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Re: Slovak equivalent of Vincentia

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  • allanstevo
    Julie, January 21 is the name-day for people named ´Vincent´ in Slovakia. While the name Vincentia is not a common name, I would consider it a Slovak name
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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      Julie,
      January 21 is the name-day for people named ´Vincent´ in Slovakia. While the name Vincentia is not a common name, I would consider it a Slovak name because its male equivalent appears on the Slovak calendar.

      Allan
      www.52inSk.com

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
      > recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
      > equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
      >
      > D'akujem,
      >
      > Julie Michutka
      > jmm@...
      >
    • Julie Michutka
      Hmm, excellent point, Allan. So, no likely spelling change. That would answer my question then, thank you! Julie jmm@pathbridge.net
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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        Hmm, excellent point, Allan. So, no likely spelling change. That
        would answer my question then, thank you!

        Julie
        jmm@...


        On Dec 6, 2010, at 11:38 AM, allanstevo wrote:

        > Julie,
        > January 21 is the name-day for people named ´Vincent´ in Slovakia.
        > While the name Vincentia is not a common name, I would consider it a
        > Slovak name because its male equivalent appears on the Slovak
        > calendar.
        >
        > Allan
        > www.52inSk.com
        >
        > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
        >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
        >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
        >>
        >> D'akujem,
        >>
        >> Julie Michutka
        >> jmm@...
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • William C. Wormuth
        Ulis~a, Je to tak! http://www.sk-spell.sk.cx/slovniky/index.php/list/21/3,V.xhtml ________________________________ From: Julie Michutka
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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          Ulis~a,

          Je to tak! http://www.sk-spell.sk.cx/slovniky/index.php/list/21/3,V.xhtml





          ________________________________
          From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, December 5, 2010 7:40:22 PM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak equivalent of Vincentia


          I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
          recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
          equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....

          D'akujem,

          Julie Michutka
          jmm@...






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • CurtB
          Julie, You ve made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is just a female
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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            Julie,
            You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is just a female equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are interesting names because their origin is late Christian Latin era, and not Greek as most Christian names. THe name is not found in Classical Latin. Its origins are obscure but is assumed it comes from the verb to conquer. The name Vincentia spread into Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish but not into French. It got borrowed and used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
            In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and female names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent Vincentia.The reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech, Slovak, Hungarian or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's name. The name day is traditionally assigned because of the celebration of a saint's feast day. These days have changed over the years because of many revisions of church calendars. There was no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have been a few recent canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman Martyrology.

            But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out of their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.

            Curt B.



            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
            > recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
            > equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
            >
            > D'akujem,
            >
            > Julie Michutka
            > jmm@...
            >
          • Julie Michutka
            Awesome, thanks! So that final -t on Vincent gets changed for the feminine form. What a great resource! Julie
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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              Awesome, thanks! So that final -t on Vincent gets changed for the
              feminine form. What a great resource!

              Julie

              On Dec 6, 2010, at 2:16 PM, William C. Wormuth wrote:

              > Ulis~a,
              >
              > Je to tak! http://www.sk-spell.sk.cx/slovniky/index.php/list/21/3,V.xhtml
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
              >
              > I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
              > recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
              > equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
              >
              > D'akujem,
              >
              > Julie Michutka
              > jmm@...
            • Julie Michutka
              Hi Curt, Interesting point about Greek vs Latin names; I ll have to think on that one. Vincent is just straight from the Latin imperfective active participle,
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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                Hi Curt,

                Interesting point about Greek vs Latin names; I'll have to think on
                that one. Vincent is just straight from the Latin imperfective active
                participle, "conquering."

                I'd wonder if this were an illegitimate birth, b/c those kids
                sometimes get the odd names (altho' what's odd in one village isn't
                necessarily odd in another), but this girl and her twin Agnes were the
                last in a large family. Vincentia (now Vincencia!) died young, so I
                have her name documented twice.

                I don't know what to make of her family using an unusual name; or, her
                godparents choosing it.... I wonder sometimes how strictly that custom
                was followed, that the godparents named the child. And there are
                times when I'm reading through the parish registers when I could swear
                that the priest is choosing the names for a stretch of time.

                Thanks to all who helped!

                Julie Michutka
                jmm@...

                On Dec 6, 2010, at 3:58 PM, CurtB wrote:

                > Julie,
                > You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent
                > because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is
                > just a female equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are
                > interesting names because their origin is late Christian Latin era,
                > and not Greek as most Christian names. THe name is not found in
                > Classical Latin. Its origins are obscure but is assumed it comes
                > from the verb to conquer. The name Vincentia spread into Italian,
                > Portuguese, and Spanish but not into French. It got borrowed and
                > used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
                > In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and
                > female names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent
                > Vincentia.The reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech,
                > Slovak, Hungarian or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's
                > name. The name day is traditionally assigned because of the
                > celebration of a saint's feast day. These days have changed over
                > the years because of many revisions of church calendars. There was
                > no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have been a few recent
                > canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman Martyrology.
                >
                > But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out
                > of their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.
                >
                > Curt B.
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                >>
                >> D'akujem,
                >>
                >> Julie Michutka
                >> jmm@...
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Lubos Brieda
                Julie, how about Vincentka Van Gogova? ... -- Lubos Brieda -- Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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                  Julie, how about Vincentka Van Gogova?
                  :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrQYcXsvtck
                  -- Lubos Brieda --
                  Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

                  Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com




                  ________________________________
                  From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Mon, December 6, 2010 8:51:32 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak equivalent of Vincentia

                  Hi Curt,

                  Interesting point about Greek vs Latin names; I'll have to think on
                  that one. Vincent is just straight from the Latin imperfective active
                  participle, "conquering."

                  I'd wonder if this were an illegitimate birth, b/c those kids
                  sometimes get the odd names (altho' what's odd in one village isn't
                  necessarily odd in another), but this girl and her twin Agnes were the
                  last in a large family. Vincentia (now Vincencia!) died young, so I
                  have her name documented twice.

                  I don't know what to make of her family using an unusual name; or, her
                  godparents choosing it.... I wonder sometimes how strictly that custom
                  was followed, that the godparents named the child. And there are
                  times when I'm reading through the parish registers when I could swear
                  that the priest is choosing the names for a stretch of time.

                  Thanks to all who helped!

                  Julie Michutka
                  jmm@...

                  On Dec 6, 2010, at 3:58 PM, CurtB wrote:

                  > Julie,
                  > You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent
                  > because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is
                  > just a female equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are
                  > interesting names because their origin is late Christian Latin era,
                  > and not Greek as most Christian names. THe name is not found in
                  > Classical Latin. Its origins are obscure but is assumed it comes
                  > from the verb to conquer. The name Vincentia spread into Italian,
                  > Portuguese, and Spanish but not into French. It got borrowed and
                  > used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
                  > In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and
                  > female names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent
                  > Vincentia.The reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech,
                  > Slovak, Hungarian or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's
                  > name. The name day is traditionally assigned because of the
                  > celebration of a saint's feast day. These days have changed over
                  > the years because of many revisions of church calendars. There was
                  > no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have been a few recent
                  > canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman Martyrology.
                  >
                  > But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out
                  > of their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.
                  >
                  > Curt B.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                  >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                  >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                  >>
                  >> D'akujem,
                  >>
                  >> Julie Michutka
                  >> jmm@...
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Lubos Brieda
                  Oh, and by the way, check this out: http://meetupblog.meetup.com/ For those of you who don t know MeetUp, it s an online place where people can organize groups
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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                    Oh, and by the way, check this out: http://meetupblog.meetup.com/

                    For those of you who don't know MeetUp, it's an online place where people can
                    organize groups based on some common interest. There are groups for hiking,
                    dancing, mushroom picking, you name it. I am active here in the D.C. area with
                    the Slovak meetup group. We work closely with SASW (the group Helen is in), and
                    get together to go to the movies, happy hours, festivals, etc...
                    -- Lubos Brieda --
                    Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

                    Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com




                    ________________________________
                    From: Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...>
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Mon, December 6, 2010 9:18:00 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak equivalent of Vincentia

                    Julie, how about Vincentka Van Gogova?
                    :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrQYcXsvtck
                    -- Lubos Brieda --
                    Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

                    Hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com




                    ________________________________
                    From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Mon, December 6, 2010 8:51:32 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak equivalent of Vincentia

                    Hi Curt,

                    Interesting point about Greek vs Latin names; I'll have to think on
                    that one. Vincent is just straight from the Latin imperfective active
                    participle, "conquering."

                    I'd wonder if this were an illegitimate birth, b/c those kids
                    sometimes get the odd names (altho' what's odd in one village isn't
                    necessarily odd in another), but this girl and her twin Agnes were the
                    last in a large family. Vincentia (now Vincencia!) died young, so I
                    have her name documented twice.

                    I don't know what to make of her family using an unusual name; or, her
                    godparents choosing it.... I wonder sometimes how strictly that custom
                    was followed, that the godparents named the child. And there are
                    times when I'm reading through the parish registers when I could swear
                    that the priest is choosing the names for a stretch of time.

                    Thanks to all who helped!

                    Julie Michutka
                    jmm@...

                    On Dec 6, 2010, at 3:58 PM, CurtB wrote:

                    > Julie,
                    > You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent
                    > because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is
                    > just a female equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are
                    > interesting names because their origin is late Christian Latin era,
                    > and not Greek as most Christian names. THe name is not found in
                    > Classical Latin. Its origins are obscure but is assumed it comes
                    > from the verb to conquer. The name Vincentia spread into Italian,
                    > Portuguese, and Spanish but not into French. It got borrowed and
                    > used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
                    > In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and
                    > female names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent
                    > Vincentia.The reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech,
                    > Slovak, Hungarian or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's
                    > name. The name day is traditionally assigned because of the
                    > celebration of a saint's feast day. These days have changed over
                    > the years because of many revisions of church calendars. There was
                    > no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have been a few recent
                    > canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman Martyrology.
                    >
                    > But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out
                    > of their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.
                    >
                    > Curt B.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                    >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                    >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                    >>
                    >> D'akujem,
                    >>
                    >> Julie Michutka
                    >> jmm@...
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • CurtB
                    Julie, The Greek/Latin stuff is not so important. I was just pointing out that early Christianity was Greek speaking and not Latin speaking. So for the first
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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                      Julie,
                      The Greek/Latin stuff is not so important. I was just pointing out that early Christianity was Greek speaking and not Latin speaking. So for the first 300 years the Christians have Greek names and the early saints are Greek named. The New Testament was written originally in Greek and Christianity spread throughout the empire among Greek speakers. Latin doesn't get used much until the 4th century. That is when St. Vincentius appears in Spain, martyred under Diocletian, and the name Vincentius spread quickly in every European martyrology, or saint list. I think St. Augustine picked the 21 Jan date for the liturgical celebration.

                      CB
                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Curt,
                      >
                      > Interesting point about Greek vs Latin names; I'll have to think on
                      > that one. Vincent is just straight from the Latin imperfective active
                      > participle, "conquering."
                      >
                      > I'd wonder if this were an illegitimate birth, b/c those kids
                      > sometimes get the odd names (altho' what's odd in one village isn't
                      > necessarily odd in another), but this girl and her twin Agnes were the
                      > last in a large family. Vincentia (now Vincencia!) died young, so I
                      > have her name documented twice.
                      >
                      > I don't know what to make of her family using an unusual name; or, her
                      > godparents choosing it.... I wonder sometimes how strictly that custom
                      > was followed, that the godparents named the child. And there are
                      > times when I'm reading through the parish registers when I could swear
                      > that the priest is choosing the names for a stretch of time.
                      >
                      > Thanks to all who helped!
                      >
                      > Julie Michutka
                      > jmm@...
                      >
                      > On Dec 6, 2010, at 3:58 PM, CurtB wrote:
                      >
                      > > Julie,
                      > > You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent
                      > > because it is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is
                      > > just a female equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are
                      > > interesting names because their origin is late Christian Latin era,
                      > > and not Greek as most Christian names. THe name is not found in
                      > > Classical Latin. Its origins are obscure but is assumed it comes
                      > > from the verb to conquer. The name Vincentia spread into Italian,
                      > > Portuguese, and Spanish but not into French. It got borrowed and
                      > > used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
                      > > In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and
                      > > female names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent
                      > > Vincentia.The reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech,
                      > > Slovak, Hungarian or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's
                      > > name. The name day is traditionally assigned because of the
                      > > celebration of a saint's feast day. These days have changed over
                      > > the years because of many revisions of church calendars. There was
                      > > no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have been a few recent
                      > > canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman Martyrology.
                      > >
                      > > But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out
                      > > of their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.
                      > >
                      > > Curt B.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@> wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                      > >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                      > >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                      > >>
                      > >> D'akujem,
                      > >>
                      > >> Julie Michutka
                      > >> jmm@
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ------------------------------------
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Edward T. Surkosky
                      I imagine Vincentia would be a feminine form of Vincent. St. Vincent de Paul founded an order of nuns that are commonly called the Vincentian Sisters. If there
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 6, 2010
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                        I imagine Vincentia would be a feminine form of Vincent. St. Vincent de Paul
                        founded an order of nuns that are commonly called the Vincentian Sisters. If
                        there were no St. Vincentia then they would celebrate St. Vincent as their
                        patron.

                        Ed Surkosky

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "CurtB" <curt67boc@...>
                        To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 3:58 PM
                        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak equivalent of Vincentia


                        > Julie,
                        > You've made an interesting find. There is no modern equivalent because it
                        > is so rare. The name itself is interesting because it is just a female
                        > equivalent of Vincentius. Vincentia/Vicentius are interesting names
                        > because their origin is late Christian Latin era, and not Greek as most
                        > Christian names. THe name is not found in Classical Latin. Its origins
                        > are obscure but is assumed it comes from the verb to conquer. The name
                        > Vincentia spread into Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish but not into
                        > French. It got borrowed and used a bit in Bavaria, but even rare there.
                        > In name calendars one finds separate name days for both male and female
                        > names like Miloslav and Miloslava, but not for Vincent Vincentia.The
                        > reason it is not found in the name calendars of Czech, Slovak, Hungarian
                        > or Polish, is simply because it is NOT a saint's name. The name day is
                        > traditionally assigned because of the celebration of a saint's feast day.
                        > These days have changed over the years because of many revisions of church
                        > calendars. There was no saint Vincentia, thus no name day. There have
                        > been a few recent canonizations, so Vincentia now does appear in the Roman
                        > Martyrology.
                        >
                        > But to use the name in the time you found it means someone went out of
                        > their way to use an unusual name, and not that of a saint.
                        >
                        > Curt B.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                        >> recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                        >> equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                        >>
                        >> D'akujem,
                        >>
                        >> Julie Michutka
                        >> jmm@...
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • George Sirko
                        Julie, Thanks. My misunderstanding. Happy Holidays to Everyone. George ... From: Julie Michutka Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 7, 2010
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                          Julie,
                          Thanks. My misunderstanding. Happy Holidays to Everyone.
                          George

                          --- On Mon, 12/6/10, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:


                          From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak equivalent of Vincentia
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Monday, December 6, 2010, 5:06 AM


                           



                          Thanks George; an interesting site. But I'm not looking for the
                          meaning of Vincentia; I need to know if it has a different form in
                          modern Slovak. For example, Victoria (English/Latin) vs Viktoria
                          (Slovak).

                          Julie

                          On Dec 6, 2010, at 12:13 AM, George Sirko wrote:

                          > I found this . Maybe it will help.
                          > George
                          >
                          >
                          > http://babynamesworld.parentsconnect.com/meaning_of_Vincentia.html
                          >
                          > --- On Sun, 12/5/10, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > I'm having trouble with one name: 1860 Slovak baptismal record,
                          > recorded in Latin, girl's name Vincentia; what's the modern Slovak
                          > equivalent? I'm not finding it on my name list....
                          >








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