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Traveling in Slovakia

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  • igiles
    Hi, everyone! I wanted to share a travel update. I just spent a wonderful morning with a textile curator at Western Slovakia Museum in Trnava
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 7, 2011
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      Hi, everyone! I wanted to share a travel update. I just spent a wonderful morning with a textile curator at Western Slovakia Museum in Trnava (Západoslovenské Múzeum). The staff was warm and welcoming – and both the curator and the director went out of their way to prepare slides and information for me. The curator prevailed upon me to visit the rest of the muzeum (and fight my urge to solely focus on vysivky). I was very glad I did. It’s an intimate museum filled with a wide variety of artifacts from Western Slovakia. I highly recommend the museum if you haven’t visited it.



      Last week I spent three days with a wonderful family in Ocovo learning kriva ihla, Slovakia’s version of tambour work. As we were preparing to leave on Saturday I realized Pani Maria had packaged the frame (rad) on which I had been working. She was giving me her beautiful hand-made embroidery frame! She wouldn’t listen to my offers to pay her (as if I could ever pay her what the frame was worth!)



      I spent an entire day Monday looking for packaging materials. I finally found a box outside a flower shop – one used for sun flowers. The shop owner wouldn’t take any money for it. I think she was happy she didn’t have to dispose of the box. I feel the heavy responsibility of practicing and learning kriva ihla well and passing Maria’s knowledge forward. She thoughtfully copied vzory (patterns) for me, too. The postal clerk asked me what the package was worth as she read over my customs’ declaration form. The American Express advertisement came to mind: priceless!

      Last week kriva ihla. This week zlate vysivke from Trnava. Life doesn’t get much better than this! And did I mention Pani Maria made dumplings stuffed with prunes in POPPY SEED (my favorite food!!) for my good-bye lunch? I tried to control myself but it was difficult.



      I am so grateful to the wonderfully warm and welcoming Slovak people. Contact me anytime off line if you would like to discuss needlework anytime! - Inez





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Inez, You might like to visit the Záhoracké Múzeum in Skalica (http://www.zahorskemuzeum.sk/).  If you do, try their specialty dessert, Trdelnik . Vilo
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 7, 2011
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        Inez,

        You might like to visit the Záhoracké Múzeum in Skalica (http://www.zahorskemuzeum.sk/)


        If you do, try their specialty dessert, "Trdelnik".

        Vilo



        ________________________________
        From: igiles <igiles@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 10:54 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Traveling in Slovakia


         
        Hi, everyone! I wanted to share a travel update. I just spent a wonderful morning with a textile curator at Western Slovakia Museum in Trnava (Západoslovenské Múzeum). The staff was warm and welcoming – and both the curator and the director went out of their way to prepare slides and information for me. The curator prevailed upon me to visit the rest of the muzeum (and fight my urge to solely focus on vysivky). I was very glad I did. It’s an intimate museum filled with a wide variety of artifacts from Western Slovakia. I highly recommend the museum if you haven’t visited it.

        Last week I spent three days with a wonderful family in Ocovo learning kriva ihla, Slovakia’s version of tambour work. As we were preparing to leave on Saturday I realized Pani Maria had packaged the frame (rad) on which I had been working. She was giving me her beautiful hand-made embroidery frame! She wouldn’t listen to my offers to pay her (as if I could ever pay her what the frame was worth!)

        I spent an entire day Monday looking for packaging materials. I finally found a box outside a flower shop – one used for sun flowers. The shop owner wouldn’t take any money for it. I think she was happy she didn’t have to dispose of the box. I feel the heavy responsibility of practicing and learning kriva ihla well and passing Maria’s knowledge forward. She thoughtfully copied vzory (patterns) for me, too. The postal clerk asked me what the package was worth as she read over my customs’ declaration form. The American Express advertisement came to mind: priceless!

        Last week kriva ihla. This week zlate vysivke from Trnava. Life doesn’t get much better than this! And did I mention Pani Maria made dumplings stuffed with prunes in POPPY SEED (my favorite food!!) for my good-bye lunch? I tried to control myself but it was difficult.

        I am so grateful to the wonderfully warm and welcoming Slovak people. Contact me anytime off line if you would like to discuss needlework anytime! - Inez

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • igiles
        Vilo, thanks for the museum and dish suggestions - Inez From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C.
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 7, 2011
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          Vilo, thanks for the museum and dish suggestions - Inez



          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William C. Wormuth
          Sent: Wednesday, September 07, 2011 11:14 AM
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Traveling in Slovakia





          Inez,

          You might like to visit the Záhoracké Múzeum in Skalica (http://www.zahorskemuzeum.sk/).

          If you do, try their specialty dessert, "Trdelnik".

          Vilo

          ________________________________
          From: igiles <igiles@... <mailto:igiles%40comcast.net> >
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 10:54 AM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Traveling in Slovakia


          Hi, everyone! I wanted to share a travel update. I just spent a wonderful morning with a textile curator at Western Slovakia Museum in Trnava (Západoslovenské Múzeum). The staff was warm and welcoming – and both the curator and the director went out of their way to prepare slides and information for me. The curator prevailed upon me to visit the rest of the muzeum (and fight my urge to solely focus on vysivky). I was very glad I did. It’s an intimate museum filled with a wide variety of artifacts from Western Slovakia. I highly recommend the museum if you haven’t visited it.

          Last week I spent three days with a wonderful family in Ocovo learning kriva ihla, Slovakia’s version of tambour work. As we were preparing to leave on Saturday I realized Pani Maria had packaged the frame (rad) on which I had been working. She was giving me her beautiful hand-made embroidery frame! She wouldn’t listen to my offers to pay her (as if I could ever pay her what the frame was worth!)

          I spent an entire day Monday looking for packaging materials. I finally found a box outside a flower shop – one used for sun flowers. The shop owner wouldn’t take any money for it. I think she was happy she didn’t have to dispose of the box. I feel the heavy responsibility of practicing and learning kriva ihla well and passing Maria’s knowledge forward. She thoughtfully copied vzory (patterns) for me, too. The postal clerk asked me what the package was worth as she read over my customs’ declaration form. The American Express advertisement came to mind: priceless!

          Last week kriva ihla. This week zlate vysivke from Trnava. Life doesn’t get much better than this! And did I mention Pani Maria made dumplings stuffed with prunes in POPPY SEED (my favorite food!!) for my good-bye lunch? I tried to control myself but it was difficult.

          I am so grateful to the wonderfully warm and welcoming Slovak people. Contact me anytime off line if you would like to discuss needlework anytime! - Inez

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Matchett
          Inez, Thanks for the update on your travels in Slovakia in visiting museums and village homes. I appreciate the Slovak words you are including such as vzory,
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 7, 2011
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            Inez, Thanks for the update on your travels in Slovakia in visiting museums and village homes. I appreciate the Slovak words you are including such as vzory, rad, etc. I have fond memories of last summer of you and my daughter studying tambour work in a house in Hrochot. I'd like to visit the museums in Turnava and Skalica some day. It's great that you appreciate the beauty of Slovak embroidery, textiles and artifacts, and are making it more than just a hobby. Julia M.
          • igiles
            Julia, hi! It s good to hear from you. Every once in a while I come across Liz s picture in which she is dressed in Anna s appliqued leather vest and beaded
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 8, 2011
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              Julia, hi! It's good to hear from you. Every once in a while I come across
              Liz's picture in which she is dressed in Anna's appliqued leather vest and
              beaded cepec. She looks very much a princess.



              I smiled when I read your last sentence about my not pursuing needleart
              studies as a hobby. More and more I have been thinking that Slovakia's
              needleartists are, indeed, artists. When we evaluate "fine" art we look at
              composition and elements such as color, design, creativity/inspiration and
              technique. These are the same variables I use when I look at a Piestany
              blouse or a Trencin or Cicmany apron. We're looking at color harmony, motifs
              and their use in the embroidered design. And of course, we look at the
              quality of the embroiderer's technique. Artists use canvas, clay or marble.
              Slovakia's embroiderers (needle artists) used linen or flax ground.



              I see each embroidered textile as an artistic expression of the
              embroiderer's imagination and skill. You're right! I take my embroidery
              studies VERY seriously. <smile> Hope to travel with you again someday. All
              the best - Inez



              From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Matchett
              Sent: Wednesday, September 07, 2011 11:35 PM
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Traveling in Slovakia





              Inez, Thanks for the update on your travels in Slovakia in visiting museums
              and village homes. I appreciate the Slovak words you are including such as
              vzory, rad, etc. I have fond memories of last summer of you and my daughter
              studying tambour work in a house in Hrochot. I'd like to visit the museums
              in Turnava and Skalica some day. It's great that you appreciate the beauty
              of Slovak embroidery, textiles and artifacts, and are making it more than
              just a hobby. Julia M.





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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