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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!!

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  • LongJohn Wayne
    My relatives are like that today. Thanks for the reminder... and the lesson, Vilko. ... From: William C. Wormuth Subject: Re: [Slovak-World]
    Message 1 of 57 , Feb 2, 2011
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      My relatives are like that today.

      Thanks for the reminder... and the lesson, Vilko.

      --- On Wed, 2/2/11, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:

      From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!!
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 12:21 PM







       









      Barborka,



      You have found, that it is indeed, a small world.   Our people do appreciate visits from Americans, whether distant relatives of just visitors.  The doors open and the food and drinks never stop.

      When communists were in power, people were poor, meat was in short supply. people had to stand in line to purchase whatever was in the market.  when you reached the counter, you had to take the amount of whatever was available and often times was just fat. I remember seeing a line of 25 people waiting in line by a truck, to buy a small water mellon.

      You would never know this when visiting someone.  They would kill the last chicken to feed you.

      Also, you had to learn that you never admire plates or paintings or embroidery in the home or it would immediately be yours.



      Z Bohom,



      Vilo



      --- On Wed, 2/2/11, genmom4 <geismom@...> wrote:



      From: genmom4 <geismom@...>

      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!!

      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

      Date: Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 9:32 AM



       



      Kudos to you, Vilko, for your obvious love of your Slovak Roots.



      I am 7/8 Slovak and have done none of the compassionate works that you have mentioned here in this post. I am certain that those whom you have helped are very grateful.



      My husband and I did help out a cousin of mine when she came to the United States. She ended up marrying an American and lives in the US now.



      We managed to visit with her and her little girl while visiting Slovakia last spring. She was home for a visit at the same time that we were there. This was really kind of funny since it is the first time we have seen her since she married, she only lives about 8 hours from us, and we have to see her in Slovakia! But, when we visited, she mentioned to us how very grateful she was for what we did for her, and that she would never have been able to manage the first trip over if we had not been at the airport to pick her up and help her get settled into her summer job.



      So, you see, you never know how little things that you do may impact the life of someone.



      And, regarding my heritage, there was not one relative whom I met who did not welcome me with open arms and treat me as if I were a fellow Slovak. When it comes down to it, that's really what counts, isn't it?



      Have a great day.



      Barbara



      >



      > although only "1/2" Slovak, I was raised, culturally as a 100%.  I have been active in our culture all of my life.  I sponsored 6 of our people who left the communist country, sharing my home and pocketbook until they were settled.



      >



      > I began traveling to Slovakia in 1971, brought my mother there 4 times and brought relatives for visits 8 times.  I also accompanied 14 of my relatives for visiting "home".  My visit last year was my 28th. last visit



      >



      > After the fall of communists, I raised over $1200.  for renovating our Church In Kuty.  I love my people and boosted them financially, until communism was gone and they were able to subsist on their own.



      >



      > I participated in the annual Slovak cultural celebration until the closing of our church in 2009.  I bake Slovak pastry for our people in nursing homes and hospitals for each Easter and Christmas.



      >



      > Eight years ago, I had a Slovak family fro Skalica staying with me for 2 years, until their sons were given the USA citizenship allowed, because their father was naturalized.



      >



      > Seven years ago, I was asked by Joe Hornak to contact a Slovak young man in Albany, NY.  I did and he now lives with me.  He is an MD and works locally.  His family has been here for the past 2 years.



      >



      > I lend my services to help people with their genealogy and have been very successful in my research, a very time consuming process.



      >



      > I have been singing our folk songs since I can remember but now most of my singer friends are gone.



      >



      > That is enough data!  The reason for writing this is to finally ask AM  I  A SLOVAK ?



      >



      > Ja som pysny ze som Slovak!



      >



      > Nech Pan Boh daj Pozehnaj,



      >



      > Vilko



      >



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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • LongJohn Wayne
      Rick: Thank you for this post.  What a delight. Chuck ... From: Rick Sonzella Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!! To:
      Message 57 of 57 , Feb 3, 2011
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        Rick:

        Thank you for this post.  What a delight.

        Chuck

        --- On Wed, 2/2/11, Rick Sonzella <rson6542@...> wrote:

        From: Rick Sonzella <rson6542@...>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!!
        To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Wednesday, February 2, 2011, 4:44 PM







         









        I am sorry if I missed the gist of this post. But I wanted to interject.. I am not Slovak by birth or descent which makes me kinda sad.. In the trips (2) that I have done to SlovakiaPoprad in particular. I went to meet a friend whom I had been corresponding with for a year online. When I met her family (husband and rest of family) I had been greeted like I was a long lost relative. I was invited to the Grandfathers cottage house for a BBQ and again was treated like part of the family.. I was completely overwhelmed.



        My last day there on the first trip I was souvenir shopping to bring back gifts for my family, we went into a small souvenir shop and my friend explained to the shop keeper that I was from the US and what I was looking for. the shop keeper came out from behind the counter and helped me locate some bells for my mother. After i paid for them the shop keeper dropped into the bag several pictures, post cards, and calenders free of charge. My friend told me that she did that to try to get more Americans over for a visit.



        We had gone to their favorite pub in downtown Poprad (which I can not remember the name of) and my friend's husband told the owner of the pub that I was from America and we got most of our drinks for free that night. (needless to say I was lucky to be able to walk after that night. LOL more like staggered back to my hotel.) My friends made sure every night we went out or even during the day that I made it back to my hotel safe and without incident.



        I was so impressed with Slovakia and its people I am hoping that when I complete my school ( I went back to school for a new career after being unemployed for over a year) I will be able to find a job in or close to Slovakia so I can visit whenever I want to. 1 more year of school left and have all ready several job offers from international companies. So the prospects are good.



        Also Thank You to the owners of this group for allowing me to be a part of it.



        Rick Sonzella



        From: genmom4 <geismom@...>

        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

        Cc:

        Sent: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 9:32 AM

        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: We have a troll!!



        Kudos to you, Vilko, for your obvious love of your Slovak Roots.

        I am 7/8 Slovak and have done none of the compassionate works that you have mentioned here in this post. I am certain that those whom you have helped are very grateful.



        My husband and I did help out a cousin of mine when she came to the United States. She ended up marrying an American and lives in the US now.



        We managed to visit with her and her little girl while visiting Slovakia last spring. She was home for a visit at the same time that we were there. This was really kind of funny since it is the first time we have seen her since she married, she only lives about 8 hours from us, and we have to see her in Slovakia! But, when we visited, she mentioned to us how very grateful she was for what we did for her, and that she would never have been able to manage the first trip over if we had not been at the airport to pick her up and help her get settled into her summer job.



        So, you see, you never know how little things that you do may impact the life of someone.



        And, regarding my heritage, there was not one relative whom I met who did not welcome me with open arms and treat me as if I were a fellow Slovak. When it comes down to it, that's really what counts, isn't it?



        Have a great day.

        Barbara



        >

        > although only "1/2" Slovak, I was raised, culturally as a 100%. I have been active in our culture all of my life. I sponsored 6 of our people who left the communist country, sharing my home and pocketbook until they were settled.

        >

        > I began traveling to Slovakia in 1971, brought my mother there 4 times and brought relatives for visits 8 times. I also accompanied 14 of my relatives for visiting "home". My visit last year was my 28th. last visit

        >

        > After the fall of communists, I raised over $1200. for renovating our Church In Kuty. I love my people and boosted them financially, until communism was gone and they were able to subsist on their own.

        >

        > I participated in the annual Slovak cultural celebration until the closing of our church in 2009. I bake Slovak pastry for our people in nursing homes and hospitals for each Easter and Christmas.

        >

        > Eight years ago, I had a Slovak family fro Skalica staying with me for 2 years, until their sons were given the USA citizenship allowed, because their father was naturalized.

        >

        > Seven years ago, I was asked by Joe Hornak to contact a Slovak young man in Albany, NY. I did and he now lives with me. He is an MD and works locally. His family has been here for the past 2 years.

        >

        > I lend my services to help people with their genealogy and have been very successful in my research, a very time consuming process.

        >

        > I have been singing our folk songs since I can remember but now most of my singer friends are gone.

        >

        > That is enough data! The reason for writing this is to finally ask AM I A SLOVAK ?

        >

        > Ja som pysny ze som Slovak!

        >

        > Nech Pan Boh daj Pozehnaj,

        >

        > Vilko

        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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