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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: languages, was: Geo-miscrafs

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  • William C. Wormuth
    I am a Roman Catholic and have limited knowledge concerning the Byzantine Church.  I do know that my the referenced church was Greek Catholic and because the
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 18, 2010
      I am a Roman Catholic and have limited knowledge concerning the Byzantine Church. 

      I do know that my the referenced church was Greek Catholic and because the language used in the mass was "old Slav", (as I believe), was as written by St. John Chrysostom. Cyrillic is the written form of the mass for the Slavs.  Therefore, the writing on the stones, reflect the belief of the people and have nothing to do with nationality. 
      I believe that the mass is the same in all  Byzantine Uniate as well as the Orthodox Churches.

      It would be interesting to all if someone here were to supply factual info on the history of slovak and Rusin Byzantines and the Rusin, "Russian" Orthodox, whose adherent were Greek Orthodox Uniate believers.

      Z Bohom,

      Vilo

      --- On Wed, 11/17/10, LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> wrote:

      From: LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: languages, was: Geo-miscrafs
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 9:53 PM







       









      Were not the Byzantine churches nationalistic in nature?  Would they not have been Slovak  Orthodox?



      --- On Wed, 11/17/10, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:



      From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>

      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: languages, was: Geo-miscrafs

      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

      Date: Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 8:32 PM



       



      Curt,



      I do realize what you are saying andbut was not clear in my message.  These people are Slovaks but because of their Greek Catholic religion, wrote in Cyrilic



      z Bohom,



      Vilo



      --- On Tue, 11/16/10, CurtB <curt67boc@...> wrote:



      From: CurtB <curt67boc@...>



      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: languages, was: Geo-miscrafs



      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com



      Date: Tuesday, November 16, 2010, 7:46 PM



       



      Vilo,



      Cyrillic is just the alphabet, not a language. What language these people spoke is another question. Some spoke an Eastern Slovak dialect, some spoke what some call Rusyn, and others further east spoke Ukrainian. From just an inscription or even a short text one frequently can't tell. There are great arguments about this among partisans and scholars. I don't get involved in those discussions. I am just confronted with written monuments, documents, and texts and deal with each one separately.



      Curt B.



      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> wrote:



      >



      > My first exposure to Cyrill in Slovakia was in the Greek Catholic cemetery in Huta, near Bardejov.  Most of the writing on the stones was in Cyrilic, (not "Ukrainian")



      >



      > Vilo



      >



      > --- On Tue, 11/16/10, Fedor, Helen <hfed@...> wrote:



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      > From: Fedor, Helen <hfed@...>



      > Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] languages, was: Geo-miscrafs



      > To: "'Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com'" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>



      > Date: Tuesday, November 16, 2010, 9:13 AM



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      > Let me add 'Ukrainian' to your list. Imagine my surprise when the church records for my dad's village (SSE of Kos~ice) suddenly appeared in Ukrainian for a few years, then reverted back to Hungarian. It couldn't hurt to learn the Cyrillic alphabet (even though the different languages using it use slightly different versions of it (more, or fewer, characters))...for just in case.



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      > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Julie Michutka



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      > Sent: Monday, November 15, 2010 11:20 PM



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      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com



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      > Subject: [Slovak-World] languages, was: Geo-miscrafs



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      > Martin (and anyone else who is knowledgeable), if I can ever scrape up



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      > the money to get back to Slovakia and get to some archives to start



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      > digging into sources of local history, verrry roughly how much of what



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      > might be available will be in Hungarian? I'm assuming that I would



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      > run into Latin, Slovak, German, and Hungarian. I realize I'm asking a



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      > nearly impossible-to-accurately-answer question, but still I wonder....



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      > Julie Michutka



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      > jmm@...<mailto:jmm%40pathbridge.net>



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      > On Nov 15, 2010, at 9:43 PM, votrubam wrote:



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      > >> During which time frame? Was there no time frame when



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      > >> Hungarian was taught during the Austo-Hungarian reign?



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      > > The strongest pressure to impose Hungarian ethnicity and language on



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      > > the non-ethnic-Hungarian subjects of the Kingdom of Hungary, who



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      > > were in the majority when all were added up, started in the 1870s.



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      > > Helen's question was about the language taught in Silesia to those



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      > > who left the Kingdom to attend high schools there. Hungarian was



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      > > not taught anywhere in the Habsburg monarchy (i.e., the Austrian



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      > > Empire, renamed and hyphenated A-H in 1867) outside of the Kingdom,



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      > > which was only one of the about three dozen of the Habsburgs'



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      > > provinces.



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      > > Martin



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