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Folk trade--23

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  • Fedor, Helen
    Prague represented the largest market for embroideries, and was the destination for up to 30 traders. They also sold house-to-house in other Czech towns, such
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 21, 2011
      Prague represented the largest market for embroideries, and was the destination for up to 30 traders. They also sold house-to-house in other Czech towns, such as Plzen~, Ostrava, and Brno, where more wealthy families lived, and where there were offices. Traders always wore their folk costume, which for foreign consumers came to be a sign or symbol of embroidery sales. This job had a strong influence on the social situation of embroiderers (traders and their families) [sic] as well as on the general economy. Its influence was also reflected in the use of urban elements in households [any guesses as to what these elements might be?], in the use of more luxurious textiles for clothing, and in the urbanization of the architecture [I don't have a clue about this last one].(24)

      The population abroad also came into contact with traders in woolen cloth for mill bags. These traders came from the Myjava area, located on the Slovak-Moravian border. The cloth was sold at annual fairs and distributed by post, but most of it was sold house-to-house, by regions. Before 1918, linen [woolen-cloth?] weavers used to visit Austria, countries of the former Yugoslavia, Italy, Galicia, the entire Kingdom of Hungary, and Bohemia.(25)


      H
      All opinions my own


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