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Folk trade--4

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  • Fedor, Helen
    C~aplovic~ also mentions wheelwrights, hoop makers (hoops for barrels), sieve makers, trough makers and coopers, makers of weaving reeds (tools to push down
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 3, 2010
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      C~aplovic~ also mentions wheelwrights, hoop makers (hoops for barrels), sieve makers, trough makers and coopers, makers of weaving reeds (tools to push down the thread securely into place as it is woven < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed_(weaving) >),(2) and makers of shingles (for roofs).

      He also mentions a whole range of wooden products, which were important articles of trade: carts, hoops, sieves, troughs, wooden mortars, wine pipes < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butt_(unit) >, various kinds of cooper's goods, and also wooden vessels, plates, cups, spoons, spindles, wine barrels, coffins, and shingles. Among the traders he noted were also axle-grease men, lime burners, traders of products made from sheep's milk, and tinkers.(3) Pavol Dobs~insky' completed this list by mentioning picture-makers and stationers (sellers of writing paper), basket makers, brush makers, and traders in scythes.(4)

      Itinerant trading was a significant agent in the movement of the population regionally, locally, and internationally. In central Europe, foreign itinerant traders worked alongside native ones. In some areas, there was a tradition of long and regular personal contact between traders and the local population. Relations between different groups [which groups? the locals and the various traders?] were not only based on economics, but also cut across a variety of cultural and social lines. The fact that itinerant traders were one of the important means of mutual understanding between the residents of different countries. In those countries they came to be a part of the rhythm of village life, and part of the economic and social/cultural life of the local community.

      *********************

      Different topic. In Slovak, an elf is a <s~kriatok>. What would you call a female elf (or are Slovak elves sexless)? On a related topic, when I looked up the word in a dictionary, I saw that a "typo" is a <tlac~iarensky' s~kriatok> [a printer's elf].

      H
      All opinions and misinterpretations my own


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