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modern funeral practices in Slovakia?

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  • Julie Michutka
    Could someone tell me what the modern funeral practices are in Slovakia? The reason I ask--in an upcoming conversation (very soon, and in English) with a
    Message 1 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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      Could someone tell me what the modern funeral practices are in Slovakia? The reason I ask--in an upcoming conversation (very soon, and in English) with a Slovak I need to refer to modern American funeral (well, post-death) practices such as wake (including location at a funeral home, and implications of not having a wake), funeral homes and the services they provide, common length of time between death and funeral/burial, etc. I don't know what practices I should assume we have in common, and which I should add an explanation for right off the bat.

      I really am looking for firm knowledge, not anecdotes (even tho' I ordinarily love anecdotes).

      Thanks for any insight!

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@...
    • Ben Sorensen
      Julie,  There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also
      Message 2 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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        Julie, 
        There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."

        In Hozelec, I was (un)fortunate to attend only one funeral. Everyone wore black and proceeded to the Dom smutku when the bells rang (though the time was already agreed upon). After the bells, then some melancholy music was played on the loudspeakers, as we kept proceeding to the Dom. There, a short wake took place, and then the body was moved (by pallbearers, much like a Masonic funeral would have) to the cemetery where each person, after a short sermon, then took a clod of dirt and cast it into the grave after the body was lowered. 

        Now the caveat: the person had joined what I would call a sect. The sermon was completely unprofessional and degrading to Vladko's memory; I had the impression that they did not believe that any honor should be given mortal remains or remembrances. Only the soul of the deceased was worthy of honor, and that was given him directly on his arrival to the Kingdom of Heaven. Not one Catholic, Lutheran, or Orthodox (I was the only one) thought that this funeral was correctly done and worthy of his memory. (I actually wanted to slug the "preacher man," and when he asked me what I thought I just walked away as his "performance" sickened me). I feel pretty confident that the pall bearers and the communal casting of the clods are traditional, but I fear saying how widespread these practices are. Most every village has a "dom smutku," however; in every village that I spent more than one day in, I heard the music and the bells. I was fortunate that I did not have
        to attend these funerals. :-) Does that help?

        Ben

        ________________________________
        From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 12:47 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


         
        Could someone tell me what the modern funeral practices are in Slovakia? The reason I ask--in an upcoming conversation (very soon, and in English) with a Slovak I need to refer to modern American funeral (well, post-death) practices such as wake (including location at a funeral home, and implications of not having a wake), funeral homes and the services they provide, common length of time between death and funeral/burial, etc. I don't know what practices I should assume we have in common, and which I should add an explanation for right off the bat.

        I really am looking for firm knowledge, not anecdotes (even tho' I ordinarily love anecdotes).

        Thanks for any insight!

        Julie Michutka
        jmm@...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Julie Michutka
        Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful. This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I ve seen people
        Message 3 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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          Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful.

          This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I've seen people walking through the village to the church for a funeral (each person in black, most of the women carrying a flower), and a couple of times in larger towns I've seen funeral processions from the church to (I presume) the cemetery. I was struck by this; we do our traveling to and from the church and cemetery by car, and I think we miss a certain part of the ritual and process that way. I'll admit that I'm a very process-oriented person; anyway, the walking to/from (esp with others) seemed a more physical way to participate in all that a funeral and burial entails.

          Julie


          On Jun 29, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

          > Julie,
          > There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."
        • Ben Sorensen
          I would agree, and I think the music and the tolling of the bells also set the atmosphere, and the throwing of the dirt also gets people personally involved in
          Message 4 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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            I would agree, and I think the music and the tolling of the bells also set the atmosphere, and the throwing of the dirt also gets people personally involved in the "remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return" on a personal level as well. We in America do not seem to get as involved with death as Slovaks do.
            Ben


            ________________________________
            From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 8:06 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


             
            Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful.

            This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I've seen people walking through the village to the church for a funeral (each person in black, most of the women carrying a flower), and a couple of times in larger towns I've seen funeral processions from the church to (I presume) the cemetery. I was struck by this; we do our traveling to and from the church and cemetery by car, and I think we miss a certain part of the ritual and process that way. I'll admit that I'm a very process-oriented person; anyway, the walking to/from (esp with others) seemed a more physical way to participate in all that a funeral and burial entails.

            Julie

            On Jun 29, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

            > Julie,
            > There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Julie Michutka
            My husband s family buries their own. If they are too old or weak, or it s just too hot, then the cemetery guys (waiting in the background) start shoveling
            Message 5 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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              My husband's family buries their own. If they are too old or weak, or it's just too hot, then the cemetery guys (waiting in the background) start shoveling too, but we stay until the grave is closed. It's so sad, and I hate the sound of the earth hitting the casket, but I like the process. We tried to do that for my father's burial, but the weather was so horrific we had to leave the cemetery immediately after the prayers and a song (we even asked funeral attendees to go straight to the luncheon and not even try to come to the cemetery)--my husband, bless him, stayed behind anyway so that there was someone to witness the complete burial.

              Yes, most Americans are removed from the processes of death.

              Julie

              On Jun 29, 2012, at 8:18 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

              > I would agree, and I think the music and the tolling of the bells also set the atmosphere, and the throwing of the dirt also gets people personally involved in the "remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return" on a personal level as well. We in America do not seem to get as involved with death as Slovaks do.
              > Ben
              >
            • William C. Wormuth
              Funeral in Kúty: Family members are responsible for preparation of the body.  They wash, dress and put it in the casket.  The body is them taken to the
              Message 6 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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                Funeral in Kúty:


                Family members are responsible for preparation of the body.  They wash, dress and put it in the casket.  The body is them taken to the front of the church where it is blessed by the priest then to the Dom Smutku, (Pohrebny Dom) and put it into a cooler.  ( in these modern times, where close family may be as far as England, the funeral may not take place for 4 or 5 days.)

                Americans would be amazed to see a cold undecorated body.  Once they do, they know what death is.


                The funeral Mass is celebrated before or after the burial.


                Family and friends attend the funeral there with the priest providing the ritual. Before the service, people line up to view, kiss and sprinkle the body with holy water with a sprig of rosemary.  The casket is then nailed shut and moved to a Dias in a larger room where the funeral service is performed. Following, all walk to the cemetary, (directly next to the Dom Smutku, for burial. The body being carried by 6 men.  

                Z Bohom,

                Vilo



                ________________________________
                From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 8:06 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


                 
                Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful.

                This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I've seen people walking through the village to the church for a funeral (each person in black, most of the women carrying a flower), and a couple of times in larger towns I've seen funeral processions from the church to (I presume) the cemetery. I was struck by this; we do our traveling to and from the church and cemetery by car, and I think we miss a certain part of the ritual and process that way. I'll admit that I'm a very process-oriented person; anyway, the walking to/from (esp with others) seemed a more physical way to participate in all that a funeral and burial entails.

                Julie

                On Jun 29, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

                > Julie,
                > There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Julie Michutka
                Thank you kindly for this description, Vilo. This is very helpful. --Julie Michutka
                Message 7 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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                  Thank you kindly for this description, Vilo. This is very helpful.

                  --Julie Michutka

                  On Jun 29, 2012, at 8:55 PM, William C. Wormuth wrote:
                  >
                  > Family members are responsible for preparation of the body. They wash, dress and put it in the casket. The body is them taken to the front of the church where it is blessed by the priest then to the Dom Smutku, (Pohrebny Dom) and put it into a cooler. ( in these modern times, where close family may be as far as England, the funeral may not take place for 4 or 5 days.)
                  >
                  > Americans would be amazed to see a cold undecorated body. Once they do, they know what death is.
                  >
                  >
                  > The funeral Mass is celebrated before or after the burial.
                  >
                  >
                  > Family and friends attend the funeral there with the priest providing the ritual. Before the service, people line up to view, kiss and sprinkle the body with holy water with a sprig of rosemary. The casket is then nailed shut and moved to a Dias in a larger room where the funeral service is performed. Following, all walk to the cemetary, (directly next to the Dom Smutku, for burial. The body being carried by 6 men.
                  >
                  > Z Bohom,
                  >
                  > Vilo
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                  > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 8:06 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful.
                  >
                  > This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I've seen people walking through the village to the church for a funeral (each person in black, most of the women carrying a flower), and a couple of times in larger towns I've seen funeral processions from the church to (I presume) the cemetery. I was struck by this; we do our traveling to and from the church and cemetery by car, and I think we miss a certain part of the ritual and process that way. I'll admit that I'm a very process-oriented person; anyway, the walking to/from (esp with others) seemed a more physical way to participate in all that a funeral and burial entails.
                  >
                  > Julie
                  >
                  > On Jun 29, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:
                  >
                  >> Julie,
                  >> There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Ron
                  Sprinkling of the dirt on the casket by each attendee I have participated in at a funeral in Germany. In this case they used sand and a trowel for each person.
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jun 29, 2012
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                    Sprinkling of the dirt on the casket by each attendee I have participated in at a funeral in Germany. In this case they used sand and a trowel for each person.

                    Do they still photograph the dead person in the coffin? That was a practice among immigrants in the first half of the 1900's, and I was sent a photo of a cousin in his coffin about 20 years ago as a remembrance.

                    My aunt died shortly after my visit a few weeks ago, but I was already traveling elsewhere. She died Friday morning and the funeral was held in the village at 4PM Monday. I wish I had been at the funeral for the goodbye and to meet other family.


                    Ron

                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thank you kindly for this description, Vilo. This is very helpful.
                    >
                    > --Julie Michutka
                    >
                    > On Jun 29, 2012, at 8:55 PM, William C. Wormuth wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Family members are responsible for preparation of the body. They wash, dress and put it in the casket. The body is them taken to the front of the church where it is blessed by the priest then to the Dom Smutku, (Pohrebny Dom) and put it into a cooler. ( in these modern times, where close family may be as far as England, the funeral may not take place for 4 or 5 days.)
                    > >
                    > > Americans would be amazed to see a cold undecorated body. Once they do, they know what death is.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > The funeral Mass is celebrated before or after the burial.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Family and friends attend the funeral there with the priest providing the ritual. Before the service, people line up to view, kiss and sprinkle the body with holy water with a sprig of rosemary. The casket is then nailed shut and moved to a Dias in a larger room where the funeral service is performed. Following, all walk to the cemetary, (directly next to the Dom Smutku, for burial. The body being carried by 6 men.
                    > >
                    > > Z Bohom,
                    > >
                    > > Vilo
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ________________________________
                    > > From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                    > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 8:06 PM
                    > > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thank you, Ben. I was unaware of the Dom smutku. Knowing about that is helpful.
                    > >
                    > > This is tangential to my request for information: on my trips, I've seen people walking through the village to the church for a funeral (each person in black, most of the women carrying a flower), and a couple of times in larger towns I've seen funeral processions from the church to (I presume) the cemetery. I was struck by this; we do our traveling to and from the church and cemetery by car, and I think we miss a certain part of the ritual and process that way. I'll admit that I'm a very process-oriented person; anyway, the walking to/from (esp with others) seemed a more physical way to participate in all that a funeral and burial entails.
                    > >
                    > > Julie
                    > >
                    > > On Jun 29, 2012, at 7:43 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:
                    > >
                    > >> Julie,
                    > >> There are many differences between our funerals and Slovak funerals, and there are differences in Slovakia between towns and villages (and also differences among villages). I am afraid that speaking of Slovak funerals would be misleading; they are so varied that we would tread on thin ice if we said "this is how it is done."
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • votrubam
                    ... A key caution by Ben. Some of the practices described in posts would seem outlandish (home washing) or not what we d consider doing (processions) to
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                      > there are differences in Slovakia between
                      > towns and villages (and also...

                      A key caution by Ben. Some of the practices described in posts would seem outlandish (home washing) or "not what we'd consider doing" (processions) to some other Slovaks. No statistics that I know of, but probably most if not all Slovak urban funerals have been handled by funeral homes for decades (while but a minority of the Slovaks live in dediny, agricultural communities, where most of the active SK-Worlders' relatives appear to live or at least whose customs tend to be mainly discussed on SK-W).

                      One related, pan-Slovak, and potentially embarrassing transatlantic difference: the Slovaks never give presents to the bereaved. The U.S. custom is completely unknown and would appear quite inappropriate and offensive in Slovak cultural context ("Are you deranged? My [near one] died and [the material object you're giving me] is supposed to make up for that, console me?").


                      Martin
                    • Julie Michutka
                      Thank you, Martin, this too is very helpful! Julie Michutka jmm@pathbridge.net
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                        Thank you, Martin, this too is very helpful!

                        Julie Michutka
                        jmm@...

                        On Jun 30, 2012, at 4:34 AM, votrubam wrote:

                        >> there are differences in Slovakia between
                        >> towns and villages (and also...
                        >
                        > A key caution by Ben. Some of the practices described in posts would seem outlandish (home washing) or "not what we'd consider doing" (processions) to some other Slovaks. No statistics that I know of, but probably most if not all Slovak urban funerals have been handled by funeral homes for decades (while but a minority of the Slovaks live in dediny, agricultural communities, where most of the active SK-Worlders' relatives appear to live or at least whose customs tend to be mainly discussed on SK-W).
                        >
                        > One related, pan-Slovak, and potentially embarrassing transatlantic difference: the Slovaks never give presents to the bereaved. The U.S. custom is completely unknown and would appear quite inappropriate and offensive in Slovak cultural context ("Are you deranged? My [near one] died and [the material object you're giving me] is supposed to make up for that, console me?").
                        >
                        >
                        > Martin
                        >
                      • Ben Sorensen
                        I think Americans just like presents. :-P  Actually, even here in the states, I have never seen that! So even here, just like in Slovakia, the traditions vary
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                          I think Americans just like presents. :-P 

                          Actually, even here in the states, I have never seen that! So even here, just like in Slovakia, the traditions vary around funerals. Custom and tradition is very hard to pinpoint at a "national" level in any case. Hozelec is close to Poprad, so it mixes both city and village traditions. Bratislava will be very different as will Presov; Humenne also probably has their own take. 

                          In Hozelec, we make pirogies (pirohy) by hand, using a mashed potato and bryndza mix. This is a luxury in Ocova, where the pirogies are filled with jelly. Jelly-filled pirogies were an oddity in Hozelec. 

                          :-)
                          Ben


                          ________________________________
                          From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2012 2:14 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


                           
                          Thank you, Martin, this too is very helpful!

                          Julie Michutka
                          jmm@...

                          On Jun 30, 2012, at 4:34 AM, votrubam wrote:

                          >> there are differences in Slovakia between
                          >> towns and villages (and also...
                          >
                          > A key caution by Ben. Some of the practices described in posts would seem outlandish (home washing) or "not what we'd consider doing" (processions) to some other Slovaks. No statistics that I know of, but probably most if not all Slovak urban funerals have been handled by funeral homes for decades (while but a minority of the Slovaks live in dediny, agricultural communities, where most of the active SK-Worlders' relatives appear to live or at least whose customs tend to be mainly discussed on SK-W).
                          >
                          > One related, pan-Slovak, and potentially embarrassing transatlantic difference: the Slovaks never give presents to the bereaved. The U.S. custom is completely unknown and would appear quite inappropriate and offensive in Slovak cultural context ("Are you deranged? My [near one] died and [the material object you're giving me] is supposed to make up for that, console me?").
                          >
                          >
                          > Martin
                          >




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Julie Michutka
                          ... I ve only seen money gifts (and of course, flowers and food), and I haven t really seen it in the place and culture I live in now. I ve seen the money
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                            On Jun 30, 2012, at 2:23 PM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

                            > I think Americans just like presents. :-P
                            >
                            > Actually, even here in the states, I have never seen that!

                            I've only seen money gifts (and of course, flowers and food), and I haven't really seen it in the place and culture I live in now. I've seen the money gifts specified for Masses (because, you know, the grieving family needs to play bookkeeper??), or just the implication that it's for the family as a recognition of the loss of a breadwinner and/or the sudden and unexpected burden of funeral expenses.

                            Julie Michutka
                            jmm@...
                          • Karen Kosky
                            I ve never heard of presents given. That sounds like something out of a movie. The only money ever given is to a charity specified by the family in lieu of
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                              I've never heard of presents given. That sounds like something out of a movie. The only money ever given is to a charity specified by the family in lieu of flowers. I'd be horrified if someone gave me money over the death of a family member.

                              Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • votrubam
                              ... Which underscores Ben s caution about assumptions of national customs (funeral or otherwise). Let me mention a gift of a box of pricey citrus fruits to a
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                                > I've never heard of presents given.

                                Which underscores Ben's caution about assumptions of "national" customs (funeral or otherwise).

                                Let me mention a gift of a box of pricey citrus fruits to a Slovak by an American on the occasion of the Slovak's father's death that I'm familiar with. The American was then described as "an idiot" by the Slovak not familiar with the U.S. (perhaps limited) custom. And a query I fielded from a highly placed American executive of a U.S.--international company with a significant exposure in Slovakia (paraphrasing): "A dear Slovak friend's mother has just passed away. The [female] friend will drop by for a visit next week, what would be an appropriate present to give her on this occasion?" The following discussion confirmed that the American did intend to give her a present on the occasion of and because of her mother's death, not just a "friendship" present that the executive hoped would merely happen to work under the circumstances.


                                Martin
                              • Ben Sorensen
                                No Karen, it happens. . . oddly enough.  Ben ________________________________ From: Karen Kosky To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                                  No Karen, it happens. . . oddly enough. 
                                  Ben


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...>
                                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2012 2:59 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


                                   

                                  I've never heard of presents given. That sounds like something out of a movie. The only money ever given is to a charity specified by the family in lieu of flowers. I'd be horrified if someone gave me money over the death of a family member.

                                  Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Caye Caswick
                                  There are envelopes at most wakes (here in Chicago and the Midwest) to make a donation to the family -- or to a charity -- and mass cards are a biggie here
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                                    There are envelopes at most wakes (here in Chicago and the Midwest) to make a donation to the family -- or to a charity -- and mass cards are a biggie here too.


                                    Caye




                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
                                    To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2012 2:57 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


                                     
                                    No Karen, it happens. . . oddly enough. 
                                    Ben

                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...>
                                    To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2012 2:59 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] modern funeral practices in Slovakia?


                                     

                                    I've never heard of presents given. That sounds like something out of a movie. The only money ever given is to a charity specified by the family in lieu of flowers. I'd be horrified if someone gave me money over the death of a family member.

                                    Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Karen Kosky
                                    I wouldn t profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jun 30, 2012
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                                      I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.

                                      On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.

                                      Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Bobbi J. Town
                                      From: Bobbi (Masaryk) Town barbaraj10@cox.net To: Slovak-World@ Yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2012 I m with you, Karen. I live in Phoenix,
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jul 1, 2012
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                                        From: Bobbi (Masaryk) Town barbaraj10@...
                                        To: Slovak-World@ Yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2012


                                        I'm with you, Karen. I live in Phoenix, Arizona , previously Redondo Beach California, and have never heard of funeral gifts either. Unless the original
                                        writer meant taking food, or flowers which could be construed as gifts.........?????

                                        Bobbi


                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: Karen Kosky
                                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2012 4:01 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?




                                        I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.

                                        On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.

                                        Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Peter M
                                        I ve read all of this with interest. My mother just came back from Slovakia a few days ago. Although she didn t ruffle any feathers, she kept to her adopted
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jul 1, 2012
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                                          I've read all of this with interest.
                                          My mother just came back from Slovakia a few days ago. Although she didn't ruffle any feathers, she kept to her adopted culture (Australian) and the Slovak family was respectful of that.
                                          I think that if you explain about funeral customs (or ask someone beforehand) you won't feel embarrassed. Slovaks are cultured people and they understand things like this.

                                          Peter M.

                                          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > I've never heard of presents given.
                                          >
                                          > Which underscores Ben's caution about assumptions of "national" customs (funeral or otherwise).
                                          >
                                          > Let me mention a gift of a box of pricey citrus fruits to a Slovak by an American on the occasion of the Slovak's father's death that I'm familiar with. The American was then described as "an idiot" by the Slovak not familiar with the U.S. (perhaps limited) custom. And a query I fielded from a highly placed American executive of a U.S.--international company with a significant exposure in Slovakia (paraphrasing): "A dear Slovak friend's mother has just passed away. The [female] friend will drop by for a visit next week, what would be an appropriate present to give her on this occasion?" The following discussion confirmed that the American did intend to give her a present on the occasion of and because of her mother's death, not just a "friendship" present that the executive hoped would merely happen to work under the circumstances.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Martin
                                          >
                                        • boggiegrey
                                          Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Aug 5 12:07 PM
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                                            Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky

                                            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                            >
                                            > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                            >
                                            > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            >
                                          • William C. Wormuth
                                            Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends. And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes. 
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Aug 5 4:00 PM
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                                              Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.

                                              And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.

                                              When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes:  Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).

                                              Vilo



                                              ________________________________
                                              From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen


                                               
                                              Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky

                                              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                              >
                                              > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                              >
                                              > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              >




                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • boggiegrey
                                              Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Aug 6 5:45 AM
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                                                Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.

                                                I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.

                                                I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
                                                Jo Ann Ralbovsky


                                                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
                                                >
                                                > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
                                                >
                                                > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes:  Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
                                                >
                                                > Vilo
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > ________________________________
                                                > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                                > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >  
                                                > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                >
                                                > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                                > >
                                                > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                                > >
                                                > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                > >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                >
                                              • William C. Wormuth
                                                Joanne, Another note: When people were laid out , in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Aug 6 12:43 PM
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                                                  Joanne,

                                                  Another note: When people were "laid out", in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I see flower displays on the porches.

                                                  My Grandfather told me that he went to view the body and pray for his Irish friend.  When he entered the room, there was a round table at which were seated the mans close friend playing cards.When he approached the casket he saw that the body was not there.  He looked at the rather drunk card players and was aghast at what he saw.  They has removed their friend from his casket and place him at the table and put a beer bottle in his right hand.  Gramp was mad at them and asked how they could do such a disrespectful thing.  the answer came from o nmne of them, in a strong Irish accent "Dohncha knh ttssisah  wake ahn we-er try'an ta wake 'em oop".

                                                  Another was when a good friend died, Gramp when to the funeral.  The next day he met the departed' best friend, an Austrtian immigrant.  "John how come you weren't at your best friend's funeral.  "Maht tah hell fohrr, he ani't kamehn tah maheen".


                                                  In Burda's funeral home, there was a small kitchen leading into the viewing room.  There were always 5 or 6 men sitting there drinking whiskey.  after the burial, people went to visit the homes, bearing foods.

                                                  Which Ralbovky are you?  I would be glad to help with your genealogy,
                                                  should you start.  Ralbovsky is a name from Kúty, Slovakia and I help
                                                  many with research.  I have visited there 28 times since 1971 and know
                                                  many people there. you


                                                  S Panem Bohem,

                                                  Vilo


                                                  ________________________________
                                                  From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:45 AM
                                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo


                                                   
                                                  Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.

                                                  I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.

                                                  I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
                                                  Jo Ann Ralbovsky

                                                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
                                                  >
                                                  > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
                                                  >
                                                  > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes: Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
                                                  >
                                                  > Vilo
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > ________________________________
                                                  > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                  > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                  > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                                  > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >  
                                                  > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  > >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  >




                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • boggiegrey
                                                  Vilo, my dad s name was Anthony Cyril and his mother s first name was Justina. His father s name was Joseph. My father had a sister named Mary and another
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Aug 6 4:08 PM
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                                                    Vilo, my dad's name was Anthony Cyril and his mother's first name was Justina. His father's name was Joseph. My father had a sister named Mary and another sister named Agnes and two brothers named Joseph and Steven and a younger sister named Anna who died when she was seven years old. They came from Slovakia and lived in the Mt. Pleasant area of Schenectady for many years. My dad worked in GE for 40-plus years before retiring and was in the army during the war. He was 61 when he passed away.

                                                    I remember Johnny Lasak, the funeral director, as a very nice man. He is buried nor far from my parents graves in Sts. Cyril & Method Cemetary. I know in early times people cut their deceased's hair and made them into picture frames or other objects to remember them by. I can still remember who I was sitting by and what I was wearing when my grandmother died and we were at the funeral home. She was a member of the Third Order of St. Francis, I think it was called, and had a brown robe on, looked like a monk's robe. I probably was about ten at the time.

                                                    Any information you could come across about my family I would be interested in learning. Thanks. Jo Ann Ralbovsky



                                                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Joanne,
                                                    >
                                                    > Another note: When people were "laid out", in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I see flower displays on the porches.
                                                    >
                                                    > My Grandfather told me that he went to view the body and pray for his Irish friend.  When he entered the room, there was a round table at which were seated the mans close friend playing cards.When he approached the casket he saw that the body was not there.  He looked at the rather drunk card players and was aghast at what he saw.  They has removed their friend from his casket and place him at the table and put a beer bottle in his right hand.  Gramp was mad at them and asked how they could do such a disrespectful thing.  the answer came from o nmne of them, in a strong Irish accent "Dohncha knh ttssisah  wake ahn we-er try'an ta wake 'em oop".
                                                    >
                                                    > Another was when a good friend died, Gramp when to the funeral.  The next day he met the departed' best friend, an Austrtian immigrant.  "John how come you weren't at your best friend's funeral.  "Maht tah hell fohrr, he ani't kamehn tah maheen".
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > In Burda's funeral home, there was a small kitchen leading into the viewing room.  There were always 5 or 6 men sitting there drinking whiskey.  after the burial, people went to visit the homes, bearing foods.
                                                    >
                                                    > Which Ralbovky are you?  I would be glad to help with your genealogy,
                                                    > should you start.  Ralbovsky is a name from Kúty, Slovakia and I help
                                                    > many with research.  I have visited there 28 times since 1971 and know
                                                    > many people there. you
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > S Panem Bohem,
                                                    >
                                                    > Vilo
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > ________________________________
                                                    > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                    > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:45 AM
                                                    > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >  
                                                    > Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.
                                                    >
                                                    > I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.
                                                    >
                                                    > I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
                                                    > Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                    >
                                                    > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@> wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes: Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Vilo
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > ________________________________
                                                    > > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@>
                                                    > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                                    > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >  
                                                    > > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                    > >
                                                    > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    > > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    > >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                    >
                                                  • William
                                                    ... My mother was also buried in the brown robe of the Third Order of St. Francis. She died in September, 1958, and was laid out at home. The wake at home
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Aug 6 4:14 PM
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      On 8/6/2012 7:08 PM, boggiegrey wrote:
                                                      > >She was a member of the Third Order of St. Francis, I think it was
                                                      > called, and had a brown robe on<
                                                      My mother was also buried in the brown robe of the Third Order of St.
                                                      Francis. She died in September, 1958, and was laid out at home. The
                                                      wake at home was the custom at that time.

                                                      William F. Brna
                                                    • LongJohn Wayne
                                                      Thanks for the tales, Jo Ann & Vilko!  Fascinating. ________________________________ From: boggiegrey To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Aug 7 4:11 PM
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        Thanks for the tales, Jo Ann & Vilko!  Fascinating.



                                                        ________________________________
                                                        From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 6:08 PM
                                                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo


                                                         
                                                        Vilo, my dad's name was Anthony Cyril and his mother's first name was Justina. His father's name was Joseph. My father had a sister named Mary and another sister named Agnes and two brothers named Joseph and Steven and a younger sister named Anna who died when she was seven years old. They came from Slovakia and lived in the Mt. Pleasant area of Schenectady for many years. My dad worked in GE for 40-plus years before retiring and was in the army during the war. He was 61 when he passed away.

                                                        I remember Johnny Lasak, the funeral director, as a very nice man. He is buried nor far from my parents graves in Sts. Cyril & Method Cemetary. I know in early times people cut their deceased's hair and made them into picture frames or other objects to remember them by. I can still remember who I was sitting by and what I was wearing when my grandmother died and we were at the funeral home. She was a member of the Third Order of St. Francis, I think it was called, and had a brown robe on, looked like a monk's robe. I probably was about ten at the time.

                                                        Any information you could come across about my family I would be interested in learning. Thanks. Jo Ann Ralbovsky

                                                        --- In mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Joanne,
                                                        >
                                                        > Another note: When people were "laid out", in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I see flower displays on the porches.
                                                        >
                                                        > My Grandfather told me that he went to view the body and pray for his Irish friend.  When he entered the room, there was a round table at which were seated the mans close friend playing cards.When he approached the casket he saw that the body was not there.  He looked at the rather drunk card players and was aghast at what he saw.  They has removed their friend from his casket and place him at the table and put a beer bottle in his right hand.  Gramp was mad at them and asked how they could do such a disrespectful thing.  the answer came from o nmne of them, in a strong Irish accent "Dohncha knh ttssisah  wake ahn we-er try'an ta wake 'em oop".
                                                        >
                                                        > Another was when a good friend died, Gramp when to the funeral.  The next day he met the departed' best friend, an Austrtian immigrant.  "John how come you weren't at your best friend's funeral.  "Maht tah hell fohrr, he ani't kamehn tah maheen".
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > In Burda's funeral home, there was a small kitchen leading into the viewing room.  There were always 5 or 6 men sitting there drinking whiskey.  after the burial, people went to visit the homes, bearing foods.
                                                        >
                                                        > Which Ralbovky are you?  I would be glad to help with your genealogy,
                                                        > should you start.  Ralbovsky is a name from Kúty, Slovakia and I help
                                                        > many with research.  I have visited there 28 times since 1971 and know
                                                        > many people there. you
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > S Panem Bohem,
                                                        >
                                                        > Vilo
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > ________________________________
                                                        > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                        > To: mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com
                                                        > Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:45 AM
                                                        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >  
                                                        > Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.
                                                        >
                                                        > I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.
                                                        >
                                                        > I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
                                                        > Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                        >
                                                        > --- In mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@> wrote:
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
                                                        > >
                                                        > > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
                                                        > >
                                                        > > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes: Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Vilo
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > > ________________________________
                                                        > > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@>
                                                        > > To: mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com
                                                        > > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                                        > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > >  
                                                        > > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                        > >
                                                        > > --- In mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
                                                        > > >
                                                        > > >
                                                        > > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                                        > > >
                                                        > > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                                        > > >
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                                                      • William C. Wormuth
                                                        Joanne, I have been working on your family history and have your Grandfather s Birth/ Baptism records.  His Mother was Maria Vavra
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Aug 8 5:56 PM
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          Joanne,


                                                          I have been working on your family history and have your Grandfather's Birth/ Baptism records. 
                                                          His Mother was Maria Vavra


                                                          ________________________________
                                                          From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                          Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 7:08 PM
                                                          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo


                                                           
                                                          Vilo, my dad's name was Anthony Cyril and his mother's first name was Justina. His father's name was Joseph. My father had a sister named Mary and another sister named Agnes and two brothers named Joseph and Steven and a younger sister named Anna who died when she was seven years old. They came from Slovakia and lived in the Mt. Pleasant area of Schenectady for many years. My dad worked in GE for 40-plus years before retiring and was in the army during the war. He was 61 when he passed away.

                                                          I remember Johnny Lasak, the funeral director, as a very nice man. He is buried nor far from my parents graves in Sts. Cyril & Method Cemetary. I know in early times people cut their deceased's hair and made them into picture frames or other objects to remember them by. I can still remember who I was sitting by and what I was wearing when my grandmother died and we were at the funeral home. She was a member of the Third Order of St. Francis, I think it was called, and had a brown robe on, looked like a monk's robe. I probably was about ten at the time.

                                                          Any information you could come across about my family I would be interested in learning. Thanks. Jo Ann Ralbovsky

                                                          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > Joanne,
                                                          >
                                                          > Another note: When people were "laid out", in their homes, a basket filled with flowers was hung on the wall next to the door.  I think  that when I see flower displays on the porches.
                                                          >
                                                          > My Grandfather told me that he went to view the body and pray for his Irish friend.  When he entered the room, there was a round table at which were seated the mans close friend playing cards.When he approached the casket he saw that the body was not there.  He looked at the rather drunk card players and was aghast at what he saw.  They has removed their friend from his casket and place him at the table and put a beer bottle in his right hand.  Gramp was mad at them and asked how they could do such a disrespectful thing.  the answer came from o nmne of them, in a strong Irish accent "Dohncha knh ttssisah  wake ahn we-er try'an ta wake 'em oop".
                                                          >
                                                          > Another was when a good friend died, Gramp when to the funeral.  The next day he met the departed' best friend, an Austrtian immigrant.  "John how come you weren't at your best friend's funeral.  "Maht tah hell fohrr, he ani't kamehn tah maheen".
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > In Burda's funeral home, there was a small kitchen leading into the viewing room.  There were always 5 or 6 men sitting there drinking whiskey.  after the burial, people went to visit the homes, bearing foods.
                                                          >
                                                          > Which Ralbovky are you?  I would be glad to help with your genealogy,
                                                          > should you start.  Ralbovsky is a name from Kúty, Slovakia and I help
                                                          > many with research.  I have visited there 28 times since 1971 and know
                                                          > many people there. you
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > S Panem Bohem,
                                                          >
                                                          > Vilo
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > ________________________________
                                                          > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@...>
                                                          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                          > Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:45 AM
                                                          > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen/Vilo
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >  
                                                          > Vilo, my father was Slovak and mother Polish. Lasak Funeral Home did bury our family when it was located on Congress Street, across from St. Cyril Church and then moved to its Chrysler Street location. I was still young back then, but remember people bringing Mass Cards and food. My Polish aunt told me of how they waked family members at home prior to funeral homes years ago. Yearly my family would go up to Auriesville and have masses said for the deceased of the family.
                                                          >
                                                          > I live in the village of Waterford and know of a local funeral home there that prepares a home-cooked meal for a family during a wake which I think is very nice. I never heard of a funeral home doing that other than maybe years ago at Parker Brothers Funeral Home in Watervliet which my mother's side of the family used.
                                                          >
                                                          > I did come across a small white wicker basket years ago that someone told me was hung on doors at homes where young children were being waked. A custom for mourners was to put a light-colored flower into the basket when they entered a home waking a child.
                                                          > Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                          >
                                                          > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@> wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Joanne Ralbovsky/Cuca and Judy Wormuth were close friends.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > And am I from Johnstown, Novy Yorku.  Before funeral homes opened, we brought Foods to the homes.  Later, the only gifts were mass Cards and flowers.  tell me, what were the gifts????    Slovaks used Lasak, (Schenectady), until Frank Burda began to direct funerals.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > When people began using funeral homes, we had three ethnic funeral homes: Maggie Dunn, (Irish), Donnan, (Italian) and Burda, (Slovak).
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Vilo
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > > ________________________________
                                                          > > From: boggiegrey <boggiegrey@>
                                                          > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                          > > Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 3:07 PM
                                                          > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: modern funeral practices in Slovakia?/Karen
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > >  
                                                          > > Karen, I am Slovak and live in upstate, New York, near Albany, and I have heard of the practice of funeral gifts. I grew up knowing about it and seeing it at funerals in my own family. Jo Ann Ralbovsky
                                                          > >
                                                          > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Karen Kosky <trixielixir@> wrote:
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > I wouldn't profess to know what goes on in every corner of this vast country. All I can say is this practice of funeral gifts is completely unheard of in NY amongst the numerous faiths that I attend services for.
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > On another subject, I am curious of something. I have a photo from my grandmother's brother's funeral procession in Slovakia in the 40s. There is a girl wearing a wedding dress. When I questioned my mother, she quite nonchalantly said that was the girl he was going to marry. I couldn't quite decide if that was sweet or disturbing. I'm curious if this sort of display still goes on.
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android
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