Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Surfing in Slovakia

Expand Messages
  • Ron
    Just to add a note that still may be valid (since I returned to the USA in 1997) ... the Europeans referred to an Atlantic effect or American effect on the
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 4, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Just to add a note that still may be valid (since I returned to the USA in 1997) ... the Europeans referred to an "Atlantic effect" or "American effect" on the internet. When people in the USA east coast get up, the world wide web slows down noticeably! Thus they did their heavy duty surfing before the US woke up...

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
      >
      > When do you surf the internet at work?
      >
      > The Slovaks play instead of working the most after they return from their lunch break. According to a recent research, personal use of company internet connections (access to social networks, online shopping) peaks between 1 and 2 p.m. when more half of the internet access time concerns personal use. The percentage drops, but remains high through 3 p.m.
      >
      > About three-quarters of the internet users in Slovakia have public profiles on the net (mostly Facebook) and more than a half of them access it daily. Substantially more Slovak women than men use and access such social networks. About a quarter of the Slovak internet users are not on social networks.
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
    • votrubam
      ... That s long gone, Ron. The internet had 70 million worldwide users then -- ca. 70 percent of them in the US, the cable network with its bandwidth
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 4, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        > in 1997) ... the Europeans referred to an "Atlantic effect" or
        > "American effect" on the internet. When people in the USA east
        > coast get up, the world wide web slows down noticeably! Thus they
        > did their heavy duty surfing before the US woke up...

        That's long gone, Ron. The internet had 70 million worldwide users then -- ca. 70 percent of them in the US, the cable network with its bandwidth saturation reflected that. There are 2 billion internet users now, US users make up barely 14 percent of them.

        Back to Slovakia today: another recent survey noted "lifestyle" differences between the Slovaks' and Americans' use of Facebook. Both the Americans and the Slovaks rush to Facebook on Monday, probably to share what happened during the weekend, but then the Americans' use peaks on Wednesdays and Saturdays, while the Slovaks' on Thursdays and Sundays. At least one Slovak newspaper website notes the same peaks as "Slovak" Facebook.

        What differences between the way of life in Slovakia and the US contribute to the difference?


        Martin
      • Julie Michutka
        ... Well, I haven t been to Slovakia since 2006 (skoda!) so perhaps things have changed. But my guess is, a lot of places are still closed on Sundays in
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 5, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          On Sep 4, 2011, at 10:30 PM, votrubam wrote:

          > Back to Slovakia today: another recent survey noted "lifestyle" differences between the Slovaks' and Americans' use of Facebook. Both the Americans and the Slovaks rush to Facebook on Monday, probably to share what happened during the weekend, but then the Americans' use peaks on Wednesdays and Saturdays, while the Slovaks' on Thursdays and Sundays. At least one Slovak newspaper website notes the same peaks as "Slovak" Facebook.

          Well, I haven't been to Slovakia since 2006 (skoda!) so perhaps things have changed. But my guess is, a lot of places are still closed on Sundays in Slovakia. so, Slovaks who have home access to the internet have time to surf. We've lost that quiet day; stores in America are open 7 days a week, kids' soccer matches are now being scheduled on Sundays, etc. I don't know how to account for the Wed/Thurs difference; we used to have one weekday afternoon when almost everything would shut down (no longer, of course!), would Slovakia have something like that? still?

          I was bored by quiet Sundays and quiet Wednesday afternoons (that was the half-day off in my town) when I was a kid. Now I miss them.

          Julie Michutka
          jmm@...

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Helen Fedor
          Could it be that Americans are online Wednesday and Saturday making plans for Thursday(?, or Friday) and Sunday, and Slovaks are sharing what they did on
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 6, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Could it be that Americans are online Wednesday and Saturday making plans for Thursday(?, or Friday) and Sunday, and Slovaks are sharing what they did on Thursday (again, ?) and Sunday?

            H




            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            From: jmm@...
            Date: Mon, 5 Sep 2011 23:40:53 -0400
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Surfing in Slovakia






            On Sep 4, 2011, at 10:30 PM, votrubam wrote:

            > Back to Slovakia today: another recent survey noted "lifestyle" differences between the Slovaks' and Americans' use of Facebook. Both the Americans and the Slovaks rush to Facebook on Monday, probably to share what happened during the weekend, but then the Americans' use peaks on Wednesdays and Saturdays, while the Slovaks' on Thursdays and Sundays. At least one Slovak newspaper website notes the same peaks as "Slovak" Facebook.

            Well, I haven't been to Slovakia since 2006 (skoda!) so perhaps things have changed. But my guess is, a lot of places are still closed on Sundays in Slovakia. so, Slovaks who have home access to the internet have time to surf. We've lost that quiet day; stores in America are open 7 days a week, kids' soccer matches are now being scheduled on Sundays, etc. I don't know how to account for the Wed/Thurs difference; we used to have one weekday afternoon when almost everything would shut down (no longer, of course!), would Slovakia have something like that? still?

            I was bored by quiet Sundays and quiet Wednesday afternoons (that was the half-day off in my town) when I was a kid. Now I miss them.

            Julie Michutka
            jmm@...

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • votrubam
            ... ?? If it were, the question would remain why those differences, why would more Americans than Slovaks make plans for Thursday and why would more Slovaks
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 6, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              > Could it be that Americans are online Wednesday and Saturday
              > making plans for Thursday(?, or Friday) and Sunday, and Slovaks
              > are sharing what they did on Thursday (again, ?) and Sunday?

              ?? If it were, the question would remain why those differences, why would more Americans than Slovaks make plans for Thursday and why would more Slovaks share...

              The weekend peaks seem to be meaningfully explained by the difference in retail business hours and perhaps also by the Americans' more frequent Sunday churchgoing (followed by mall-and-lunch-out-going) and the Slovaks' surviving Saturday home cleaning (in addition to Saturday shopping), which has largely disappeared in the US according to surveys.

              As to the US peaks on Wednesday and SK on Thursday -- on the one hand, we don't know how strong those peaks are, meaning, say, the US Wednesday peak may not be significantly different from the Americans' internet access on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

              The Slovak peak on Thursdays might partly have something to do with the Slovaks knocking off early on Friday, so they may be more busy doing whatever they need to do at work while they're there on Friday and then turn the computer off and go home (from where their access is more limited), so some of the potential Friday posts get shifted to Thursdays.


              Martin
            • Ben Sorensen
              Martin, Though the difference in store hours and churchgoing would explain some of the Slovak peaks on a Sunday, I am thinking that there is also a cultural
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 7, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Martin,

                Though the difference in store hours and churchgoing would explain some of the Slovak peaks on a Sunday, I am thinking that there is also a cultural difference that comes into play on that: in Slovakia, doing any kind of "work" on a Sunday is met with derision.  Even yard work on a Sunday brings unkind glances from the neighbors, and I remember often being told, as I would start a project then, that "you shouldn't be doing that on a Sunday; the neighbors will not be pleased!"  It was a concept that I had a hard time adjusting to, but once I also stopped working on Sundays, I realized that my inner procrastinator was coddled for one day. :-) Talk about inner peace!

                Ben


                ________________________________
                From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, September 6, 2011 9:03 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Surfing in Slovakia


                 
                > Could it be that Americans are online Wednesday and Saturday
                > making plans for Thursday(?, or Friday) and Sunday, and Slovaks
                > are sharing what they did on Thursday (again, ?) and Sunday?

                ?? If it were, the question would remain why those differences, why would more Americans than Slovaks make plans for Thursday and why would more Slovaks share...

                The weekend peaks seem to be meaningfully explained by the difference in retail business hours and perhaps also by the Americans' more frequent Sunday churchgoing (followed by mall-and-lunch-out-going) and the Slovaks' surviving Saturday home cleaning (in addition to Saturday shopping), which has largely disappeared in the US according to surveys.

                As to the US peaks on Wednesday and SK on Thursday -- on the one hand, we don't know how strong those peaks are, meaning, say, the US Wednesday peak may not be significantly different from the Americans' internet access on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

                The Slovak peak on Thursdays might partly have something to do with the Slovaks knocking off early on Friday, so they may be more busy doing whatever they need to do at work while they're there on Friday and then turn the computer off and go home (from where their access is more limited), so some of the potential Friday posts get shifted to Thursdays.

                Martin




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • votrubam
                ... Perhaps. Do you know of any survey that suggests/confirms that? Individual experiences may not represent Slovakia in general. For instance, this is the
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 7, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  > doing any kind of "work" on a Sunday is met with derision.

                  Perhaps. Do you know of any survey that suggests/confirms that? Individual experiences may not represent Slovakia in general. For instance, this is the first time I hear of it being the case in Slovakia (and I know you know what you're talking about concerning the people you associate with), while I'm familiar with the no-work-on-Sunday/Sabbath culture adhered to by some in Bavaria and the U.S. But I don't know of any overall survey into this anywhere.

                  That could be part of it if the "deriding" Slovaks are also a significant segment of Facebook users in the country.


                  Martin
                • Ben Sorensen
                  Hi Martin, I do not... I know that what I wrote represents Hozelec. :-P But then, I have always been stunned by how religious the secular USA is compared to
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 7, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Martin,
                    I do not... I know that what I wrote represents Hozelec. :-P But then, I have always been stunned by how religious the secular USA is compared to "Catholic" Slovakia; so the two experiences are incongruous at best. 

                    By the way, the hockey player Pavol Demitra just passed away- he was on board a Russian airplane with his Russian club team Lokomotiv Jaroslavl' that just wrecked.  There were some other big names, but his is the only Slovak name on board.
                    Ben


                    ________________________________
                    From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 9:56 AM
                    Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Surfing in Slovakia


                     
                    > doing any kind of "work" on a Sunday is met with derision.

                    Perhaps. Do you know of any survey that suggests/confirms that? Individual experiences may not represent Slovakia in general. For instance, this is the first time I hear of it being the case in Slovakia (and I know you know what you're talking about concerning the people you associate with), while I'm familiar with the no-work-on-Sunday/Sabbath culture adhered to by some in Bavaria and the U.S. But I don't know of any overall survey into this anywhere.

                    That could be part of it if the "deriding" Slovaks are also a significant segment of Facebook users in the country.

                    Martin




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • votrubam
                    Thanks, Ben. Even if we re not sure of the extent, what you said is valuable and worth keeping in mind as one of the factors that may contribute to the
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 7, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thanks, Ben. Even if we're not sure of the extent, what you said is valuable and worth keeping in mind as one of the factors that may contribute to the "Facebook cultural difference" between the U.S. and Slovakia.


                      > how religious the secular USA is compared to "Catholic" Slovakia

                      Yes, there was international research into religiosity (as opposed to a registered or declared religious affiliation) a number of years ago, both the U.S. and Slovakia were included. It detected a world-wide pattern showing a link between a nation's per-capita purchasing power and religiosity -- the more of the former, the less of the latter.

                      There was one significant exception to that pattern: the U.S., where religiosity is at the level of Mexico (and higher than in Slovakia), while the Americans' purchasing power is among the highest in the world.


                      Martin
                    • William C. Wormuth
                      Ahoj Martin and Ben When I was very young, all stores here in Johnstown, New York and area surrounding were closed.  Rules changed because men and women
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 7, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Ahoj Martin and Ben


                        When I was very young, all stores here in Johnstown, New York and area surrounding were closed.  Rules changed because men and women worked 5 days a week and needed to shop on Sundays. 

                        Most stores close at 6:00PM on Sunday.

                        To Date, alcohol can not be purchased until after 11:00AM on Sunday


                        Z Bohom,

                        Vilko



                        ________________________________
                        From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, September 7, 2011 3:48 PM
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Surfing in Slovakia


                         
                        Thanks, Ben. Even if we're not sure of the extent, what you said is valuable and worth keeping in mind as one of the factors that may contribute to the "Facebook cultural difference" between the U.S. and Slovakia.

                        > how religious the secular USA is compared to "Catholic" Slovakia

                        Yes, there was international research into religiosity (as opposed to a registered or declared religious affiliation) a number of years ago, both the U.S. and Slovakia were included. It detected a world-wide pattern showing a link between a nation's per-capita purchasing power and religiosity -- the more of the former, the less of the latter.

                        There was one significant exception to that pattern: the U.S., where religiosity is at the level of Mexico (and higher than in Slovakia), while the Americans' purchasing power is among the highest in the world.

                        Martin




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.