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Tin cup

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  • JohnS
    when I was about 12 years old my grandfather gave me a, for lack of a better description, tin cup, an enameled, with flowered decoration, simple cup. When we
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 18, 2011
      when I was about 12 years old my grandfather gave me a, for lack of a better description, tin cup, an enameled, with flowered decoration, simple cup. When we were at a festival in Kezmarok this summer I was surprised to see a near duplicate of it. I've put a picture of one in the photo section (Sofranko folder). It is stamped Made in Czechoslovakia on the bottom. My grandfather was never in the "old country" (his father immigrated here in 1891) so I was surprised to see it.Was this a popular import? Has anyone else seen one? I will take a picture of my original soon and post it as well.

      John
    • Sue
      My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to This Little Piggy Went to Market , but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe).
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 19, 2011
        My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ben Sorensen
        There are many versions of Varila Mys~ic~ka kas~ic~ku.  I can guide you to this site: http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1204&c=30 but even this one doesn t
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 19, 2011
          There are many versions of "Varila Mys~ic~ka kas~ic~ku."  I can guide you to this site: http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1204&c=30%c2%a0but even this one doesn't have that very "violent" version that is often used. :-) 
          Ben


          ________________________________
          From: Sue <AltoClar@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 4:19 PM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Kids Hand Game (?)


           
          My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mjkopanic
          Sue, My mother was born in Slovakia, and she used to do this with my children when they were little. I have her recorded on videotape doing this, but I do not
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 27, 2011
            Sue,

            My mother was born in Slovakia, and she used to do this with my children when they were little.

            I have her recorded on videotape doing this, but I do not have the exact words written down, and it would take me some time to find the exact location on my many VHS tapes where she did this ditty. The girls loved it, and she tickled them at the end.

            Mike

            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Sue <AltoClar@...> wrote:
            >
            > My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • amymemom
            ... Hudoshek Bubushek Sochy Vosik Dinishuk Aten stady pishuk tickling little toe) - svitch im du pekla I hope I didn t kill the language!!!!
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 30, 2011
              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Sue <AltoClar@...> wrote:
              >
              > My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??
              >
              > This is what I remember - with the toes - (phonetically)starting with the big toe:
              Hudoshek
              Bubushek
              Sochy Vosik
              Dinishuk
              Aten stady pishuk tickling little toe) - svitch im du pekla

              I hope I didn't kill the language!!!!

              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • dragansk
              This post reminded me of a video I took 21 years ago in my grandmother s village, C~ernina, in eastern Slovakia. Here s the youtube link to the video if anyone
              Message 6 of 17 , Oct 1, 2011
                This post reminded me of a video I took 21 years ago in my grandmother's village, C~ernina, in eastern Slovakia. Here's the youtube link to the video if anyone would like to see two "clapping" games. The second game at the end is much shorter than the first.

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2g2Al34dVP0

                Dennis


                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amymemom" <amymemom@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Sue <AltoClar@> wrote:
                > >
                > > My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??
                > >
                > > This is what I remember - with the toes - (phonetically)starting with the big toe:
                > Hudoshek
                > Bubushek
                > Sochy Vosik
                > Dinishuk
                > Aten stady pishuk tickling little toe) - svitch im du pekla
                >
                > I hope I didn't kill the language!!!!
                >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
              • Marycay Doolittle
                Thanks Dennis. ... From: dragansk To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 10:49 AM Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Kids Hand Game (?)
                Message 7 of 17 , Oct 1, 2011
                  Thanks Dennis.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: dragansk
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 10:49 AM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Kids Hand Game (?)



                  This post reminded me of a video I took 21 years ago in my grandmother's village, C~ernina, in eastern Slovakia. Here's the youtube link to the video if anyone would like to see two "clapping" games. The second game at the end is much shorter than the first.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2g2Al34dVP0

                  Dennis

                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amymemom" <amymemom@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Sue <AltoClar@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??
                  > >
                  > > This is what I remember - with the toes - (phonetically)starting with the big toe:
                  > Hudoshek
                  > Bubushek
                  > Sochy Vosik
                  > Dinishuk
                  > Aten stady pishuk tickling little toe) - svitch im du pekla
                  >
                  > I hope I didn't kill the language!!!!
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Joe Armata
                  We were just talking about chimney cakes - by chance, I ran across this Polish video showing them being made in the Pieniny mountains near the Polish/Slovak
                  Message 8 of 17 , Oct 1, 2011
                    We were just talking about chimney cakes - by chance, I ran across this
                    Polish video showing them being made in the Pieniny mountains near the
                    Polish/Slovak border.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BkrD6wfB3M


                    Joe
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    Thanks Joe, This was most interesting.  The flisacy are like the Skalicky trdelnik except trdelnik are thicker .  It makes me soooo hungry for them. 
                    Message 9 of 17 , Oct 2, 2011
                      Thanks Joe, This was most interesting.  The "flisacy" are like the Skalicky trdelnik except trdelnik are "thicker".  It makes me soooo hungry for them.  Richard Novotny's cousin, Sestra Martina Novotnová, paid our was back in ľééž.  Sister is noe in residence in the Fárský  úrad in Banská Bystrica.  I visited her last year and my cousin who was with me then just called yesterday and told me he was just there visiting again.  Ah memories, memories........

                      Thanks again!

                      A Bohom,

                      Vilo



                      ________________________________
                      From: Joe Armata <armata@...>
                      To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, October 1, 2011 11:06 PM
                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Video on Chimney Cakes


                       
                      We were just talking about chimney cakes - by chance, I ran across this
                      Polish video showing them being made in the Pieniny mountains near the
                      Polish/Slovak border.

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BkrD6wfB3M

                      Joe




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • helene cincebeaux
                      Hi All,       Joy Kovalycsik noted that The Carpathian Connection http://www.tccweb.org has just undergone a major update. Our focus is exclusively on
                      Message 10 of 17 , Oct 2, 2011
                        Hi All,

                              Joy Kovalycsik noted that The Carpathian Connection http://www.tccweb.org has just undergone a major update. "Our focus is exclusively on Slovakia and we have tons of

                        information for researchers," she noted.


                        helene
















                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • votrubam
                        ... I m not sure they d like to hear that, Vilko. The video does not say what the guy may call the cake. _Flisacy_ means rafters in Polish. A man in a
                        Message 11 of 17 , Oct 2, 2011
                          > The "flisacy" are like the Skalicky trdelnik

                          I'm not sure they'd like to hear that, Vilko. The video does not say what the guy may call the cake. _Flisacy_ means "rafters" in Polish. A man in a rafters'/local folk outfit makes the cake in the video, but of course, most local rafters have not been making deserts. They supplement their income from other jobs by taking people down the Dunajec on wooden rafts (it would be hard to make one's living year round with that as one's only or main job).

                          The chimney cake is a fledgling, very recent, import to the region (Szczawnica in Poland, about half a mile north of the Slovak border), made possible by the marketing of the grill-ovens the guy in the video uses to make it, but if it takes off, it can surely be refashioned into a "traditional local specialty" in a decade or two, e.g., like trdelnik is ubiquitous and "traditional" all over Prague's touristy downtown now, while it was nonexistent there and much of the Czech Reupblic (as well as Slovakia) merely a decade or two ago.


                          Martin
                        • William C. Wormuth
                          Thanks Martin, I wrote the message reading from the title and not listening.  It is very interesting that that it came about because of {marketing of the
                          Message 12 of 17 , Oct 3, 2011
                            Thanks Martin,

                            I wrote the message reading from the title and not listening.  It is very interesting that that it came about because of "{marketing of the grill-ovens".  My friend was given a wooden "Pin", by a woman who bakes the trdelnik in Skalice and he would really like to make it but has no oven to put it in.  We wonder if it cannot be made in a rotisserie oven??Pin" The rafting there was SUPER and the Pieniny are beautiful.

                            Hope to see you in November.

                            S Panem Bohom

                            Vilo



                            ________________________________
                            From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, October 3, 2011 1:43 AM
                            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Video on Chimney Cakes


                             
                            > The "flisacy" are like the Skalicky trdelnik

                            I'm not sure they'd like to hear that, Vilko. The video does not say what the guy may call the cake. _Flisacy_ means "rafters" in Polish. A man in a rafters'/local folk outfit makes the cake in the video, but of course, most local rafters have not been making deserts. They supplement their income from other jobs by taking people down the Dunajec on wooden rafts (it would be hard to make one's living year round with that as one's only or main job).

                            The chimney cake is a fledgling, very recent, import to the region (Szczawnica in Poland, about half a mile north of the Slovak border), made possible by the marketing of the grill-ovens the guy in the video uses to make it, but if it takes off, it can surely be refashioned into a "traditional local specialty" in a decade or two, e.g., like trdelnik is ubiquitous and "traditional" all over Prague's touristy downtown now, while it was nonexistent there and much of the Czech Reupblic (as well as Slovakia) merely a decade or two ago.

                            Martin




                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • votrubam
                            ... Yes, it was so new in Szczawnica, Poland, when the video was made three years ago that they did not even have a name for it. They referred to it as just
                            Message 13 of 17 , Oct 3, 2011
                              > not listening.

                              Yes, it was so new in Szczawnica, Poland, when the video was made three years ago that they did not even have a name for it. They referred to it as just "a cake." The traditional north-eastern Polish chimney cake is different (scroll down, on the left):

                              <http://www.pitt.edu/~votruba/qsonhist/trdelnikbaumkuchenstovepipecookie.html>


                              > that it came
                              > about because of "{marketing of the grill-ovens". My friend
                              > was given a wooden "Pin", by a woman who bakes the trdelnik
                              > in Skalice and he would really like to make it but has no oven
                              > to put it in.  We wonder if it cannot be made in a rotisserie
                              > oven??

                              Now that trdelnik is becoming somewhat better known in Slovakia, some bake it in the oven at home. They wind it around an alufoil-covered rolling pin. A rotisserie oven with a thick pin might work too, if not better (the one in the video baked-roasted it in ca. 10 minutes). A bigger problem appears to be the dough, which needs to be raised, but falls off the spit if it is not sufficiently dense at the same time.

                              Of course, aficionados of the "true" trdelnik are horrified. It needs to be baked-roasted over the coals. The roasting takes about 15-20 minutes.


                              Martin
                            • Joe Armata
                              The first episode of Who Do You Think You Are featured Martin Sheen discovering that his ggggGrandfather Don Diego on one branch of his family tree was a judge
                              Message 14 of 17 , Feb 4, 2012
                                The first episode of Who Do You Think You Are featured Martin Sheen
                                discovering that his ggggGrandfather Don Diego on one branch of his
                                family tree was a judge who prosecuted his ggggGrandmother Antonia on
                                another branch. This was presented as astonishing and remarkable.

                                Actually, as I think about it, it's probably very common. If each
                                generation included 4 children, all of them reproducing, by the time it
                                got down to Martin Sheen's parents' generation, there'd be over 1,000
                                descendants each for Diego and Antonia. That's a lot of possible matches
                                between the two lines.

                                Add in that Don Diego was a judge, and must have prosecuted many
                                hundreds if not thousands of people during his career, then the pool of
                                descendants from everyone Diego ever prosecuted must have been
                                astronomical in Martin Sheen's parents' time. It seems to me that many
                                (even most?) people descended from Don Diego would be able to trace a
                                branch back to someone he prosecuted.

                                Am I thinking straight here?

                                Joe
                              • Donna Lachney
                                Joe. That was a great show.  I really enjoyed watching Martin Sheen and watching his delight in finding about all his past relatives.   I know how I would
                                Message 15 of 17 , Feb 4, 2012
                                  Joe.
                                  That was a great show.  I really enjoyed watching Martin Sheen and watching his delight in finding about all his past relatives.   I know how I would feel traveling around Slovakia to visit relatives and finding all about them.  Don Diego sure got around.  Everything you said sure is the truth about the Sheen family, how canny.
                                   
                                  Donna
                                   


                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Joe Armata <armata@...>
                                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Saturday, February 4, 2012 3:58 PM
                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Who Do You Think You Are - Martin Sheen


                                   

                                  The first episode of Who Do You Think You Are featured Martin Sheen
                                  discovering that his ggggGrandfather Don Diego on one branch of his
                                  family tree was a judge who prosecuted his ggggGrandmother Antonia on
                                  another branch. This was presented as astonishing and remarkable.

                                  Actually, as I think about it, it's probably very common. If each
                                  generation included 4 children, all of them reproducing, by the time it
                                  got down to Martin Sheen's parents' generation, there'd be over 1,000
                                  descendants each for Diego and Antonia. That's a lot of possible matches
                                  between the two lines.

                                  Add in that Don Diego was a judge, and must have prosecuted many
                                  hundreds if not thousands of people during his career, then the pool of
                                  descendants from everyone Diego ever prosecuted must have been
                                  astronomical in Martin Sheen's parents' time. It seems to me that many
                                  (even most?) people descended from Don Diego would be able to trace a
                                  branch back to someone he prosecuted.

                                  Am I thinking straight here?

                                  Joe




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • amymemom
                                  I remember that game so well - I played it with my children and grandchildren....it is my understanding that the svitch im du pekla means something like
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Feb 10, 2012
                                    I remember that game so well - I played it with my children and grandchildren....it is my understanding that the "svitch im du pekla" means something like "throw it in the stove"....lol...go figure!!


                                    --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "amymemom" <amymemom@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Sue <AltoClar@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > My family used to do something to us when we were kids, with our hands, similar to "This Little Piggy Went to Market", but it was in Slovak (or Czech maybe). All I remember is that it involved Mama stirring the pot and cutting one's head off. Does anybody know the words (and the translation) to this??
                                    > >
                                    > > This is what I remember - with the toes - (phonetically)starting with the big toe:
                                    > Hudoshek
                                    > Bubushek
                                    > Sochy Vosik
                                    > Dinishuk
                                    > Aten stady pishuk tickling little toe) - svitch im du pekla
                                    >
                                    > I hope I didn't kill the language!!!!
                                    >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • amymemom
                                    Not to mention that Don Diego had 5 illegitimate children by Antonia and was quite the ladies man..... It must be in the blood....
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Feb 10, 2012
                                      Not to mention that Don Diego had 5 illegitimate children by Antonia and was quite the ladies man.....
                                      It must be in the blood....

                                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Joe Armata <armata@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > The first episode of Who Do You Think You Are featured Martin Sheen
                                      > discovering that his ggggGrandfather Don Diego on one branch of his
                                      > family tree was a judge who prosecuted his ggggGrandmother Antonia on
                                      > another branch. This was presented as astonishing and remarkable.
                                      >
                                      > Actually, as I think about it, it's probably very common. If each
                                      > generation included 4 children, all of them reproducing, by the time it
                                      > got down to Martin Sheen's parents' generation, there'd be over 1,000
                                      > descendants each for Diego and Antonia. That's a lot of possible matches
                                      > between the two lines.
                                      >
                                      > Add in that Don Diego was a judge, and must have prosecuted many
                                      > hundreds if not thousands of people during his career, then the pool of
                                      > descendants from everyone Diego ever prosecuted must have been
                                      > astronomical in Martin Sheen's parents' time. It seems to me that many
                                      > (even most?) people descended from Don Diego would be able to trace a
                                      > branch back to someone he prosecuted.
                                      >
                                      > Am I thinking straight here?
                                      >
                                      > Joe
                                      >
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