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Dialects

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  • votrubam
    ... There s a difference. Only the first two arrived in the 20th century, while the verb _papat_, also _papkat_ is old. It is a word used when talking to
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 20, 2011
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      > The use of the greeting "ahoj [ah-hoee]" and the European
      > "c~au", [chow], and 'papat [pah-paht], (for eat)

      There's a difference. Only the first two arrived in the 20th century, while the verb _papat_, also _papkat_ is old. It is a word used when talking to babies, unexpected among adults, it ends up being quite expressive then (cutesy, funny, conceited, etc.).


      > word I heard more in the east is "s~umne"

      Yes, Helene, that's an East Slovak word, not common elsewhere.


      > "hen to"

      That's common all over Slovakia. It's a colloquial version of "the one/thing over there." It's a combination of hen- and the neuter pronoun _to_ in this instance. The colloquial hen- works with other pronouns too, e.g., henten, henti, etc. (e.g., Vidis hentu horu? "Can you see the mountain over there?") and also with tam, "there": hentam, "over there."


      > what sounded like Zetzi for deti.

      Indeed, Helene, they said [dzetsi]. Some South-West Slovak and all East Slovak dialects pronounce the "soft" (palatal) -t~- as [ts] and the "soft" (palatal) -d~- as [dz]. That's one of the most recognizable East Slovak features for other Slovaks.


      Martin
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