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Re: Questions on a few Slovak dishes

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  • allanstevo
    Ben, 1. Factory made mayonnaise based salad containing about 30% pickled fish and 2. spaghetti covered in powdered sugar and poppy seeds These aren t the usual
    Message 1 of 26 , Jun 28, 2011
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      Ben,

      1. Factory made mayonnaise based salad containing about 30% pickled fish

      and

      2. spaghetti covered in powdered sugar and poppy seeds

      These aren't the usual first two things a person asks about when he asks about Slovak cooking. I think asking about those two foods was atypical and made me curious to hear more about Simon. Simon himself pointed out that rezance s makom was unlike anything he'd ever encountered before.

      I wonder if he's a reporter working on an article about "unique foods in Slovakia" or maybe even a romantic looking to make a few of the foods that his Slovak wife is homesick for.

      The foreigners I've met who know these two foods know them because they've tasted them. I think every Slovak in Slovakia has probably tasted each of them. It's unusual to have heard of these foods, but never to have tasted them. I agree, for a Slovak these foods are not at all strange. I guess what was strange for me was that Simon had never tasted them but clearly had heard of them. It made me interested to learn more about Simon.

      Allan
      www.52inSk.com


      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have been extremely busy, but was just reading through these:
      >
      > Treska as a peculiar food? I would say that it is no more peculiar than deviled ham, deviled eggs, or a tuna spread.  I wonder if you find biscuits and butter rolls to be the American equivalent to saltines-- a rohlik is a roll, made of about the same stuff as an Italian or French bread at Wal-mart.  White bread as a rule is bad for ya, but people in America and Slovakia still eat it, and a rozok with butter and salt (or s~malec! YUM!) is sinfully simple and delicious.  If you get them in the morning, they are usually still warm and fresh. . .
      >
      >   Treska is not my favorite food, by any means... but when I am thinking of Slovakia, it comes to mind.  It is usually bought pre-made at the local market, and is bought in quantity, so seeing it listed as a "strange" food caught my eye.  In fact, all the dishes here are so common in Slovakia, I am having a hard time seeing anything strange about them.  
      >
      > Strange would be an American hot-dog in Slovakia. With chili and nacho cheese. :-) Or buffalo wings in Slovakia. THAT would be odd. Or biftek in an American restaurant. . . which would probably get the FDA out in a jiffy: http://www.gurman.sk/recept-tatarske-bifteky-AAA2944/%c3%82%c2%a0(Use google translate, and notice that they don't mention cooking this... cuz ya don't!)
      > Ben
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: allanstevo <allanstevo@...>
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 2:22 PM
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Questions on a few Slovak dishes
      >
      >
      >  
      > Simon,
      > I'm very curious to learn more about you, because you picked some strange dishes. Please, may we hear more about your interest in these particular foods?
      >
      > 1. Treska take a lot of getting used to. It's made as you've described and is eaten on/with a rozok. I consider a rozok to be the Slovak equivalent of a saltine â€" tasteless and nutritionless and made from scraps of bread refuse. However, a difference between a saltine is that it is a staple food for many people. The main taste in treska is pickled herring. The main texture in good treska is pickled herring. That means the thing to do with treska is to make sure you have a pickled herring you like before you begin making it. After writing the above in which I sort of badmouth treska and rozok (rozky plural in Slovak) I am getting a little hungry for the two of them. A few months ago, I wanted to do something nice for a friend. His only request was that I bring him half a kilo of treska and 20 rozky and that we sit and have lunch together. The rozky are usually dipped into the herring and sort of scooped out and then both are eaten in one bite.
      >
      > 2. I can't help with the fish recipes. I advise you to stick the following words into google with fish. Pecene, opekane, nakladana, dusena, and then use google translate. Halasle is a Hungarian stew made from fish that is so widely appreciated in Slovakia that I would call it a Slovak food. You probably had a hard time finding recipes that didn't call for frying in bread crumbs because frying is a very common method of cooking fish in Slovakia.
      >
      > 3. Rezance s makom is delicious, but also takes some getting used to. My foreign friends in Slovakia lament when "sweet lunches" are served to them at the cafeteria at work. Like Lubos said, soup is eaten first, then poppy seed (sometimes with a simple plate of buttered spaghetti) is served and then lots of sugar is sprinkled on top. If you like poppy seed it can be quite a tasty meal. Rezance are harder to come by because they are more work, but rezance are a typical doughy Slovak food.
      >
      > 4. Palacinky fillings that I eat the most are as follows â€" homemade jam, nutella, nutella and sliced bananas, nutella and sliced kiwi (currently a popular fruit in Slovakia), lemon and powdered sugar, apples grated fried lightly in butter with sugar and cinnamon, poppy seed filling, and ground walnut filling. Sometimes whip cream is served on the side, sometimes chocolate syrup is drizzled on top. Sometimes they are rolled. Sometimes they are folded.
      >
      > Let me know if I can be of service in any other way.
      >
      > Allan Stevo
      > www.52inSk.com
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Simon,
      > >
      > > I am the guy who runs slovakcooking.com. Rezance s makom is something my grandma prepares quite regularly. In Slovakia, it is fairly common to have sweet main dishes. This is something that I have yet to see in the US. Dishes such as these poppy seed noodles, steamed dumplings filled with jam, plum dumplings, or bread pudding (zemlovka) are a completely normal main course. They would typically follow some soup first course.
      > >
      > > As far as proper amounts, there really isn't such a thing. Much of Slovak cooking is done by taste, feel, and touch. Basically mix ground poppy seeds with enough sugar to make them sweet to your liking, add some melted butter to make it creamier and that's it. One caveat, you need ground poppy seeds. In Slovakia, you find ground and whole poppy seeds in every grocery store. Here in the US there seems to be some crusade against them, so you typically have to special order whole poppy seeds and then grind them yourself. You can alternatively try the Solo poppy seed filling, however I don't like. It's too sweet for my taste, and the #1 ingredient in it is high-fructose corn syrup. I prefer to stick to whole foods...
      > >
      > > -- Lubos Brieda --
      > > Scientific computing: www.particleincell.comSlovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com 
      > >
      > > --- On Thu, 6/23/11, Simon Bao <simonbaowow@> wrote:
      > >
      > > From: Simon Bao <simonbaowow@>
      > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Questions on a few Slovak dishes
      > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Thursday, June 23, 2011, 12:44 PM
      > >
      > > Are there any foodies in the group who can take a moment and answer a few questions about some Slovak dishes I am interested in? 
      > >
      > > First, there is a recipe for Cod Salad, Treska v Majoneze.  It looks unusually plain.  The recipe calls for some onion and carrot, some mayo and mustard, but no herbs of any kind.  Is the recipe sound and reasonably authentic?  And how is that salad served and eaten - is it a Slovak equivalent of American tuna salad, or is it meant to be served as a kind of appetizer?
      > >
      > > The only recipes for a fish or seafood entree I found are for Vyprazana Ryba, simple breaded and fried fish.  I understand that in Slovakia one would use freshwater fish and there wouldn't be a huge repertoire of fish recipes, but I am guessing that there are other Slovak preparations for fish beyond just frying it.  Are there some Slovak fish dishes I should seek out by name?
      > >
      > > While searching around I came across a description of Rezance s Makom, Poppy Seed Noodles ( http://www.slovakcooking.com/2010/recipes/pasta/poppy-seed-noodles/%c3%82%c2%a0 ).  It's not like any dish I've eaten before and I'd like to try it.  Does anyone know where I can find a proper recipe for that, a recipe with quantities indicated?  And can anyone tell me when and how a dish like that would be served and eaten?
      > >
      > > I've seen descriptions of Palacinky that compare them to crepes, and then mention that Palacinky can have all kinds of filings.  But I'd like a bit more information, such as recipes for Slovak fillings for those Palacinky.  Does anyone know where I might locate recipes?
      > >
      > > Thanks to anyone who can lend me a hand and some information.  -simon
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • allanstevo
      Martin, Thank you for the correction on that one. Whatever treska means, it tastes like pickled herring. Whatever is sold as pickled herring in the U.S. (maybe
      Message 2 of 26 , Jun 28, 2011
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        Martin,
        Thank you for the correction on that one. Whatever treska means, it tastes like pickled herring.

        Whatever is sold as pickled herring in the U.S. (maybe it is mislabeled) gets sold as pickled treska (maybe its mislabeled) in Slovakia. I witnessed this translation most recently on Thursday when I tried to convince a friend to buy a jar of pickled treska at Tesco. It looks and tastes like pickled herring from the U.S.

        Good treska salad here tastes just like pickled herring in the U.S. Bad treska salad tastes like low-grade mayonnaise with a fishy taint to it.

        I believe herring is a small and more delicate fish and cod a larger rougher fish, so I don't know why the two seem so similar in the foods that I eat. I wonder if the translations are not correct in the grocery store or I wonder if maybe the fish is so heavily processed that the difference in their meat is no longer noticeable by the time I eat it.

        I'll question the fishmonger about this a little more the next time I go to the market.

        Allan
        www.52inSk.com





        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
        >
        > > The main taste in treska is pickled herring
        >
        > But _treska_ is "cod" in English. That is the fish ingredient in tresc~i' s~ala't, which is commonly abbreviated to just _treska_, but that does not remove the basic meaning of the word and of what fish the mayo-and-sour-cream-based salad includes.
        >
        > "Herring" is _haring_ in Slovak (usually in the plural: haringy).
        >
        >
        > Martin
        >
      • Simon Bao
        Well, I m certainly not a reporter - and I think reporters are supposed to identify themselves when they re working on a story, anyway. I *am* very much a
        Message 3 of 26 , Jun 28, 2011
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          Well, I'm certainly not a reporter - and I think reporters are supposed to identify themselves when they're working on a story, anyway.

          I *am* very much a romantic, but I have no Slovak wife or Slovak significant others.

          But from time to time I do like to cook a multi-course dinner in an ethnic cuisine I know little about.   In the midst of researching a cuisine and its dishes, one invariably ends up learning some history, learning a bit more about a land and its culture and people.

          The challenge usually isn't the cooking the unfamiliar dishes, or locating the ingredients, or in choosing courses to accompany one another - the challenge is locating complete, well-written, "tried & true" recipes.

          There are lots of Slovak dishes I didn't ask about, because I quickly found more than enough information and recipes - or they don't appeal to me.

          With regard to the Treska, I'm not interested in any factory-made product, I simply saw it described in a few places and wanted more information about it and what folks put in it - in part, I wanted to see if it is the kind of dish that can, with a bit of upgrading, be turned into a smart and appealing appetizer, perhaps a kind of Treska mousse.  (Probably not).

          The pasta with heaps 'o' sugar and poppy seeds, served in the midst of a savory meal, well that's just such an outstanding oddity, such an outlier among European dishes, I can't NOT ask for more information about that one.




          --- On Tue, 6/28/11, allanstevo <allanstevo@...> wrote:

          From: allanstevo <allanstevo@...>
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Questions on a few Slovak dishes
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, June 28, 2011, 4:42 AM
















           









          Ben,



          1. Factory made mayonnaise based salad containing about 30% pickled fish



          and



          2. spaghetti covered in powdered sugar and poppy seeds



          These aren't the usual first two things a person asks about when he asks about Slovak cooking. I think asking about those two foods was atypical and made me curious to hear more about Simon. Simon himself pointed out that rezance s makom was unlike anything he'd ever encountered before.



          I wonder if he's a reporter working on an article about "unique foods in Slovakia" or maybe even a romantic looking to make a few of the foods that his Slovak wife is homesick for.



          The foreigners I've met who know these two foods know them because they've tasted them. I think every Slovak in Slovakia has probably tasted each of them. It's unusual to have heard of these foods, but never to have tasted them. I agree, for a Slovak these foods are not at all strange. I guess what was strange for me was that Simon had never tasted them but clearly had heard of them. It made me interested to learn more about Simon.



          Allan

          www.52inSk.com



          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:

          >

          > I have been extremely busy, but was just reading through these:

          >

          > Treska as a peculiar food? I would say that it is no more peculiar than deviled ham, deviled eggs, or a tuna spread.  I wonder if you find biscuits and butter rolls to be the American equivalent to saltines-- a rohlik is a roll, made of about the same stuff as an Italian or French bread at Wal-mart.  White bread as a rule is bad for ya, but people in America and Slovakia still eat it, and a rozok with butter and salt (or s~malec! YUM!) is sinfully simple and delicious.  If you get them in the morning, they are usually still warm and fresh. . .

          >

          >   Treska is not my favorite food, by any means... but when I am thinking of Slovakia, it comes to mind.  It is usually bought pre-made at the local market, and is bought in quantity, so seeing it listed as a "strange" food caught my eye.  In fact, all the dishes here are so common in Slovakia, I am having a hard time seeing anything strange about them.  

          >

          > Strange would be an American hot-dog in Slovakia. With chili and nacho cheese. :-) Or buffalo wings in Slovakia. THAT would be odd. Or biftek in an American restaurant. . . which would probably get the FDA out in a jiffy: http://www.gurman.sk/recept-tatarske-bifteky-AAA2944/%c3%82%c2%a0(Use google translate, and notice that they don't mention cooking this... cuz ya don't!)

          > Ben

          >

          >

          >

          >

          >

          >

          > ________________________________

          > From: allanstevo <allanstevo@...>

          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

          > Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 2:22 PM

          > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Questions on a few Slovak dishes

          >

          >

          >  

          > Simon,

          > I'm very curious to learn more about you, because you picked some strange dishes. Please, may we hear more about your interest in these particular foods?

          >

          > 1. Treska take a lot of getting used to. It's made as you've described and is eaten on/with a rozok. I consider a rozok to be the Slovak equivalent of a saltine â€" tasteless and nutritionless and made from scraps of bread refuse. However, a difference between a saltine is that it is a staple food for many people. The main taste in treska is pickled herring. The main texture in good treska is pickled herring. That means the thing to do with treska is to make sure you have a pickled herring you like before you begin making it. After writing the above in which I sort of badmouth treska and rozok (rozky plural in Slovak) I am getting a little hungry for the two of them. A few months ago, I wanted to do something nice for a friend. His only request was that I bring him half a kilo of treska and 20 rozky and that we sit and have lunch together. The rozky are usually dipped into the herring and sort of scooped out and then both are eaten in one
          bite.

          >

          > 2. I can't help with the fish recipes. I advise you to stick the following words into google with fish. Pecene, opekane, nakladana, dusena, and then use google translate. Halasle is a Hungarian stew made from fish that is so widely appreciated in Slovakia that I would call it a Slovak food. You probably had a hard time finding recipes that didn't call for frying in bread crumbs because frying is a very common method of cooking fish in Slovakia.

          >

          > 3. Rezance s makom is delicious, but also takes some getting used to. My foreign friends in Slovakia lament when "sweet lunches" are served to them at the cafeteria at work. Like Lubos said, soup is eaten first, then poppy seed (sometimes with a simple plate of buttered spaghetti) is served and then lots of sugar is sprinkled on top. If you like poppy seed it can be quite a tasty meal. Rezance are harder to come by because they are more work, but rezance are a typical doughy Slovak food.

          >

          > 4. Palacinky fillings that I eat the most are as follows â€" homemade jam, nutella, nutella and sliced bananas, nutella and sliced kiwi (currently a popular fruit in Slovakia), lemon and powdered sugar, apples grated fried lightly in butter with sugar and cinnamon, poppy seed filling, and ground walnut filling. Sometimes whip cream is served on the side, sometimes chocolate syrup is drizzled on top. Sometimes they are rolled. Sometimes they are folded.

          >

          > Let me know if I can be of service in any other way.

          >

          > Allan Stevo

          > www.52inSk.com

          >

          > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@> wrote:

          > >

          > > Hi Simon,

          > >

          > > I am the guy who runs slovakcooking.com. Rezance s makom is something my grandma prepares quite regularly. In Slovakia, it is fairly common to have sweet main dishes. This is something that I have yet to see in the US. Dishes such as these poppy seed noodles, steamed dumplings filled with jam, plum dumplings, or bread pudding (zemlovka) are a completely normal main course. They would typically follow some soup first course.

          > >

          > > As far as proper amounts, there really isn't such a thing. Much of Slovak cooking is done by taste, feel, and touch. Basically mix ground poppy seeds with enough sugar to make them sweet to your liking, add some melted butter to make it creamier and that's it. One caveat, you need ground poppy seeds. In Slovakia, you find ground and whole poppy seeds in every grocery store. Here in the US there seems to be some crusade against them, so you typically have to special order whole poppy seeds and then grind them yourself. You can alternatively try the Solo poppy seed filling, however I don't like. It's too sweet for my taste, and the #1 ingredient in it is high-fructose corn syrup. I prefer to stick to whole foods...

          > >

          > > -- Lubos Brieda --

          > > Scientific computing: www.particleincell.comSlovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com 

          > >

          > > --- On Thu, 6/23/11, Simon Bao <simonbaowow@> wrote:

          > >

          > > From: Simon Bao <simonbaowow@>

          > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Questions on a few Slovak dishes

          > > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

          > > Date: Thursday, June 23, 2011, 12:44 PM

          > >

          > > Are there any foodies in the group who can take a moment and answer a few questions about some Slovak dishes I am interested in? 

          > >

          > > First, there is a recipe for Cod Salad, Treska v Majoneze.  It looks unusually plain.  The recipe calls for some onion and carrot, some mayo and mustard, but no herbs of any kind.  Is the recipe sound and reasonably authentic?  And how is that salad served and eaten - is it a Slovak equivalent of American tuna salad, or is it meant to be served as a kind of appetizer?

          > >

          > > The only recipes for a fish or seafood entree I found are for Vyprazana Ryba, simple breaded and fried fish.  I understand that in Slovakia one would use freshwater fish and there wouldn't be a huge repertoire of fish recipes, but I am guessing that there are other Slovak preparations for fish beyond just frying it.  Are there some Slovak fish dishes I should seek out by name?

          > >

          > > While searching around I came across a description of Rezance s Makom, Poppy Seed Noodles ( http://www.slovakcooking.com/2010/recipes/pasta/poppy-seed-noodles/%c3%82%c2%a0 ).  It's not like any dish I've eaten before and I'd like to try it.  Does anyone know where I can find a proper recipe for that, a recipe with quantities indicated?  And can anyone tell me when and how a dish like that would be served and eaten?

          > >

          > > I've seen descriptions of Palacinky that compare them to crepes, and then mention that Palacinky can have all kinds of filings.  But I'd like a bit more information, such as recipes for Slovak fillings for those Palacinky.  Does anyone know where I might locate recipes?

          > >

          > > Thanks to anyone who can lend me a hand and some information.  -simon

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > > ------------------------------------

          > >

          > > Yahoo! Groups Links

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > >

          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          > >

          >

          >

          >

          >

          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          >



























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