, my grandparents did not pass on much information about their lives in Slovakia (what would it have been known as in 1890 - Hungary?) to my father and he didn't ask for more than they offered. So we know little of relatives that are here in North America and nothing of relatives that may still be living in their original communities.
                      > >
                      > > I do not speak Slovakian, only English, and wondered if I travelled to these small communities if I would be able to get by with just English - in trying to find relatives. Is the church a good place to start looking or what would you suggest.... Being new to all of this I am open to ideas.
                      > >
                      > > Shelly Chvala
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: Ron
                      > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 11:09 PM
                      > > Subject: [Slovak-World] 1870 Emigrant steerage display
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > On my way back to the Frankfurt airport and my flight back to Alaska on the 3rd of July I headed to Munich and spent a day at the Deutsches Museum, a well respected museum of sciences and technology that can be compared to the Smithsonian in Washington. It is recommended for anyone with an interest in the breadth of human knowledge and development.
                      > >
                      > > The section on shipping includes a display on immigration, and as most of you know many of our ancestors exited Europe through German ports between 1880 and 1914. With the cooperation of the German ship lines they have displays of a first class cabins as well as a third class or steerage class display representing the conditions on a sailing ship. I took a few photos that I will post in the FILES section of this forum.
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                      > >
                      > > This is what the exhibit signs had to say:
                      > >
                      > > "Between Decks of an Emigrant Sailing Ship, about 1870, Replica
                      > > Poverty and political persecution caused about 14 million Europeans, in some cases with their families, to go to North America between 1850 and 1914. The journey could take between 4 weeks and four months; hundreds f people had to spend
                      > >
                      > > this time tween-decks. Lack of care and atrocious hygienic conditions led to epidemics on board. In 1853 every tenth emigrant died on board. Passengers had to provide their own food, crockery, mattresses and bedding. They formed cooking groups and elected a member who distributed the food rations which were then prepared and cooked by the women. Emigrant transports were an important export item; shipping companies employed persons to recruit passengers. National and economic interests thus led to reforms which required by law minimum dimensions of 2.85 cubic meters per passenger and also stipulated the extent of sanitation and life saving equipment to be provided."
                      > >
                      > > 2.85 cubic meters is 101 cubic feet, or in a deck 6 feet high, equivalent to floor space of 4x4.
                      > >
                      > > There was no display on steerage in later sailing ships. Looking at the pictures, the generous space depicted does not seem to reconcile with the space calculated.
                      > >
                      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/files/1870%20steerage%20display/
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > No virus found in this message.
                      > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      > > Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5095 - Release Date: 06/26/12
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >




                      No virus found in this message.
                      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      Version: 2012.0.2180 / Virus Database: 2437/5106 - Release Date: 07/02/12


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.