Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Traditional folk festival food

Expand Messages
  • JohnS
    Dakujem. Two things we always have here at our family reunions are holubky and pagač. Some of us couldn t make it through the rest of the year without pagač.
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Dakujem. Two things we always have here at our family reunions are holubky and pagač. Some of us couldn't make it through the rest of the year without pagač. Is it as popular there as here? On our first and only visit this past summer we only found it once. Maybe we weren't looking in the right place. It was also different than what we were used to; more of a flaky, nearly pastry like texture. Ours is more typically bread with potato. And my Grandma used to make an even thicker, bread type she called "beluš." That's a guess on the spelling. But we also didn't have it at picnics as much as holidays. Have you heard of that one?

      John

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Helene,
      >
      > You forgot something......Slivovica and wine.   :o)  :o)  :o)
      >
      > John, Now ya godit allllll.
      >
      > Z Bohom,
      >
      > Vilo
      >
      >
      > Sent: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 10:30 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food
      >
      >
      >  
      > Hi John,
      >
      > Traditional festival foods would include parky (hot dogs) and sausages cooked on the grill and also chicken and gulas, usually served with a pickle and a piece or two of rye bread - really tasty! Of course beer and wine to wash it down!
      >
      > At Detva festival I look for the huge trays of home-made strudel or kolac - - the apple one is super; the poppy seed one and the curd cheese one heavenly too - my mother told me the dough should be so thin almost non- existent and rolled up many times and the filling really full - so that the filling creates a lot of "dusa" or soul!
      >
      > Sometimes wonderful baked goods like this can be found in small bakeries in Slovakia and more likely in people's homes.You can buy packaged strudel in the stores there - but it is just not the same at all.
      >
      > For people in a hurry the gas stations have become like mini-markets and you can actually get a "sendvic{", a sandwich - not typical fare there (there are even healthy ones) and sometimes some home-made or similar baked goods, this varies of course. Some stations have full fledged restaurants like a cafeteria with surprisingly good soup and gulas.
      >
      > helene
      >
      > --- On Tue, 10/4/11, JohnS <john@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: JohnS <john@...>
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 11:21 AM
      >
      >  
      >
      > Considering the discussion on chimney cakes and trdelnik, what really are the more common traditional folk festival foods?
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Helen Fedor
      My mom made something we called a bejleš , which was two layers of bread dough (a slightly modified paska dough, I believe), with a filling of sauteed
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        My mom made something we called a "bejle�", which was two layers of bread dough (a slightly modified paska dough, I believe), with a filling of sauteed cabbage, rolled out to fit a cookie sheet (i.e. the size of a sheet cake).

        H




        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        From: john@...
        Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 12:47:20 +0000
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional folk festival food






        Dakujem. Two things we always have here at our family reunions are holubky and pagač. Some of us couldn't make it through the rest of the year without pagač. Is it as popular there as here? On our first and only visit this past summer we only found it once. Maybe we weren't looking in the right place. It was also different than what we were used to; more of a flaky, nearly pastry like texture. Ours is more typically bread with potato. And my Grandma used to make an even thicker, bread type she called "belu�." That's a guess on the spelling. But we also didn't have it at picnics as much as holidays. Have you heard of that one?

        John

        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Helene,
        >
        > You forgot something......Slivovica and wine.� � :o)� :o)� :o)
        >
        > John, Now ya godit allllll.
        >
        > Z Bohom,
        >
        > Vilo
        >
        >
        > Sent: Tuesday, October 4, 2011 10:30 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food
        >
        >
        > �
        > Hi John,
        >
        > Traditional festival foods would include parky (hot dogs) and sausages cooked on the grill and also chicken and gulas, usually served with a pickle and a piece or two of rye bread - really tasty! Of course beer and wine to wash it down!
        >
        > At Detva festival I look for the huge trays of home-made strudel or kolac - - the apple one is super; the poppy seed one and the curd cheese one heavenly too - my mother told me the dough should be so thin almost non- existent and rolled up many times and the filling really full - so that the filling creates a lot of "dusa" or soul!
        >
        > Sometimes wonderful baked goods like this can be found in small bakeries in Slovakia and more likely in people's homes.You can buy packaged strudel in the stores there - but it is just not the same at all.
        >
        > For people in a hurry the gas stations have become like mini-markets and you can actually get a "sendvic{", a sandwich - not typical fare there (there are even healthy ones) and sometimes some home-made or similar baked goods, this varies of course. Some stations have full fledged restaurants like a cafeteria with surprisingly good soup and gulas.
        >
        > helene
        >
        > --- On Tue, 10/4/11, JohnS <john@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: JohnS <john@...>
        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 11:21 AM
        >
        > �
        >
        > Considering the discussion on chimney cakes and trdelnik, what really are the more common traditional folk festival foods?
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... It was a long [e ] perceived through English, which renders the foreign-language long [e ] as [ey]. The Hungarian be les means (insulating) lining and
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          > My mom made something we called a "bejleš",
          > which was two layers of bread dough [...] with a filling

          It was a long [e'] perceived through English, which renders the foreign-language long [e'] as [ey]. The Hungarian be'les means "(insulating) lining" and is also used as a name of the type of "padded" cake that you describe.


          Martin
        • votrubam
          ... The version you saw is fairly common in Slovakia, Janko. It s typical of the Balkans (including Turkey), form where it spread in the Kingdom of Hungary,
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            > pagač. [...] Is it as popular there as here? On our first
            > and only visit this past summer we only found it once. Maybe
            > we weren't looking in the right place. It was also different
            > than what we were used to; more of a flaky, nearly pastry like
            > texture. Ours is more typically bread with potato.

            The version you saw is fairly common in Slovakia, Janko. It's typical of the Balkans (including Turkey), form where it spread in the Kingdom of Hungary, all the way to Austria.

            It comes from Latin, the same Latin word/old kind of bread gave _focaccia_. It started as flatbread baked on coals in the Roman times and morphed into the modern focaccia in Italy and the pagac in the Balkans.


            Martin
          • Helen Fedor
            No, my mom wrote it down in her cookbook/notebook with the j . H To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com From: votrubam@yahoo.com Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 14:36:58
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              No, my mom wrote it down in her cookbook/notebook with the 'j'.

              H




              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              From: votrubam@...
              Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 14:36:58 +0000
              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional folk festival food






              > My mom made something we called a "bejle�",
              > which was two layers of bread dough [...] with a filling

              It was a long [e'] perceived through English, which renders the foreign-language long [e'] as [ey]. The Hungarian be'les means "(insulating) lining" and is also used as a name of the type of "padded" cake that you describe.

              Martin






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • dragansk
              I was at a cabbage festival in Stupava in the Zahorie region of Slovakia three years ago. They had lots of recently harvested cabbage that was shredded on the
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                I was at a cabbage festival in Stupava in the Zahorie region of Slovakia three years ago. They had lots of recently harvested cabbage that was shredded on the spot for tasking and buying. There were also numerous booths selling the "early" wine (does anyone know what this is called in Slovak?). It was really big at the festival. Another big there was a hot honey-flavored beverage, medavina, I think it was called, that was really good. Also many other festival foods were available.

                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, helene cincebeaux <helenezx@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi John,
                >
                > Traditional festival foods would include parky (hot dogs) and sausages cooked on the grill and also chicken and gulas, usually served with a pickle and a piece or two of rye bread - really tasty! Of course beer and wine to wash it down!
                >
                > At Detva festival I look for the huge trays of home-made strudel or kolac - - the apple one is super; the poppy seed one and the curd cheese one heavenly too - my mother told me the dough should be so thin almost non- existent and rolled up many times and the filling really full - so that the filling creates a lot of "dusa" or soul!
                >
                > Sometimes wonderful baked goods like this can be found in small bakeries in Slovakia and more likely in people's homes.You can buy packaged strudel in the stores there - but it is just not the same at all.
                >
                > For people in a hurry the gas stations have become like mini-markets and you can actually get a "sendvic{", a sandwich - not typical fare there (there are even healthy ones) and sometimes some home-made or similar baked goods, this varies of course. Some stations have full fledged restaurants like a cafeteria with surprisingly good soup and gulas.
                >
                >
                > helene
                >
                > --- On Tue, 10/4/11, JohnS <john@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: JohnS <john@...>
                > Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food
                > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 11:21 AM
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >  
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Considering the discussion on chimney cakes and trdelnik, what really are the more common traditional folk festival foods?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • votrubam
                ... Thank you, Helen. Martin
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  > wrote it down in her cookbook/notebook with the 'j'.

                  Thank you, Helen.


                  Martin
                • votrubam
                  ... The correct version is burc~iak, but the type of new wine only exists in the south-west in Slovakia where the locals call it burc~a k in the local
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > the "early" wine (does anyone know what this is called in Slovak?

                    The "correct" version is burc~iak, but the type of new wine only exists in the south-west in Slovakia where the locals call it burc~a'k in the local dialect and view the standardized version with disdain. It's called Sturm in Austria. The Slovak name is also related to "storm" (burka).


                    Martin
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    Try this for a good look at the wine cellars of Petrov na Moravie:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=macffHMFHGw Ahhhhh....       Burc~ak!  I have
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Try this for a good look at the wine cellars of Petrov na Moravie:
                       
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=macffHMFHGw


                      Ahhhhh....       Burc~ak!  I have enjoyed it many, many, many    times. They have booths in Sas~tin every year at the celebration of our Lady of sorrows, Patroness of Slovakia and I have been to both Skalica and Petrov, for the tasting of Burc~ak.

                      I Kúty, Belus~e is fried bread dough.  The dough is taken by the handful flattened with fingers and deep fried.  Both Greeks and Italians make it.

                      Just got home from JFK to get Klara Vytrisalová, from Rimavska Sobota.  She had a good flight and we a problem free trip down, 3 1/2 hrs down and because of traffic in the Bronx, 5 hrs. home.  Beautiful day.


                      She will be here with her son Miro, (MD) and grand-daughter Milka, (18 Months), until December 12.

                      I f I can't travel to my beloved Slovakia, at least I can have Slovak company.

                      Z Bohom,

                      Vilo




                      ________________________________
                      From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 3:24 PM
                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional folk festival food


                       
                      > the "early" wine (does anyone know what this is called in Slovak?

                      The "correct" version is burc~iak, but the type of new wine only exists in the south-west in Slovakia where the locals call it burc~a'k in the local dialect and view the standardized version with disdain. It's called Sturm in Austria. The Slovak name is also related to "storm" (burka).

                      Martin




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • helene cincebeaux
                      Hi  - the new wine is burc~ak, often a milky green color. It s only available for a short time. When it s that time the road to Bratislava is lined with
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 5, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi  - the new wine is burc~ak, often a milky green color. It's only available for a short time.
                        When it's that time the road to Bratislava is lined with tables in front of homes with a few bottles of burc~ak for sale on each one. When you drink it - it seems like grape juice but when you stand up the kick kicks in.

                        helene

                        --- On Wed, 10/5/11, dragansk <dragansk@...> wrote:

                        From: dragansk <dragansk@...>
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional folk festival food
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 2:14 PM
















                         









                        I was at a cabbage festival in Stupava in the Zahorie region of Slovakia three years ago. They had lots of recently harvested cabbage that was shredded on the spot for tasking and buying. There were also numerous booths selling the "early" wine (does anyone know what this is called in Slovak?). It was really big at the festival. Another big there was a hot honey-flavored beverage, medavina, I think it was called, that was really good. Also many other festival foods were available.



                        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, helene cincebeaux <helenezx@...> wrote:

                        >

                        > Hi John,

                        >

                        > Traditional festival foods would include parky (hot dogs) and sausages cooked on the grill and also chicken and gulas, usually served with a pickle and a piece or two of rye bread - really tasty! Of course beer and wine to wash it down!

                        >

                        > At Detva festival I look for the huge trays of home-made strudel or kolac - - the apple one is super; the poppy seed one and the curd cheese one heavenly too - my mother told me the dough should be so thin almost non- existent and rolled up many times and the filling really full - so that the filling creates a lot of "dusa" or soul!

                        >

                        > Sometimes wonderful baked goods like this can be found in small bakeries in Slovakia and more likely in people's homes.You can buy packaged strudel in the stores there - but it is just not the same at all.

                        >

                        > For people in a hurry the gas stations have become like mini-markets and you can actually get a "sendvic{", a sandwich - not typical fare there (there are even healthy ones) and sometimes some home-made or similar baked goods, this varies of course. Some stations have full fledged restaurants like a cafeteria with surprisingly good soup and gulas.

                        >

                        >

                        > helene

                        >

                        > --- On Tue, 10/4/11, JohnS <john@...> wrote:

                        >

                        > From: JohnS <john@...>

                        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional folk festival food

                        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

                        > Date: Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 11:21 AM

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >  

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        > Considering the discussion on chimney cakes and trdelnik, what really are the more common traditional folk festival foods?

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        >

                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        >



























                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.