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Slovak Maps

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  • Diana Boggs
    The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either physically too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to clearly print.
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
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      The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either physically too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to clearly print. There are printable maps but they too are usually too small to be of benefit for a great display. I have tried to do something similar to your embroidery project with a mapped display of olde world/new world Greater Hungary. At that time, I didn't know about the camera trick for printing up large projects & got stuck paying for maps that I could not effectively use. With my 14 megapixel camera, I can produce a great photo as large as the side of a building. (LOL)

      This particular project or displays needs to have a larger (sized) map to work effectively as a display. You cannot make a photo or map larger to the size needed without pixiating the map out of focus & looking obtuse. Smaller, yes. Larger, never.

      Many Internet maps of a size that can be used for a display are individually copyrighted, unlike a copyrighted book that contains maps, where individuals may legally (fair use) use by quoting page, book and author so long as it is not a commercial project.

      There are several options for the embroidery crew. The option to take depends on that person's available time & toys...printer, scanner, camera and photoshop(including amateur photoshops). Many amateur photoshops that come with printer/scanner software can be effectively used. There are plenty of tutorials on youtube.

      I am listing options in "my" order of preference for the best resolution. For me, displays are all about presentation. But when all else fails guerilla/gorilla wrestle until you get what you want. Maps are a lot of fun to work with.

      1. Do it in photoshop where size of display is presized to desired size. However you still need a physically sized large map. If you cut out the guts of the map and then enlarge just the map outline and then clean up the outline, you can make a smaller map "work". This way your project should look the most professional, but will also take the most time. Tools needed are photoshop.
      2. Scan printed map at high dpi(300) so size is physically larger. However you are still limited to how big you can make a 300dpi scan and might not be able to get as big as you want. Some scanners refuse to scan maps at 300dpi. It is usually better to scan instead of photograph, but maps get hinky when scanned if you need a larger size than the scan provides. Tools needed are printer, scanner and photoshop. Results are professional looking. This method takes up more time than option 1.
      3. Photograph map in book or printed at high dpi. A 5 megapixel camera used with a tripod or something to steady camera will produce a photo approximately 28inches on one side and 32 inches on the other side. If you focus in on the map so you don't have to crop then you have accomplished your goal for a large map very simply. Your cost will be for the actual display that measures as large as needed, usually about $20.. This option takes the least amount of time and can be done at any kinko or library with a computer center. Tools needed are a megapixel camera and minor photoshopping.

      Another option & the easiest is to just copy/xerox a map that you like in regular size, then print up as many copies as you need. You could insert the various embroidery styles from the appropriate locales. That way everyone in your embroidery club would have a copy to keep with them.
       
      Since you are doing a private, non-commercial project there should not be copyright concerns. If you are still concerned then do as I suggested earlier about removing extraneous text/graphics with photoshop. So long as there is at least a 15 percent change to a graphic, you are good to go. Even if someone drags you all the way to the courthouse, they will lose...dlb




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lubos Brieda
      Here is one for $10. http://www.canstockphoto.com/slovakia-map-black-and-white-mercator-4256546.html What you need is vector graphics, which can be resized to
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
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        Here is one for
        $10. http://www.canstockphoto.com/slovakia-map-black-and-white-mercator-4256546.html


        What you need is vector graphics, which can be resized to any size without
        losing resolution.
        -- Lubos Brieda --

        Feast like at grandma's: www.slovakcooking.com
        Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com





        ________________________________
        From: Diana Boggs <smudsville@...>
        To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, February 7, 2011 4:54:30 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps

        The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either physically
        too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to clearly print.
        There are printable maps but they too are usually too small to be of benefit for
        a great display. I have tried to do something similar to your embroidery project
        with a mapped display of olde world/new world Greater Hungary. At that time, I
        didn't know about the camera trick for printing up large projects & got stuck
        paying for maps that I could not effectively use. With my 14 megapixel camera, I
        can produce a great photo as large as the side of a building. (LOL)


        This particular project or displays needs to have a larger (sized) map to work
        effectively as a display. You cannot make a photo or map larger to the size
        needed without pixiating the map out of focus & looking obtuse. Smaller, yes.
        Larger, never.

        Many Internet maps of a size that can be used for a display are individually
        copyrighted, unlike a copyrighted book that contains maps, where individuals may
        legally (fair use) use by quoting page, book and author so long as it is not a
        commercial project.

        There are several options for the embroidery crew. The option to take depends on
        that person's available time & toys...printer, scanner, camera and
        photoshop(including amateur photoshops). Many amateur photoshops that come with
        printer/scanner software can be effectively used. There are plenty of tutorials
        on youtube.

        I am listing options in "my" order of preference for the best resolution. For
        me, displays are all about presentation. But when all else fails
        guerilla/gorilla wrestle until you get what you want. Maps are a lot of fun to
        work with.


        1. Do it in photoshop where size of display is presized to desired size. However
        you still need a physically sized large map. If you cut out the guts of the map
        and then enlarge just the map outline and then clean up the outline, you can
        make a smaller map "work". This way your project should look the most
        professional, but will also take the most time. Tools needed are photoshop.
        2. Scan printed map at high dpi(300) so size is physically larger. However you
        are still limited to how big you can make a 300dpi scan and might not be able to
        get as big as you want. Some scanners refuse to scan maps at 300dpi. It is
        usually better to scan instead of photograph, but maps get hinky when scanned if
        you need a larger size than the scan provides. Tools needed are printer, scanner
        and photoshop. Results are professional looking. This method takes up more time
        than option 1.
        3. Photograph map in book or printed at high dpi. A 5 megapixel camera used with
        a tripod or something to steady camera will produce a photo approximately
        28inches on one side and 32 inches on the other side. If you focus in on the map
        so you don't have to crop then you have accomplished your goal for a large map
        very simply. Your cost will be for the actual display that measures as large as
        needed, usually about $20.. This option takes the least amount of time and can
        be done at any kinko or library with a computer center. Tools needed are a
        megapixel camera and minor photoshopping.

        Another option & the easiest is to just copy/xerox a map that you like in
        regular size, then print up as many copies as you need. You could insert the
        various embroidery styles from the appropriate locales. That way everyone in
        your embroidery club would have a copy to keep with them.

        Since you are doing a private, non-commercial project there should not be
        copyright concerns. If you are still concerned then do as I suggested earlier
        about removing extraneous text/graphics with photoshop. So long as there is at
        least a 15 percent change to a graphic, you are good to go. Even if someone
        drags you all the way to the courthouse, they will lose...dlb




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lubos Brieda
        I forgot. To work with vector graphics files, you can use free program called inkscape. http://www.inkscape.org/. It s great! -- Lubos Brieda -- Feast like at
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
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          I forgot. To work with vector graphics files, you can use free program called
          inkscape. http://www.inkscape.org/. It's great!
          -- Lubos Brieda --

          Feast like at grandma's: www.slovakcooking.com
          Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com





          ________________________________
          From: Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, February 7, 2011 8:03:48 AM
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps

          Here is one for
          $10.
          http://www.canstockphoto.com/slovakia-map-black-and-white-mercator-4256546.html


          What you need is vector graphics, which can be resized to any size without
          losing resolution.
          -- Lubos Brieda --

          Feast like at grandma's: www.slovakcooking.com
          Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com





          ________________________________
          From: Diana Boggs <smudsville@...>
          To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, February 7, 2011 4:54:30 AM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps

          The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either physically
          too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to clearly print.

          There are printable maps but they too are usually too small to be of benefit for

          a great display. I have tried to do something similar to your embroidery project

          with a mapped display of olde world/new world Greater Hungary. At that time, I
          didn't know about the camera trick for printing up large projects & got stuck
          paying for maps that I could not effectively use. With my 14 megapixel camera, I

          can produce a great photo as large as the side of a building. (LOL)


          This particular project or displays needs to have a larger (sized) map to work
          effectively as a display. You cannot make a photo or map larger to the size
          needed without pixiating the map out of focus & looking obtuse. Smaller, yes.
          Larger, never.

          Many Internet maps of a size that can be used for a display are individually
          copyrighted, unlike a copyrighted book that contains maps, where individuals may

          legally (fair use) use by quoting page, book and author so long as it is not a
          commercial project.

          There are several options for the embroidery crew. The option to take depends on

          that person's available time & toys...printer, scanner, camera and
          photoshop(including amateur photoshops). Many amateur photoshops that come with
          printer/scanner software can be effectively used. There are plenty of tutorials
          on youtube.

          I am listing options in "my" order of preference for the best resolution. For
          me, displays are all about presentation. But when all else fails
          guerilla/gorilla wrestle until you get what you want. Maps are a lot of fun to
          work with.


          1. Do it in photoshop where size of display is presized to desired size. However

          you still need a physically sized large map. If you cut out the guts of the map
          and then enlarge just the map outline and then clean up the outline, you can
          make a smaller map "work". This way your project should look the most
          professional, but will also take the most time. Tools needed are photoshop.
          2. Scan printed map at high dpi(300) so size is physically larger. However you
          are still limited to how big you can make a 300dpi scan and might not be able to

          get as big as you want. Some scanners refuse to scan maps at 300dpi. It is
          usually better to scan instead of photograph, but maps get hinky when scanned if

          you need a larger size than the scan provides. Tools needed are printer, scanner

          and photoshop. Results are professional looking. This method takes up more time
          than option 1.
          3. Photograph map in book or printed at high dpi. A 5 megapixel camera used with

          a tripod or something to steady camera will produce a photo approximately
          28inches on one side and 32 inches on the other side. If you focus in on the map

          so you don't have to crop then you have accomplished your goal for a large map
          very simply. Your cost will be for the actual display that measures as large as
          needed, usually about $20.. This option takes the least amount of time and can
          be done at any kinko or library with a computer center. Tools needed are a
          megapixel camera and minor photoshopping.

          Another option & the easiest is to just copy/xerox a map that you like in
          regular size, then print up as many copies as you need. You could insert the
          various embroidery styles from the appropriate locales. That way everyone in
          your embroidery club would have a copy to keep with them.

          Since you are doing a private, non-commercial project there should not be
          copyright concerns. If you are still concerned then do as I suggested earlier
          about removing extraneous text/graphics with photoshop. So long as there is at
          least a 15 percent change to a graphic, you are good to go. Even if someone
          drags you all the way to the courthouse, they will lose...dlb




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Inez Giles
          Thanks to you all for your helpful suggestions! I ll check them out today and I know I ll be in good shape! Thanks again - Inez From:
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks to you all for your helpful suggestions! I'll check them out
            today and I know I'll be in good shape! Thanks again - Inez



            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
            Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 8:07 AM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps





            I forgot. To work with vector graphics files, you can use free program
            called
            inkscape. http://www.inkscape.org/. <http://www.inkscape.org/> It's
            great!
            -- Lubos Brieda --

            Feast like at grandma's: www.slovakcooking.com
            Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

            ________________________________
            From: Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@... <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com> >
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Mon, February 7, 2011 8:03:48 AM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps

            Here is one for
            $10.
            http://www.canstockphoto.com/slovakia-map-black-and-white-mercator-425
            6546.html

            What you need is vector graphics, which can be resized to any size
            without
            losing resolution.
            -- Lubos Brieda --

            Feast like at grandma's: www.slovakcooking.com
            Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

            ________________________________
            From: Diana Boggs <smudsville@...
            <mailto:smudsville%40yahoo.com> >
            To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:slovak-world%40yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Mon, February 7, 2011 4:54:30 AM
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Maps

            The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either
            physically
            too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to
            clearly print.

            There are printable maps but they too are usually too small to be of
            benefit for

            a great display. I have tried to do something similar to your
            embroidery project

            with a mapped display of olde world/new world Greater Hungary. At that
            time, I
            didn't know about the camera trick for printing up large projects &
            got stuck
            paying for maps that I could not effectively use. With my 14 megapixel
            camera, I

            can produce a great photo as large as the side of a building. (LOL)

            This particular project or displays needs to have a larger (sized) map
            to work
            effectively as a display. You cannot make a photo or map larger to the
            size
            needed without pixiating the map out of focus & looking obtuse.
            Smaller, yes.
            Larger, never.

            Many Internet maps of a size that can be used for a display are
            individually
            copyrighted, unlike a copyrighted book that contains maps, where
            individuals may

            legally (fair use) use by quoting page, book and author so long as it
            is not a
            commercial project.

            There are several options for the embroidery crew. The option to take
            depends on

            that person's available time & toys...printer, scanner, camera and
            photoshop(including amateur photoshops). Many amateur photoshops that
            come with
            printer/scanner software can be effectively used. There are plenty of
            tutorials
            on youtube.

            I am listing options in "my" order of preference for the best
            resolution. For
            me, displays are all about presentation. But when all else fails
            guerilla/gorilla wrestle until you get what you want. Maps are a lot
            of fun to
            work with.

            1. Do it in photoshop where size of display is presized to desired
            size. However

            you still need a physically sized large map. If you cut out the guts
            of the map
            and then enlarge just the map outline and then clean up the outline,
            you can
            make a smaller map "work". This way your project should look the most
            professional, but will also take the most time. Tools needed are
            photoshop.
            2. Scan printed map at high dpi(300) so size is physically larger.
            However you
            are still limited to how big you can make a 300dpi scan and might not
            be able to

            get as big as you want. Some scanners refuse to scan maps at 300dpi.
            It is
            usually better to scan instead of photograph, but maps get hinky when
            scanned if

            you need a larger size than the scan provides. Tools needed are
            printer, scanner

            and photoshop. Results are professional looking. This method takes up
            more time
            than option 1.
            3. Photograph map in book or printed at high dpi. A 5 megapixel camera
            used with

            a tripod or something to steady camera will produce a photo
            approximately
            28inches on one side and 32 inches on the other side. If you focus in
            on the map

            so you don't have to crop then you have accomplished your goal for a
            large map
            very simply. Your cost will be for the actual display that measures as
            large as
            needed, usually about $20.. This option takes the least amount of time
            and can
            be done at any kinko or library with a computer center. Tools needed
            are a
            megapixel camera and minor photoshopping.

            Another option & the easiest is to just copy/xerox a map that you like
            in
            regular size, then print up as many copies as you need. You could
            insert the
            various embroidery styles from the appropriate locales. That way
            everyone in
            your embroidery club would have a copy to keep with them.

            Since you are doing a private, non-commercial project there should not
            be
            copyright concerns. If you are still concerned then do as I suggested
            earlier
            about removing extraneous text/graphics with photoshop. So long as
            there is at
            least a 15 percent change to a graphic, you are good to go. Even if
            someone
            drags you all the way to the courthouse, they will lose...dlb

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            _____

            No virus found in this message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 10.0.1204 / Virus Database: 1435/3426 - Release Date:
            02/06/11



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ron
            Depending upon a person s individual talents, equipment and interest in developing skills in this area, it may be easier for some to simply do a Google search
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Depending upon a person's individual talents, equipment and interest in developing skills in this area, it may be easier for some to simply do a Google search for "Slovakia map outline" if they don't have a high resolution camera. When you click on the "Images" option of Google search, you can choose the size of your images from the left hand column to seek the resolution you need for your project.

              Then again it is good to keep in mind the end resolution you need, and the precision or LACK of precision that will accomplish your task, so you avoid over-kill.

              Diane, thanks for the posting below, it is intersting to see what can be done on a serious level.

              Ron

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Diana Boggs <smudsville@...> wrote:
              >
              > The problem of uploading maps from the Internet is they are either physically too small and/or if physically large are too low of resolution to clearly print. There are printable maps but they too are usually too small to be of benefit for a great display. I have tried to do something similar to your embroidery project with a mapped display of olde world/new world Greater Hungary. At that time, I didn't know about the camera trick for printing up large projects & got stuck paying for maps that I could not effectively use. With my 14 megapixel camera, I can produce a great photo as large as the side of a building. (LOL)
              >
              > This particular project or displays needs to have a larger (sized) map to work effectively as a display. You cannot make a photo or map larger to the size needed without pixiating the map out of focus & looking obtuse. Smaller, yes. Larger, never.
              >
              > Many Internet maps of a size that can be used for a display are individually copyrighted, unlike a copyrighted book that contains maps, where individuals may legally (fair use) use by quoting page, book and author so long as it is not a commercial project.
              >
              > There are several options for the embroidery crew. The option to take depends on that person's available time & toys...printer, scanner, camera and photoshop(including amateur photoshops). Many amateur photoshops that come with printer/scanner software can be effectively used. There are plenty of tutorials on youtube.
              >
              > I am listing options in "my" order of preference for the best resolution. For me, displays are all about presentation. But when all else fails guerilla/gorilla wrestle until you get what you want. Maps are a lot of fun to work with.
              >
              > 1. Do it in photoshop where size of display is presized to desired size. However you still need a physically sized large map. If you cut out the guts of the map and then enlarge just the map outline and then clean up the outline, you can make a smaller map "work". This way your project should look the most professional, but will also take the most time. Tools needed are photoshop.
              > 2. Scan printed map at high dpi(300) so size is physically larger. However you are still limited to how big you can make a 300dpi scan and might not be able to get as big as you want. Some scanners refuse to scan maps at 300dpi. It is usually better to scan instead of photograph, but maps get hinky when scanned if you need a larger size than the scan provides. Tools needed are printer, scanner and photoshop. Results are professional looking. This method takes up more time than option 1.
              > 3. Photograph map in book or printed at high dpi. A 5 megapixel camera used with a tripod or something to steady camera will produce a photo approximately 28inches on one side and 32 inches on the other side. If you focus in on the map so you don't have to crop then you have accomplished your goal for a large map very simply. Your cost will be for the actual display that measures as large as needed, usually about $20.. This option takes the least amount of time and can be done at any kinko or library with a computer center. Tools needed are a megapixel camera and minor photoshopping.
              >
              > Another option & the easiest is to just copy/xerox a map that you like in regular size, then print up as many copies as you need. You could insert the various embroidery styles from the appropriate locales. That way everyone in your embroidery club would have a copy to keep with them.
              >  
              > Since you are doing a private, non-commercial project there should not be copyright concerns. If you are still concerned then do as I suggested earlier about removing extraneous text/graphics with photoshop. So long as there is at least a 15 percent change to a graphic, you are good to go. Even if someone drags you all the way to the courthouse, they will lose...dlb
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Nick Holcz
              ... regards Nick
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 7, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                >For your information.

                >Our local newspaper has an obituary for Josef Jurak born Stramberk
                >1924 died in Western Australia. They say he stole a German plane and
                >flew it to England and later joned a Czech squadron in the RAF.

                regards
                Nick
              • Paula
                Thanks for the info Nick that was my dad... Paula Jurak
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 9, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks for the info Nick that was my dad...

                  Paula Jurak

                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Nick Holcz wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > >For your information.
                  >
                  > >Our local newspaper has an obituary for Josef Jurak born Stramberk
                  > >1924 died in Western Australia. They say he stole a German plane and
                  > >flew it to England and later joned a Czech squadron in the RAF.
                  >
                  > regards
                  > Nick
                  >
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